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Prong Collars - thoughts?

malph
June 6th, 2006, 12:13 PM
hey guys, what are your thoughts on this collar. its for our JRT who is 1 yr 6 months. we have been advised to use it to stop pulling, and most other bad behaviours. any success stories or words of caution before we decide to use this?

http://www.petsmart.com/media/ps/images/products/detail/large/June05/lrg_50718_482f5.jpg

LavenderRott
June 6th, 2006, 12:27 PM
IF your dog has had some formal training and IF you have someone show you the proper way that it should be worn - then it can be a wonderful TOOL to help you train your dog not to pull.

I, personally, would use one before I put a choke collar on a dog.

jessi76
June 6th, 2006, 12:30 PM
if you do a search for prong collars, you'll get many threads with many different opinions on them. alot of yay's and nay's on the matter.

I have never used one, as I'm quite fond of the head harnesses to help stop the pulling.

who advised you to use one? a trainer? have you been SHOWN how to use this tool properly?

jesse's mommy
June 6th, 2006, 12:39 PM
We've had to switch Jesse to a prong collar since we've moved here. Where I lived before she was wonderful with the harness, but here there are just too many smells (and lizards) that she is interested in and pulls like crazy. It was a difficult decision because I know she isn't that bad with me on the harness, but is horrible with the man. I however was sure to consult a professional on the proper use and also was sure to put it on my arm to make sure it would not cause damage. I would never use a choke collar. The man wanted that and I refused so we came to a compromise on the prong. I'm not crazy about it, but she is learning and I hope to have her off of it within the next few months. It's definitely good for a training tool to dogs that pull, but it's not something I'm planning on using forever. I'd like to eventually get her back to the harness.

Prin
June 6th, 2006, 01:23 PM
I would not use a prong on a Jack Russell. Their skin is not as thick as some of the larger breeds, IMO. I'd try something more humane, like the Newtrix halti: http://newtrix.ca/docs/ourproducts.php It works really well.

erykah1310
June 6th, 2006, 01:29 PM
Ditto Prin, I myself either wouldnt use a prong on a small breed. Perhaps an untrained Rottweiler or St.Bernard, there are situations where TOOLS like this could come in handy (USING PROPERLY) I would opt for the gentle leader. They work great. Most importantly, while you are using which ever TOOL you decide to use, make sure that you are also training the dog to walk nicer. I am against when people permanently use training tools to walk their dogs.
Altough I understand that Jacks are ENERGETIC and will need lots of training!

malph
June 6th, 2006, 01:45 PM
thanks for the quick responses everyone. it should be noted that we will be using this to correct a number of other bad habits he has picked up....he is very possesssive over high value treats and certain toys..

we are working with a certified trainer (1 on 1) that is teaching us proper technique.

this is the first we have heard about concern over breaking skin...we do notice that his neck is already red from the bungy collar we currently use (from pulling so much)

mafiaprincess
June 6th, 2006, 04:41 PM
I used to use a prong on my cocker spaniel. We tried 3 or so harnesses and a head collar and failed with them. Worked well as a training tool, but they aren't meant as the final solution. I've weaned mine onto a flat collar.
But have started using it for rollerblading. But I don't want to have to use it forever there either.

LavenderRott
June 6th, 2006, 05:38 PM
Prong collars come in several sizes and if one is really worried about breaking skin - you can get little rubber things to cover the tips.

Having put a prong collar on my arm (and having done the same with a regular choker) I can tell you that the prong is much more humane then the choker. I am not a fan of the over the nose types of "collars". My mom uses one on her greyhound and while it does keep her from pulling while walking, after two years the dog still spends a considerable amount of time trying to paw it off of her nose.

technodoll
June 6th, 2006, 10:33 PM
Here is a great site that shows how to correctly fit, position & use a prong collar, no matter the breed: http://www.leerburg.com/fit-prong.htm

since following this advice, walking the dogs is a whole new pleasant experience for everyone! :thumbs up

Inverness
June 7th, 2006, 12:00 AM
Prong collars can be used without actually tieing the leash to them, but rather clipping it to a second collar. It has the same effect of getting the dog's attention, without causing any damage to the skin since there is no pressure on the pins.

kaytris
June 7th, 2006, 08:59 AM
thanks for the quick responses everyone. it should be noted that we will be using this to correct a number of other bad habits he has picked up....he is very possesssive over high value treats and certain toys..

we are working with a certified trainer (1 on 1) that is teaching us proper technique.

this is the first we have heard about concern over breaking skin...we do notice that his neck is already red from the bungy collar we currently use (from pulling so much)


Although physical correction will surpress his growling reaction as he 'resource guards', and you may never ever have any further problems, you are taking a risk, and its a fairly big one.

Take away the warning, and the dog will still want to guard, but knows it will be punished for growling - so it may take the next step, which will be a bite. Wouldn't it be better to teach him that he doesn't have to resource guard?

There's a wonderful book "Mine" by Jean Donaldson. She is the training director at the SF SPCA, and the protocols she outlines in the book are the ones she used with her resource guarding chow - who was ready to bite over possessions at 8 weeks. The chow is now several years old and pretty much bomb proof - she can't even get a reaction out of her for demonstration purposes anymore.

Beau'sMom
June 7th, 2006, 09:39 AM
We are using the prong collar on our dog. He is 63 lbs and a HoundX so he loves to chase scents. Using this collar enables my 80lb son to walk him with confidence that he has control. We haven't had the need though to use it for anything but his walks. :fingerscr

tenderfoot
June 7th, 2006, 04:00 PM
Good advice - kaytris!

Better to teach a proper response to life than to control with a potentially harmful device.

I won't get into the whole 'to prong or not to prong' debate, but you need to think deeply about the reasons for his bad behavior and consider a good training program to learn how to influence his behavior - just as a good parent would teach their errant child.

mafiaprincess
June 7th, 2006, 08:16 PM
I went to go rollerblading with Cider today. Found out she knows the difference between a connected prong collar and not. She wore both, leash to the flat collar, and to walk to the car she was a monster. Switched when I got my blades on, and she knew in a second that it was connected instead.

Sounded like a neat idea, she's just too smart. But I dislike the thought of havign to use a training tool for the life of a dog, and really hope to be able to phase out needing a prong for any occassion in a few months, I hope.