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What could possibly be the reason behind docking???

erykah1310
April 24th, 2006, 10:02 PM
Im just wondering exactly why people dock certain dogs tails? Honestly I feel that this is just a cruel as declawing a cat or cropping ears. I have read on one of the threads about a boxers tail being like a broom stick ( or something along those lines) So really why is it that we continue to mutalate puppies with docking?? And what were the valid reasons for doing it at all in the first place?? This just doesnt make any sence..
Are any of you as opposed to this as I am? Its never really mentioned on this site.

technodoll
April 24th, 2006, 10:17 PM
historically, in working & hunting dogs it did serve a purpose (harder for another animal or human to latch on during a fight) but the vast majority of today's dogs are done purely for a cosmetic reason... breed standards adopted a long time ago and never changed. i think if done when puppies are only a day or two old, with anaesthesia, it's OK. a long-tailed doberman or rottie or boxer, for example, is just not the same IMO... looks less "pure". but perhaps that will change, with time - not 20 years ago almost all boxers and great danes had their ears cropped but today, most are left natural. same for dobermans... however in the show world, it's still very difficult for a natural-eared dog to win against cropped dogs. and all docked breeds are still docked. different standards in europe though.

erykah1310
April 24th, 2006, 10:27 PM
Good for Europe!!!
but perhaps that will change, with time - not 20 years ago almost all boxers and great danes had their ears cropped but today, most are left natural.
Im hoping in time that will change, Everyone has their own opinion of course, but IMO after having a Rottie with a tail, I wouldnt want it any other way. I guess it just grew on me! lol
I do agree that it looks good (maybe just cause we havent seen many "natural" dogs in a while), but frankly alot of people think breast implants and needless plastic surgery looks good too:yuck: at least it was the humans choice though!

phoenix
April 24th, 2006, 11:27 PM
Neither of my dogs have tails. We're not sure what happened to Sam's... at 5 1/2 weeks he didn't have one and that's all we know. His nub has a little bend at the end of it, so maybe he broke it. Maia was docked as a young'un... she has a fairly ugly scar from it... I think it was probably done with an elastic unfortunately, poor babe.

But, neither of them miss their tails (from what I can see)... and it's kind of nice not to have them sweeping things off of the table. I'm not sure why I don't have an issue with docking, maybe because it's done so young. I do know some dogs break their tails, and maybe why it is done for some short haired long thin tailed dogs... I don't really know. I like how it looks on boxers and rottis though... cute little nubbies. If my dogs had tails, I certainly wouldn't dock them now.

BUT, I am so against cropping. I guess that is slightly hypocritical. But, cropping is done when they are older, it is painful, and takes a lot of aftercare. And, I don't like the look either.

Joey.E.CockersMommy
April 24th, 2006, 11:42 PM
Joeys tail is docked but he was done soon after birth - I believe most cockers are docked and few are not. I wouldn't specifically want his tail to be docked - if he came the other way that would be fine to.

isabelleo
April 25th, 2006, 12:00 AM
I don't see the difference between declawing cats and docking dogs' tails. It serves even less purpose because it's purely for esthetic reasons. Dogs' tails come like that naturally because it helps them balance their body, and if tails were a hindrance rather than an aid they wouldn't have evolved with them. It's amputation and it's inhumane and I strongly disagree with it, even though it is "breed standard".

mafiaprincess
April 25th, 2006, 12:52 AM
Yes, but removing a tail is done super young.. and people declaw cats at any age. And I've seen few lasting complications from docking, versus cats that can barely walk from declawing.
It is simply breed standard, but I'm quite happy to have a cocker with no tail. I agree it's not the same to have a dobe with a tail too. But I wouldn't deny a rescue a home because of it, or love a dog any less.

mummummum
April 25th, 2006, 02:26 AM
Forgive my bluntness but, to cut pieces off of an animal so that it meets someone's artificial standard of an aesthetically pleasing "specimen of the breed" seems barbaric to me.

And I really don't understand the "well, it's done when they're so young" argument - puppies are fully able to experience pain. Recent studies on pain and human infants show that infants may experience pain MORE acutely than do older children and adults - who's to say puppies aren't the same. And for all we know maybe they do miss their tails and ears, maybe they even feel the equivalent of phantom limb pain.

I wouldn't consider docking my dawgs any more than I would consider binding my own feet. It's an interesting topic though because it brings to the surface the whole notion of animals as possessions, as entertainment, as commodities who are permitted to exist at and for our pleasure.

lpn169
April 25th, 2006, 02:52 AM
Arent male humans more often than not circumcised? The ones who are against docking newborn puppies tails, I am just curious if the have a male child and if they circumcised him.

Prin
April 25th, 2006, 06:02 AM
lol who knows where this conversation will go. If I had a boy, I'd leave him "be", but if I had a dog with a tail normally docked, I probably would do it.

Do you know how many dishes this tail has broken? It doesn't matter too much because it's padded on his end, but if it wasn't and he was constantly injuring himself, I would want to prevent that.

I mean look at it. It's like an otter bit him in the a** and didn't let go.
(this is the best pic I have of it- not great, sorry).

BMDLuver
April 25th, 2006, 06:45 AM
From what I've seen, anesthesia is not used on pups of that age to dock tails. It is recommended to be done from 3 days old or less as the feeling is minimal apparently. Yet I heard a litter of little schnauzer pups getting their tails done and it sounded far from painless.

Probably why I didn't have the heart to dock a litter of newborn Rottie pups tails and the rescue eventually taking them also agreed to leave them natural.

As for circumcision, that's a whole other ball of wax and has religious connections that would be better off left alone.

joeysmama
April 25th, 2006, 07:00 AM
I'll weigh in on cicumcision rather than docking. I had considered not having my boy circumcised and considered the pros and cons for a long time. My father had not been, due to the standards in his European family. My husband hadn't either since the hospital didn't bother circumcising very premature infants. My brothers had been as that was standard procedure where and when they were born.

So I wasn't sure, but ended up having him circumcised because I had read that it made it easier for a young boy to maintain cleanliness and slightly reduced the risk of penile cancer.

When it's done for religious reasons it's performed as a ceremony on the eighth day as commanded by God in the Bible. Interestingly, it's on the eighth day of life that our immune systems and clotting factors will be at their peak.

Anyway--that's my slight hi-jack, little trivia contribution, for the day.

As for docking, none of my children were born with tails so I didn't have to make that decision. ;) I can understand it though if a dog is born with a tail that is likely to get broken. Otherwise I don't know if I'd feel right having it done.

gomez
April 25th, 2006, 07:19 AM
On some working dogs, the tail can become not only a serious hindrance to the job at hand, but can also become dangerous if it gets caught on brambles or down a rat hole...

I'm sure you would rather see a dog's tail docked than a dog caught on a bramble, alone, unable to move, he would die... or a rat chomping off a large piece of an undocked tail...

And yes, wether you all like it or not, there is a large number of working dogs in the world...

Rottielover
April 25th, 2006, 08:29 AM
a very contreversial subject for rottie owners.....I personally love the look of a tailed rott, and my next one most likely will have a tail. But to stand a chance in the CKC shows the tails are docked. Even though you can now show with a tail, judges prefer docked. Seiger shows actually have many tailed dogs in the ring, it is great to see. Europe has made it illeagal to dock...Way to go europe. Harleys breeder has been docking tails for 10 years with a vet right beside her. She does it at 2 days old.
This will always be a sore spot to many. I am just glad that my vet clinic no longer crops or docks.

LM1313
April 25th, 2006, 10:17 AM
I think it's cruel, cutting off a body part for no reason. No one would trim a baby's ears, even if the kid had the biggest, most sticking-out ears in the world. One of the reasons I sometimes hear is that hunting dog's tails (like cocker spaniels) will get "caught on things." BS! Wolves go hunting--their tails don't get caught. Labs go through the same underbrush when they're out bird hunting--miraculously their tails don't get caught either!

A dog's tail helps it communicate and balance. When Ebony's arthritis started getting bad, she would use her tail (which was massive and hung all the way down to her back ankles) to help keep her upright and moving, either pumping it in one direction or swinging it in another . . . She would have lost her mobility years earlier without her tail. Well worth a few Christmas ornaments being smashed.

Edit: Prin, Ebony's tail was very much like Boo's! Only a bit thicker and a tad longer, LOL! If she got really excited and you were behind her, you'd get quite a wallop with it! WHAM WHAM WHAM! When she was in her prime she'd race around the yard like a blur and her tail would be doing this sort of cartwheeling spin when she turned a corner, to keep her on her feet. It was worth it just for that! :D

~LM~

technodoll
April 25th, 2006, 10:25 AM
interesting article... from http://www.cdb.org/case4dock.htm

Why Are Dog's Tails Docked?
1. To avoid tail damage
A number of working gundog breeds have to hunt game through heavy vegetation and thick brambles, where their fast tail action can easily lead to torn and bleeding tails which are painful and extremely difficult to treat. Docking the end of the tail eliminates the risk of injury.

Working terriers are docked for the same reason. In addition, terriers which are bred to hunt below ground for purposes such as fox control, have their tails docked to a length which is more practical when working in a confined space.

Other non-working breeds which have an enthusiastic tail action, are also liable to damage their tails, even in the home.

Since docking was banned in Sweden in 1989, there has been a massive increase in tail injuries amongst previously docked breeds. Within the 50 undocked Pointer litters registered in that year with the Swedish Kennel Club, 38% of dogs suffered tail injury before they were 18 months old and in 1991, the number of individuals with tail injures had increased to 51% of the group.

2. For reasons of hygiene
Long haired, thick coated breeds like the Yorkshire Terrier and Old English Sheepdog are docked to avoid the hair around the base of the tail becoming fouled by faeces. Even with constant grooming and washing, such fouling is unpleasant. If allowed to get out of hand, it can lead to severe problems of hygiene, or even flystrike and subsequent infestation by maggots.

Hygiene problems can be greatly reduced or eliminated altogether by docking.

3. To maintain breed standards
Breeds which have been docked over many generations have been selected for specific qualities of build and conformation, but not for tail length, shape or carriage.

If left undocked, it is unlikely that the best dogs would carry good tails. In seeking to maintain the quality of the breeds, breeders would therefore be left with a diminished number of suitable sires and dams. The genetic pool would be reduced, greatly increasing the risk of hereditary diseases taking hold. Some breeds could even disappear for ever.


hmmm sounds like weak arguments to me, but what do i know... i had two show dobies before, docked & cropped, dewclaws removed and totally LOVED it... hate whipping tails smashing into me and knocking stuff off the tables... my friend's pitbull lashes me on and behind the knees with his hard tail and it really HURTS. my two akitas, thankfully, are completely natural and come with perfect tails... curled up on their backs... i prefer dogs left as nature intended but do like the look & practicality of docked tails and also cropped ears (for dogs like dobies, cane corsos, argentine dogos....). a totally personal preference that i will not debate :)

other articles of interest, pro-docking:

http://www.trader.co.nz/vizsla/docking/

http://www.global.net.au/~aegis/taildocking.htm

... for every article written FOR docking, there is another one written AGAINST. makes for an interesting day of reading!

phoenix
April 25th, 2006, 10:30 AM
An interesting read on the matter.
http://www.cdb.org/swedishdamage.htm

This has boxers (and if you look in the index, other dogs) that have sustained tail damage in the UK.

I'm not sure about this topic yet. The thin, unprotected tail does seem to lend itself to injury.

Lucky Rescue
April 25th, 2006, 12:23 PM
If any dogs should suffer tail injuries, it's pit bulls. My dog's tail is forever whipping and smashing into things (Including my shins, nose etc :( ), yet pit bulls are not docked, but are often cropped. The reason given for cutting off their ears to avoid injury in the pit is just ridiculous, since they regularly get horrid injuries during fights, like broken legs, jaws, flanks torn open, testicles ripped off. Do you really dogfighters care if their dog's ears are hurt?:rolleyes: They are cropped to make them appear more intimidating only.

I'm sure you would rather see a dog's tail docked than a dog caught on a bramble, alone, unable to move, he would die... or a rat chomping off a large piece of an undocked tail...

A dog lying there dying from having the tail caught in a bramble is pretty unimaginable...and I would rather have a rat chomp my dog's tail than the vulnerable area under and around it where serious and permanent damage could be done.

Bassets and spaniels are hunting dogs too, and I would think those huge, dangling and curly (in the case of spaniels) ears would be much more easily injured - or caught in brambles - than the tail of a working Rottie would.

What about setters and their long, feathered tails? Won't they get caught too? Why aren't they docked? And bloodhounds, tracking through heavy bush, with tails AND pendulous ears!

Cropping and docking is done for fashion and nothing more. But having said all that, I really do love the look of a beautifully cropped and docked Doberman. To me that is an awesome sight. Would I crop a Dobie puppy of my own? Probably not, but I would take one already done.

technodoll
April 25th, 2006, 12:41 PM
quote from: http://www.trader.co.nz/vizsla/docking/

hmmm intersting therories put forth here...

Myth 8: Other hunting dogs don't have their tails docked
The practice of docking some hunting dog's tails was done for practical reasons, if there is no practical reason, why dock at all?
There are so many different types of dogs and so many different types of tails; tail carriages (high, low, over the back, under the belly etc); tail actions; tale lengths; tail coverings (course hair, long hair etc) ; tail thicknesses etc. Even amongst seemingly similar gundogs there are a vast array of tails.

Consider that there are also a vast array of hunting types that gundogs are bred to be used for. Examples are lowland duck hunting (rivers and marshes), upland game hunting (pheasant and quail) , brush hunting, flushing, deep bush stalking, birds, rabbits, deer etc. All sorts of different tpes of game in all sorts of different types of terrain.

A breed of gundog bred for lowland duck retrieving would be unlikely to suffer tail damage swimming out to retrieve shot birds when compared to a gundog bred for charging through thick scrub sniffing a hot trail. The Vizsla is bred as a versatile hunting dog with abilities of hunting, tracking, pointing and retrieving through all terrain bred to go through, rather than around.

Similarly, a tail that is covered in course or long hair (eg. the Irish Setter), or one fully protected in a layer of fat and muscle (eg. the Labrador Retriever), is less likely to sustain damage when compared to a tail that has no protection.

The English Pointer is often mentioned as similar to dogs like the GSP, Vizsla and Weimaraner, yet it does not have a docked tail. What people fail to take into account is that, unlike these versatiles (bred to hunt, point and retrieve feather & fur game on land and water, and often working in dense scrub and bush) the English Pointer was originally bred to simply POINT birds and the English used other specialist dogs to flush, retrieve and track. English Pointers are more commonly used for versatile work nowadays and it is not unusual to hear an owner bemoan the lack of docking due to tail injury their dogs are receiving.

The Vizsla's tail is very thick and powerful at the base giving tremendous strength to the tail action that increases dramatically in forcefulness when on a hot trail. The end of the tail filters off to thin with no muscle or fat, only thin hair.

Without any protection at all, the tip (under very little control as there is no muscle at the tip), will shatter when connected with an object much like the tip of a fly rod connecting with a tree when given a flick.

LM1313
April 25th, 2006, 12:48 PM
2. For reasons of hygiene
Long haired, thick coated breeds like the Yorkshire Terrier and Old English Sheepdog are docked to avoid the hair around the base of the tail becoming fouled by faeces. Even with constant grooming and washing, such fouling is unpleasant. If allowed to get out of hand, it can lead to severe problems of hygiene, or even flystrike and subsequent infestation by maggots.

Uh oh, my parents have a long-haired cat with an undocked tail. I'd better call them right away to get that rectified!

Last time I checked, feces do not come out of the TAIL of a dog, but out of an area often refered to as the BUTT. Unless your dog has a severe case of the runs or sits in its own feces, I can't imagine why anything other than the base of the tail would have gunk on it . . . and the base of the tail is there no matter what, even with docking, so . . . yeah, I crumple that argument up and throw it in the wastebasket.

~LM~

Lucky Rescue
April 25th, 2006, 01:35 PM
2. For reasons of hygiene
Long haired, thick coated breeds like the Yorkshire Terrier and Old English Sheepdog are docked to avoid the hair around the base of the tail becoming fouled by faeces.

That's rather amusing.

"Long haired, thick coated breeds"...like Chows, Collies, Shelties, Samoyeds, Lhasa Apsos, Poms....? I guess someone forgot to dock Lassie's tail.:p

Clipping the hair would be much more effective than cutting the tail off.

mafiaprincess
April 25th, 2006, 03:38 PM
My neighbour's collie constantly has crustie poop stuck to her bum, her tail, etc. I cut the hair around her tail last week to try to help her cleanliness.. Cider is docked being a cocker.. but her tail still sits down over her anus.. So if poop was an issue.. being docked wouldn't really help.

Luvmypit
April 25th, 2006, 04:03 PM
I can attest to the pit bulls tail. Its truly deadly. I always wondered if he has any tail injuries. He slams that tail into the wall and anything hard and never seemed to have a problem.


I think this is a touchy issue for some but at the same time I do not think there is any valid reason to get a dog docked or cropped. Its all cosmetic. Would I do it? No But I also think its up to individual dog owners. I do have more of a problem with cropping as I feel sorry for the dogs after they have, having to get redressed and tended to. The pain and healing. I have heard docking is less painless if hardly painful at all. But I personally would not do it. But really for me its personal preference.

phoenix
April 25th, 2006, 04:43 PM
Thanks for all the interesting info everyone. Technodoll- yes, I agree with what is written there; dogs like viszlas and boxers and dobes that have powerful muscles and no protection (fat, feathers) on their tails are more prone to injury. I don't think (at least originally) that it is pure cosmetics.

I was reading up on this and one site said that for breed standard, the dogs haven't been judged on tail carriage, length, shape, whatever... so it adds a completely new element to the judging. This then impacts bloodlines and gene pools... an interesting thought as well for the show set.

Anyway, I also wanted to add, Lucky: Feathers on a tail/legs/etc like a spaniel are to draw water away from the skin. Water collects in droplets and is directed to the ground. I learned this from having horses- if you cut their feathers/fetlocks too short, they can end up with foot rot on their heels. That's why spaniels and setters have been bred to have them.

I'm still on the fence.

erykah1310
April 25th, 2006, 04:52 PM
Im really liking the spirit of this debate!
However i stand firm on not docking ( heard the screams from the vets office once and it haunts me still)
On some working dogs, the tail can become not only a serious hindrance to the job at hand, but can also become dangerous if it gets caught on brambles or down a rat hole...

I believe this could happen to all working dogs, (I love it when a dog that was bread for a purpose is used for it, but thats a whole new thread) On the other hand, when dogs are "working" dogs, the owners keep a close eye on them ( most do) alot of training and work goes into having an excellent work companion, I would definately look for Meiko if he didnt return after herding the cows ( neighbours) I wouldnt call it a nite if the neighbour didnt return with him. And as far as his "job" around here he is just working in the yard. Also ( Meik the multi job dog) when retrieving ducks and geese during hunting season is supervised FULLY. He has a tail and is yet to be injured. ( also with long hair he does not have any "poop" hanging, we GROOM him!!)
I strongly believe that " IF THEY WERE BORN WITH A TAIL, ITS THERE FOR A REASON"
But thats my opinion!

Lucky Rescue
April 25th, 2006, 05:41 PM
Lucky: Feathers on a tail/legs/etc like a spaniel are to draw water away from the skin. Water collects in droplets and is directed to the ground. I learned this from having horses- if you cut their feathers/fetlocks too short, they can end up with foot rot on their heels. That's why spaniels and setters have been bred to have them.

Yes, perhaps, but the argument for docking tails is that the dog will get snagged in heavy brush or brambles and lie there and die(??) or that it is unhygenic. The long feathering on setters and spaniels is very prone to matting and tangling (I once had an English setter for a period of time) so I would say their tails would be caught in brambles more than the tails of short haired breeds who are docked.

And it seems that long, furry tails are only unhygenic on certain breeds, like English Sheepdogs, but perfectly hygenic on other breeds. I"m not saying no one should dock dogs, but people should be honest and say they just like the look, as these arguements make no sense at all.

Prin
April 25th, 2006, 05:51 PM
I think it's cruel, cutting off a body part for no reason. No one would trim a baby's ears, even if the kid had the biggest, most sticking-out ears in the world. I find it funny when human ears come into the conversation... I had my ears pinned at 8 years old and it was a pain I'll never forget. They took a piece out the size of a man's thumb on each ear. I'd do it again though. My ears were flappy and my hair was thin... Do the math.:D I hear much better behind me now, too...

Honestly, I think none of the old reasons for docking hold up anymore. A lot of the traditional beliefs of dog care and stuff don't even consider the dog's point of view. It was always what was best for the human and for productivity from the dog.:rolleyes:

If I had a dog with a whip for a tail, I'd probably dock it. But chances are, I'll never get a puppy that young (or even be involved with a puppy that young), so it won't be up to me anyway.

jesse's mommy
April 25th, 2006, 06:02 PM
My sisters dog is a Rott/GSD mix with an undocked tail. Sweetest dog in the world, loves people and loves to wag her tail. Unfortunately she has the Rott tail and has actually bruised and welted my leg on many occassions -- not little bruises or welts mind you, big whiplike bruises and welts. Not to mention the fact that my sister can't keep things on her living room table with the fear that things will go flying. Now that I've experienced this, I have to say I would probably dock a tail like that in the future -- provided the dog is young and won't be scarred from it. If the dog was older, then I would just move the stuff within reach and wear padding on my legs like the little girl in the Charmin commercials ice skating and padding her bum to protect her. :D

rainbow
April 25th, 2006, 06:27 PM
Labs have tails like that too. They're always wagging and knocking things over.:D But I would never ever consider docking one.:eek:

Prin
April 25th, 2006, 06:31 PM
Yeah, that's like Boo- they knock stuff over, but they don't hurt like a pitty or dane tail hurts. For pitties and danes, it's instant bruising for both the whipper and the whippee...

Joey.E.CockersMommy
April 25th, 2006, 09:27 PM
IPN169=Arent male humans more often than not circumcised? The ones who are against docking newborn puppies tails, I am just curious if the have a male child and if they circumcised him.

I think its fifty fifty now - its not covered in BC under medical - I have two boys and opted not to I dont believe its necessary.

speaking of that sort of you can get implants for male doggies if you know what I mean - I would never do that - but apparently you can I think they are called neuticals.

erykah1310
April 25th, 2006, 09:45 PM
:confused: Neuticles??? Why would you do that?:confused:
I bet there is a hefty price attached to that??

phoenix
April 25th, 2006, 09:50 PM
lab tails are nothing like the whip tails. lab tails are fat and cushiony (although I agree they knock lots over with them!) My little boxer's tail has no protection at all. I'm not surprised the tailed boxers bleed so much at the tip. And those poor crooked tail guys!
If some of these whippy breeds are breaking their tails and having amputation at older ages, I think that's a good argument for preventative docking.

BTW, I am enjoying the spirit of this too. Lots of respect for other points of view and opinions. :highfive:

Prin
April 25th, 2006, 10:37 PM
:confused: Neuticles??? Why would you do that?:confused:
I bet there is a hefty price attached to that??
So that your dog might lose his sperm, but not his manhood.;) They're silicone implants and the inventor won a type of nobel prize for them...:rolleyes:

Oh, I watched a documentary a long time ago about circumcision and if I had a boy, I wouldn't do it. All you have to do about the hygiene difference is pull the hood back so to speak... The risk is minimal for cancer (I think 1/10000 men or something). And I've heard that uncircumcised mannies are happier. ;)

meb999
April 26th, 2006, 11:15 AM
Oh, I watched a documentary a long time ago about circumcision and if I had a boy, I wouldn't do it. All you have to do about the hygiene difference is pull the hood back so to speak... The risk is minimal for cancer (I think 1/10000 men or something). And I've heard that uncircumcised mannies are happier. ;)

Same here, my dad said after researching the pros and cons of circumcision in med school, he'd NEVER have his son circumcised. There are other ways of 'keeping clean' like...you...washing!! I wouldn't get my son circumcised...but that's just me.

Now about docking. I don't know if I'd ever get a puppy docked, although, I'd probably never get a puppy...so that sorta resolves my issue. There was an un-docked rottie/boxer at the dog park and the owner said his tail was always bleeding from slamming into things.
I'm just sad that Buster had a botched docking. The vet said it was probably done too late, and probably just snapped off by hand. People often notice his scared tail, poor little huney.

OntarioGreys
April 26th, 2006, 11:55 AM
Greyhounds have very much the whiplike tail and they do damage it easily


Sunny when I got him the end of the tail was split by end the day he was flying around the yard with his tail whipping in circle and he lost the first bandage hair and all and the end revealed it was infected the the tissue was dying
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y53/mleg2001/fd58a1a9.jpg

He was put on antibiotics with a surgery scheduled to amputate back to health tissue as the vet wanted to save as much length as possible, and that was where the nightmare began, because he would spin his tail so hard it was difficult to keep a bandage on, so during the amp surgery the vet decided to use a syringe over the end to protect the stitched end, and sewed it on to try keeping from being whipped off, well the next day swatted his tail against the wall, and the syringe cracked as as I checked it out it filling with blood, so I tale part of the day off work to get him to the vet to have it checked out, the stitches are now split open and he needs to be sedated again to resew up, and a new syringe tube stitched on, by the next day running outside there goes syringe bandages soaring like a bird , so I bandage it out as best I can and call the vet, because he flung it off so easy the vet decides not to put another on and risk doing move skin damage, I go thru a few weeks of trying on my own, by this time I have wall and ceiling washing down to a fine art, every time he resplits it, it looks like the site of a murder scene, the vet finally decides to take him for a week to see if he will have better success, within a couple days his office was getting sprayed with blood.
Now we are back to my turn again, and I take a week off work so I can make it a full time effort , Sunnys stitches are gone and the skin is too damaged to resew up and has pulled away from the tip, if we can;t get it to heal he will have to be re-amputated cutting it back to a stub to reduce the chance of tearing the stitches and bumping it
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y53/mleg2001/fd58a54a.jpg

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y53/mleg2001/tail.jpg

Now the attempt is to get the tissue to granulate as quickly as possible so the end doesn't start dying again, so the vet arms me with a special spray to help it granulate and a bottle of clotting agent to apply each time it start bleeding, Throught out my off I have padded all my wall corners, all furniture is moved against walls, I keep him on leash outside, hang on his tail when he is passing thru hallways and I don't leave the house without him, because his worse excitement is when I return home. By the end of the week to flesh has granulated. He is still banging it sometimes and started the bleeding but it is nowhere as bad as it was.


I adopted him January 4th it was Easter weekend that we finally had the last bleeding incident which was very minor but by then enough hair has grown over the tail to help cushion and protect it, if you part the hairs on the end of his tail you still see the end of last tail sticking out

So almost 4 months to get one split end to heal, it was a wonder I even had paint left on the walls after washing 3 or more times a day for almost 3 months I can see all to well why many hunting breeds have their tails docked, if I have to ever repeat another docking due to injury the tail will get cut short, well maybe :p depending which dog it is

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y53/mleg2001/fa9dda7f.jpg

meb999
April 26th, 2006, 05:30 PM
awwww, poor Sunny :(



He was put on antibiotics with a surgery scheduled to amputate back to health tissue as the vet wanted to save as much length as possible,

My family's Collie, George (R.I.P.), hit his tail on the wall so hard once he snapped the end of it. It was horrible. They amputated a piece of it, but it kept getting infected, and the skin would die off and expose the bone...it was a horrible ordeal. George had to have 3 different amputations...what a nightmare!

Prin
April 26th, 2006, 11:46 PM
Poor Sunny. :( In the pic the tail looks so raw. Poor doggy.