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Temple Grandin's Animals in Translation - genetics and behaviour

kaytris
May 2nd, 2006, 09:39 AM
Anyone read it? I'm having trouble with alot of the discussion about slaughterhouses, but there are some very interesting passages.

One chapter, she states that there may be a link between a labrador's propensity for mouthiness and its tendency to over eat. When we breed for mouthing behaviour (ie willingness to retrieve), the instinct to eat increases - and vice versa. (she also says Holstein cows, which have been bred to eat and eat and gain weight, are mouthier than other cows, and enjoy licking and gumming people and other animals. )

It's a very good read, IMO

erykah1310
May 2nd, 2006, 01:01 PM
(she also says Holstein cows, which have been bred to eat and eat and gain weight, are mouthier than other cows, and enjoy licking and gumming people and other animals. )

I dont know about this, my boyfriends parents have Highland Cattle and they are OBSESSIVLY mouthy!!! Always trying to lick you and chew on your clothing. All 13 of them are the same!!! I d say they mouth as much or even more than a Holstein ( freinds cows) ITs kinda hard to say if there is a link!

badger
May 2nd, 2006, 01:45 PM
I admire this woman so much. She has autism, and has come up with strategies and inventions to keep herself healthy and moving forward (including, I once read, a 'hugging machine': autistic people are sometimes phobic about human-to-human contact, but we all need a hug occasionally). Her connection with cattle, in particular, is amazing. She wrote an important study on slaughter-houses in the States, which led to a number of improvements in the care of live animals (which, of course, leads to better meat, but never mind), such as curved ramps into the slaughterhouse so they can't see what's coming. I know, it seems academic, given their fate, but she really feels for them. As far as I know, however, she has not taken that next step and become a veggie. Never mind.

Prin
May 3rd, 2006, 12:33 PM
(she also says Holstein cows, which have been bred to eat and eat and gain weight, are mouthier than other cows, and enjoy licking and gumming people and other animals. )I don't know about that either- aren't holsteins more for dairy? What would be the point of fattening up a dairy cow?


I haven't read the book though.