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it's vaccination time....

meb999
April 21st, 2006, 04:37 PM
ok, so I'm reading up on vaccines -- and some think that not only are they not necessary, but can be detrimental to your pet's health.
There's a debate on whether the annual booster's for parvo and distemper are necessary.
Here's my understanding of a vaccine : they inject you with a diluted disease to help you make antibodies for it. right? :o If humans don't need anual boosters for all the vaccines we got as kids, why do dogs? Are there vaccines I should tell my vet NOT to give. Are there some that HAVE to be given?
I'm going to the vets on monday to give Buster his annual inoculations...
Does everyone here get the whole vaccination package? I'm getting a little confused...:confused: :confused: This is almost as complicated as Bankrupcy law!!

meb999
April 21st, 2006, 04:41 PM
some fun reading...hope this doesn't get you as confused as it got me :D

http://www.portovilladogs.com/vaccines.cfm

http://www.prevention.com/article/0,5778,s1-6-81-118-3844-1,00.html

http://www.vetinfo.com/dogvacc.html#Yearly%20vaccination%20rethinking

http://www.mercola.com/2003/apr/2/dog_vaccines.htm

http://www.canismajor.com/dog/vaccine.html#Work

ok...I'll stop now....

wdawson
April 21st, 2006, 06:42 PM
i'm in the same situation at the end of may.......i've heard rabies should not be given annually......yet i need proof of vac for the tags..i can get away this year ......i'm confused also

Luba
April 21st, 2006, 06:45 PM
Annual vaccines, boosters aren't really necessary. The antibodies remain for many years to come. They can cause horrible immune system problems, illness and even death.

Rabies is required by law and depending where you live every 3 years is acceptable.

Vaccinating yearly was something devised to get your money not to make your pets healthy.

Of course this is just my opinion through my own research.

It all does make sense though :thumbs up

Prin
April 21st, 2006, 11:05 PM
My vet recommends rabies shots every 3 years and the distemper "cocktail" every two.

MEB, basically, there are two main types of vaccines- modified live and dead. The modified live is weakened to the point that your immune system should be able to fight it off easily (which is why some elderly people who get the flu shot end up with the flu- they aren't strong enough to kill the modified virus). The dead, is just dead.

I still vaccinate, but I stagger them so they only get one shot within 2 weeks (at least). While fighting off a weak virus isn't uncommon for any organism, fighting off 3 or 4 major pathogens at a time is, and I wouldn't want my babies' bodies to have to fight so hard.

Luba
April 21st, 2006, 11:19 PM
What are the chances of getting lepto, rabies, parvo and heartworm at the same time for a family indoor pet? Slim to none! Oh and I wouldn't touch a flu vaccine with a 100 foot poll, nor any vaccine for that matter.

Titer tests prove antibodies from vaccines remain as 20 years, beyond the average lifespan of most dogs.

Sadie my collie will never be vaccinated again in her life, other then the legally required rabies every 3 years. I hope eventually I won't even have to do that.

2 week windows in between vaccines is not nearly long enough time to rebuild an immune system unforunately.

OntarioGreys
April 22nd, 2006, 09:35 AM
If your pet is indoors and confined to mostly just being in your own yard than it's risk exposure is low, you may be able to get away with not vaccinating, but be very careful about handling other animals yourself because it is possible to carry diseases home with you to your pets for example the canine flu

But if you are fostering , going to dog parks, wilderness camping etc your dog will have high risks of being exposed to diseases and if your are not vaccinating your should be titering to ensure they have protection from diseases, and the impact on health to some of these diseases is far worse than the effects of immunizing

Prin
April 23rd, 2006, 12:32 AM
But if you are fostering , going to dog parks, wilderness camping etc your dog will have high risks of being exposed to diseases and if your are not vaccinating your should be titering to ensure they have protection from diseases, and the impact on health to some of these diseases is far worse than the effects of immunizingI completely agree.:) No matter how rare a disease, there is still a chance. And without provoking too much debate, I'd like to say IMO, people who don't vaccinate are relying in a way on those who do. If everybody stopped, the disease rates would skyrocket.

Look at Quebec this winter- we have had one of the lowest numbers of flu infections in decades, and all because Ontario had free flu shots. So everybody in Qc who didn't get the flu and didn't get the vaccine either, can thank Ontarians. ;)

meb999
April 23rd, 2006, 05:11 PM
hmmmm, what about flea and heartworm meds? Do they cause organ damage??
I don't live in an area where there's a real flea threat....
Plus, I'll probably have to give a seperate flea and heartworm medication (since Buster had a terrible reaction to the all-in-one Revolution -- he drooled BUCKETS, and BUCKETS for 4 days. I had trouble keeping him hydrated, he was drooling so much. And he lost his appetite...)
So much to think about....wouldn't it be simpler if it was winter all-year-round?!! :p

OntarioGreys
April 23rd, 2006, 06:15 PM
I use interceptor as a heartworm preventative and to protect against intestinal parasites, it seems most greyhound do absolutely fine on it, because of low body fat and small kidney and liver size, chemicals are a concern with them, so many flea meds dangerous to them. Revolution has caused a couple dog deaths and apparently very quickly, so definitely do not use again with the reactions he has had As for fleas I have not had a problem with fleas for about 10 years other than once with a foster dog, so I use advantage if fleas show up as a treatment to get rid of rather than as a preventative.

Prin
April 23rd, 2006, 10:58 PM
I use Heartguard Plus only, no flea meds. Pesticides alter DNA which can lead to cancer in high doses or in long term treatments, so it's best to keep exposure as low as possible.:)