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evil smoked knucklebones!

technodoll
June 28th, 2006, 05:58 PM
i feel bad for the dogs when it rains because they don't get alot of fun outside playtimes, so on Monday I bought them each a huge smoked knucklebone... figured they would enjoy chewing on those and it would keep them busy... even through the plastic they were incredibly greasy, and smelled a bit "chemical".

my boy left his on the floor after 2 minutes, and never touched it again. my girl enjoyed hers for a while and then i took it away. my iron-stomached girl then had diarrhea Tuesday morning, which we attributed to the weekend of lake swimming, etc, figured she must have eaten some dead bird or something... she ate a big breakfast and last night her poop was perfect. she had a normal dinner and then chewed on the knuckebone again before bed. no poop at the dog park this morning (which isn't unusual) but then my dog sitter calls and says she had diarrhea in her crate, and while we were talking she pooped on his floor :eek: My poor little girl, who has a stomach of steel and is never sick... the ONLY thing different in her diet was the stinky knuclebone :mad: my boy is the one with the sensitive tummy and he is fine, and they both ate the same thing for dinner last night, but he didn't touch the bone. hah.

needless to say, i am returning them to the petstore for my money back!

Prin
June 28th, 2006, 07:43 PM
Didn't you search here for smoked bones before you tried them?! I don't know any dog that can handle them. Boo and Jemma got the super pukes after them.:yuck:

technodoll
June 28th, 2006, 07:47 PM
no, i didn't.... it was a spur-of-the-moment purchase, i was buying them one of those devil-balls and the bones were there, i was tired after a long day's work and plodding home in the sticky rain and not thinking straight, LOL! i'll do a search on them now, you've piqued my curiosity :D

Skryker
June 28th, 2006, 09:12 PM
Ugh! My guys had similiar problems with the smoked bones. I thought I was doing a good thing. Nope. Bronny threw up and they both had diarrhea. Now they get heavy marrow filled soup bones that I find frozen at the grocery store. They love them and no one gets sick. (But I still worry about their teeth. And I take them away if the dogs start to get chips off of the bone.)

technodoll
June 28th, 2006, 09:40 PM
well now i'm alot wiser... never again! :yuck:

Prin
June 28th, 2006, 10:37 PM
lol now that you're addicted to pets.ca, you should know that before you try anything new, you have to search or ask first. :D ;)

mafiaprincess
June 28th, 2006, 11:15 PM
I've never had a smoked bone problem. But I haven't bought one in a while. I discovered the joy of fresh marrow bones from the butcher this week though.

greaterdane
June 29th, 2006, 12:01 AM
I've never had a smoked bone problem. But I haven't bought one in a while. I discovered the joy of fresh marrow bones from the butcher this week though.


I got 3 packs of fresh marrow bones last week. They were a huge hit and super cheap. I'm going back for more tomorrow.

jessi76
June 29th, 2006, 08:50 AM
Tucker can't handle the smoked ones either...he gets the super-pukes too. I made the mistake once... never again!

doggy lover
June 29th, 2006, 09:50 AM
I give Tucker the fresh raw ones too and never had a problem. My last dog got the runs from either of them, sensitive tummy always.

technodoll
June 29th, 2006, 10:13 AM
i can't give my boy any "wreck" bones (aka big, raw weight-bearing bones), his teeth chip way too easily and his gums get lacerated. he will eat a couple raw meaty bones per week though (chicken, turkey, pork, all soft edibles bones smothered in meat) so that takes care of some scrubbing. i've started to brush his teeth now, making it a bedtime routine... he definitely has sucky teeth genetics! :D
my girl is on a raw diet (prey model) so she's good with her pearly whites :thumbs up

Dog Dancer
June 29th, 2006, 12:07 PM
So what bones are good for our big dogs? I bought raw buffalo knuckle bones for Halo (lab X) and Shadow (Akita X). Needless to say they both loved them, but Halo just smashes them to bits chewing them up. When I picked up her poop one night it was full of sharp splinters :eek: I immediately threw the bones out and still have one in the freezer that I won't give them now. Apparently her chew-ability is good! They both eat Go Natural dog kibble - not a raw diet so I'm always curious about what bones would be okay for them. They love them but Halo is the bone destroyer!

technodoll
June 29th, 2006, 12:47 PM
i wish i knew :o some dogs just power through anything... my friend's pitbull is mister destructo, he's been stealing forks and spoons lately and bending them into exotic pretzels (i've seen his artwork!) and yet his teeth are intact... :eek:
some dogs do well chewing on big raw bones (femur or knuckle), some break their teeth on them and others break the bones and eat the splinters. if anyone has a solution for recreational chewing i'd love to hear about it, LOL!

littlesister
June 30th, 2006, 11:26 AM
Ok
I've been giving mine raw, frozen beef marrow bones, the soup kind. She gets a little runnier crap than normal, but it does miracles for the teeth, and is hours of enjoyment.
Now I've heard of giving raw chicken bones, etc, but I am afraid of things getting stuck.
With the beef shank (I think) bones, she rarely manages to break them and just gets a good teeth cleaning.
What are opinions out there about other bones like chicken as mentionned? Can't they cause choking, internal injuries, etc?

technodoll
June 30th, 2006, 11:58 AM
What are opinions out there about other bones like chicken as mentionned? Can't they cause choking, internal injuries, etc?


well sure, anything is possible. so is choking on toys, sticks, socks, kibble, tennis balls and the ensuing obstructions. vets have had to remove the most incredible things stuck in a dog's intestines :eek: i figure if 99% of the world's carnivores are eating raw meat and bones with no problems and no human intervention, my dogs can too :D

littlesister
June 30th, 2006, 12:06 PM
However,
The wild dogs would probably rarely live out their full life spans, as I would hope my dogs do. I also hope to avoid any 4-figure veterinary bills.
I guess I'm lucky so far, my dogs haven't swallowed any non-edibles to my knowledge! I don't tend to give them sharp pointy toys either though.

technodoll
June 30th, 2006, 03:13 PM
The wild dogs would probably rarely live out their full life spans, as I would hope my dogs do.

i guess you would know those facts better than i do... are you actively involved in the study and analysis of the earth's wildelife? :rolleyes: how about you read this for a little information: http://rawfed.com/myths/wolflongevity.html i don't care to convince you of anything, you asked a question and i replied.. your choice to like the answer or not! in the meantime, i & hundreds of thousands of other dog owners will continue to feed raw chicken (including the bones) to our dogs well into their ripe old, healthy age. :pawprint:

Prin
June 30th, 2006, 08:10 PM
Technodoll, how about a link about wolf longevity from a site that isn't pushing raw?;)

littlesister
June 30th, 2006, 08:59 PM
Original Question:

What are opinions out there about other bones like chicken as mentionned? Can't they cause choking, internal injuries, etc?

Unecessarily Snarky part of Answer:

well sure, anything is possible. so is choking on toys, sticks, socks, kibble, tennis balls and the ensuing obstructions. vets have had to remove the most incredible things stuck in a dog's intestines

Another Snarky comment:

i guess you would know those facts better than i do... are you actively involved in the study and analysis of the earth's wildelife?

Snarky answer:

Probably at least as involved in it as you are, perhaps even more.

Prin
June 30th, 2006, 09:56 PM
Cooked bones can splinter and get lodged very easily in the throat or GI tract and should be avoided. Raw bones can still be choked on, break teeth, break off into big chunks that block the GI tract somewhere requiring an operation, but it doesn't happen as often as it does with rawhides or other bones (so they say).:)

technodoll
June 30th, 2006, 10:26 PM
Unecessarily Snarky part of Answer:

well sure, anything is possible. so is choking on toys, sticks, socks, kibble, tennis balls and the ensuing obstructions. vets have had to remove the most incredible things stuck in a dog's intestines


i'm sorry you interpreted that as "snarky". perhaps if other people say it, like VETS, you'll then get it? sigh... some people... why do they bother posting a question if they don't want any answers? or are you just on PMS! :confused:

http://www.petprotect.co.uk/ThingsDogsHaveEaten.shtml

is that list long enough for you, or do you want more?:cool:

Cooked bones can splinter and get lodged very easily in the throat or GI tract and should be avoided. Raw bones can still be choked on, break teeth, break off into big chunks that block the GI tract somewhere requiring an operation, but it doesn't happen as often as it does with rawhides or other bones (so they say).

prin, i TOTALLY agree!! that is why i don't feed those big raw bones to my dogs. they only get the small, soft, easily digestible ones... like chicken bones! LOL

technodoll
June 30th, 2006, 11:08 PM
Technodoll, how about a link about wolf longevity from a site that isn't pushing raw

your wish is my command ;)

Timber wolf: http://www.colszoo.org/animalareas/namerica/anpg/wolf.html

Longevity: In the wild, a wolf may survive eight or nine years. Wolves die from injuries sustained during hunting. They also can suffer from arthritis, cataracts, malnutrition, cancer, and other diseases. Traps, poisonings, and shootings contribute to many wolf deaths despite legal protection of the animals. Deaths of captive wolves may be due to poor facilities, faulty capture systems, harassment, and illnesses.

grey wolf: http://www.canids.org/SPPACCTS/greywolf.htm#Diet

Reproduction: Time of mating: January-April. Gestation: 6 1 63 days. Litter size: 1-1 1, mean 6. Duration of lactation: 8-10 weeks. Age at sexual maturity: 22-46 months (Mech, pers. comm.), occasionally 10 months. Longevity: up to 13 years in the wild (Mech 1988), 16 years in captivity

...i could spend hours digging up more but anyone can google... the page here http://rawfed.com/myths/wolflongevity.html just resumed everything so well, shouldn't matter which website hosts the information, as long as the facts are correct. :pawprint:

erykah1310
June 30th, 2006, 11:32 PM
Sorry , back on the bone topic there, ummm? Anyone have any "horror" stories about moose, caribou, deer and beef bones?? thats what my dogs chew on. We have a freezer FULL of them. Every once and a while we pull a few out and toss them to the dogs. No problems yet, but I have always wondered if freezing them did anything to the bones ( besides freezing them lol)

Tigger
July 1st, 2006, 08:20 AM
Please keep discussions civilized. Bickering back and forth will only lead to individuals discrediting information simply for tone and attitude of posters. Remember that you catch more flies with honey. Thank you.

technodoll
July 1st, 2006, 08:58 AM
Freezing bones does not alter their chemistry (like cooking or smoking does), the only thing is does is halt bacteria growth during the freeze period. :thumbs up

erykah1310
July 3rd, 2006, 02:19 PM
Great, i was wondering about that for a while , thanks techno!