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Lunging?!PLEASE HELP!!

lizzieblue
April 20th, 2006, 06:47 PM
Hi all!
I have a question about my 17 week old pup, Buddy.
A few times now he has lunged at my son's face totally unprovoked.
I was there both times, so I know my son didn't do anything to him(he's 11yrs old).
He has in the past lunged at both my husband and I but that hasn't happened recently.
Is this normal puppy behavior or did we get a sketchy dog from the rescue?
I don't know what to do, I have 3 kids ages 4,6,& 11 and I don't want them getting hurt.
PLEASE HELP!!!
Lizzieblue

coppperbelle
April 20th, 2006, 08:51 PM
Hi all!
I have a question about my 17 week old pup, Buddy.
A few times now he has lunged at my son's face totally unprovoked.
I was there both times, so I know my son didn't do anything to him(he's 11yrs old).
He has in the past lunged at both my husband and I but that hasn't happened recently.
Is this normal puppy behavior or did we get a sketchy dog from the rescue?
I don't know what to do, I have 3 kids ages 4,6,& 11 and I don't want them getting hurt.
PLEASE HELP!!!
Lizzieblue

Hi

I don't want to send you into a panic but you need to get some training help for Buddy right away. He is young enough where this behavior can be changed. Give the rescue group a call, maybe they can recommend a trainer that will be able to help you out. If they can't ask around for the name of a good trainer. There are good ones and bad ones so make sure when you find one you are comfortable with him/her.
In the meantime look up NLIF training method. It stands for "nothing in life is free" Basically your puppy has to learn to behave to get what he needs and wants in life. Cesar Milan also has a new book out which has excellent information on dog psychology.

Good luck

tenderfoot
April 20th, 2006, 10:26 PM
I would say totally normal puppy behavior - he doesn't respect your children. It is your job to teach him to respect your kids and the 11 year old can totally learn how to do this too. The younger ones don't have an ego force yet, so they need your help. They are just other puppies to him and he is trying to engage them in play or control them. You need to step in and put a stop to it. I would have him on the leash when he is with the younger kids so you can stop him in a heart beat and correct his bad choices, also be ready to reward the good choices.
Good training will help on all levels as he needs to start having boundaries on his behavior and strict rules to live by. Don't assume he is a bad seed - it is your job to teach him manners, and if you don't then it will feel like the puppy from :evil: moved in to stay.
You will be surprised how quickly he can change with good training.

lizzieblue
April 21st, 2006, 09:33 AM
Thanks for your advice! I will definately get him into training right away.
I'm glad to hear that he's a normal pup!!
It certainly hepls put things in perspective with your expert advice.:thumbs up
Lizzieblue

suebruce
April 21st, 2006, 11:52 AM
I would say totally normal puppy behavior - he doesn't respect your children. It is your job to teach him to respect your kids and the 11 year old can totally learn how to do this too. The younger ones don't have an ego force yet, so they need your help. They are just other puppies to him and he is trying to engage them in play or control them. You need to step in and put a stop to it. I would have him on the leash when he is with the younger kids so you can stop him in a heart beat and correct his bad choices, also be ready to reward the good choices.
Good training will help on all levels as he needs to start having boundaries on his behavior and strict rules to live by. Don't assume he is a bad seed - it is your job to teach him manners, and if you don't then it will feel like the puppy from :evil: moved in to stay.
You will be surprised how quickly he can change with good training.

This post has been timely for me as I just got a panic call from my husband who said that Sam ( 16 week puppy) tried to jump up on our 6 year old so she turned her back on him as we have been told to do by the trainer, and in return he bit her pretty hard on her back. I am not thinking he was doing anything more than seeing if this would engage her in play... and I am thinking this is probably happening for the reasons you stated above Tenderfoot.

My question would be though...how long do you think it would be necessary to do the leash thing... should I be trying to encourage play between the two of them during this time so as to provide opportunities for good choices? If I start to see good choices right away, should I remove the leash...?

It was interesting to me that last night when we were out on our walk Sam didn't do any of this with our daughter even though he certainly had the opportunty? I am wondering as well, if he is thinking he can get away with more when I am not home? My husband is finally able to come to puppy class this Saturday and Sunday, which I think may help.

I am not overly concerned at this point.... but my daughter is "daddy's little" girl so I know he is very protective of her and may not be looking at this objectively, but at the same time... Sam should never think this is acceptable.

sprayeddog
April 21st, 2006, 12:01 PM
I 100% agree with tenderfoot. For a 16 weeks puppy it's perfectly normal for him to "play" with your son by jumping at him, getting his paw in his face, nipping him and lundging at him. That's how dogs play and to him, your son is just another dog.

This is a good chance to train your son as well as your dog. Your son can play with your dog, and I'd suggest to put the dog on a leash and be ready. If he jumps at your son or nips him or do any of those things, you can quickly stop him with the leash, and your son can turn around, don't look at the dog, and cross his arms and say "Bad dog. Bad dog.". You may control your dog with a leash, and when the dog calms down (or you or your son may ask him to sit or down) then your son can play with him again.

After a few times he'll learn that when he jumps at your son all games and funs stop. He'll realize human do not play like that, and the only way for him to play is to stop doing all that.

As soon as the dog consitently makes the right choice to not to jump or nip, then you can lose the leash and let the kid and the dog play together.



SD

LianneCatherine
April 25th, 2006, 10:30 AM
I have the same problem with my Yorkie. She lunges at everyone and bites their noses/faces. On the one hand she's just super excited and being crazy, on the other hand it's really annoying and sometimes really hurts. If you find a way to get yours to stop, I'd love some advice!

sprayeddog
April 25th, 2006, 11:53 AM
I think you can keep teaching them not to, but in Matty's case, all I can do is step on his leash and tell him not to jump to greet other people. I've also asked the guest to turn away if he jumps, and give him a treat if they sit ... Matty's first reaction is still to jump at people when he meets new friends.

Then I met an owner with a 4 yr old lab the other day and she said their lab was EXACTLY like that when he was young ... but as he turned 2~2.5 yrs old, he just calmed down and doesn't get as excited or jump at ppl anymore.

So part of that is age ... I'll keep discouraging him to jump at ppl but at the end of the day when he's a pup he's a pup.

Me and Kayla
April 26th, 2006, 06:58 AM
My suggestion would be to get a trainer to come into your home to train your children and yourselves within an environment that you are all familiar with. They can see first hand what the problems are and help you correct them. We have a trainer that comes to the house once in awhile when new problems arise, to put Kayla and the whole family into 'boot camp'. It's tough to keep the kids on the right path with the training because the dog is always testing them, and my kids are not young children anymore.

Me and Kayla

tenderfoot
April 26th, 2006, 02:37 PM
Sorry I didn't jump on this earlier - I have been away from the computer for a few days.
Teach on leash and then test on a long leash - this way you have the last say and can control the outcome. Your pup might be better around you because he is respecting your leadership and chooses to behave because he knows your boundaries. Without you there he is ready to boss the child around to prove he is in charge in that relationship. A very good reason not to leave kids and dogs alone together.
The puppy is going to go through stages of development that encourage him to challenge the staus-quo - which means that you have to stay on top of things in case he decides to 'up the anti' with the child.
You can teach the dog to play with low energy by teaching 'play' and 'easy' directions when you play with him. Try not to let his energy get too intense when playing, and always be in control of the amount of energy you and the children use when playing with him.
Yes, dogs will mellow with age, but better to teach right from wrong now so accidents don't happen in the mean time.