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neutered dog breeding

Beetlecat
April 20th, 2006, 05:25 PM
My male was neutered when he was just under a year old. He'll be 2 in July.

I was visting my folk's place a week ago and their female dog was in heat. Long story short, he managed to mount her and they tied for a few minutes. Suprised us all.

Now, I've very sure nothing will come of it since he had all the necessary equipment removed almost a year ago, but I want someone to back me up on this, as my mom is quite worried, since she doesn't see how he could actually work everything right if he's properly neutered. And, unless he has a mutant undecended third testical, he is. I've looked, they took it all.

Anyhow, is this a common occurance? And please tell me he's just shooting blanks, as my mom has threatened to give me any resulting puppies so I can take them to the vet who neutered him XO

PetFriendly
April 20th, 2006, 05:32 PM
He's just shooting blanks, kinda like when a man has a vasectomy... No worries

Prin
April 20th, 2006, 05:53 PM
Even more blank than a vasectomy- in a vasectomy, some of the fish can jump the gap (RARELY), but in this case, the fish factories were completely removed. Ain't no fishies left at all!

The 'empty' breeding can happen though. Neutered males around a female in heat are NO fun. They are relentless (just as bad as intact males).

Beetlecat
April 20th, 2006, 06:06 PM
Neutered males around a female in heat are NO fun. They are relentless (just as bad as intact males).

:D In this case, it was more the opposite. It was the female who was doing all the bugging. He was interested in her, but she was doing all the work, playing with him, following him, actually being happy to see him. She is the dominent one in that relationship and is usually much more standoffish and snappy.

He just seemed overjoyed (and perhaps a little confused) that she actually wanted him around for once :D

Anyhow, I'll tell my mom not to worry. And me too for that matter, I'm too young to be a grandma XD

jawert1
April 20th, 2006, 06:36 PM
Can I ask the dumb and obvious question why isn't your parent's dog spayed? Then there will be no accidents, no matter who's shooting what :: shrug ::

Prin
April 20th, 2006, 07:08 PM
Can I ask the dumb and obvious question why isn't your parent's dog spayed? Then there will be no accidents, no matter who's shooting what :: shrug ::
Good question. :)

coppperbelle
April 20th, 2006, 08:11 PM
Can I ask the dumb and obvious question why isn't your parent's dog spayed? Then there will be no accidents, no matter who's shooting what :: shrug ::

That was my first thought too.

Actually I have heard that neutered males can shoot more than blanks for a little while. Not sure for how long but apparently possible. I would think that a year would be a safe amount of time.

Beetlecat
April 20th, 2006, 08:38 PM
Can I ask the dumb and obvious question why isn't your parent's dog spayed? Then there will be no accidents, no matter who's shooting what :: shrug ::

*grin* I knew this would come up here, but I figured I might as well wait until someone asked.

Long story short, she's a farm dog. There has simply never been any need. She is an only dog. She stays home. My dog is the only one to visit, and he's neutered.

My mom doesn't want pups anymore than anyone here, so why is it an apparent given that her dog 'should' be spayed? *raises eybrows* And the dog's almost 9 now, if she hasn't run off to have coydog pups yet, she's not going to start now.

And, personally, I have problems with just cutting off all the hormones that sexual organs provide. Sure she has a chance of getting ovarian cancer, but so do I. I advocate neutering/spaying only when necessary. That is why I waited until my dog older to have him done.

Prin
April 20th, 2006, 09:44 PM
Hmm... At 9 years old, would you want to take the chance of her getting pregnant? I don't know if she'd survive. And my vet will tell you that a lot of dogs breed when you least expect them to (and you think you know them well).

Ovarian cancer is not the only concern. Pyometra is a much bigger concern and is much more likely and would probably go undetected until it's too late.

As for reproductive hormones, they're stored in the fatty tissues, so it is HIGHLY likely that she has enough stored up at 9 years of age to last her two more lifetimes. There is no physiological need to keep her intact.

Prin
April 20th, 2006, 09:48 PM
Hey, remember this thread?
http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=19615
Okami's dog was 10 years old and intact...

Beetlecat
April 20th, 2006, 10:22 PM
*shakes head* I'm not willing to get into a spay/neuter discussion.

It's been done and 1) I won't change my mind 2) you won't change your mind 3) a waste of time and hurt feelings result.

My original question has been answered, thank you :)

Prin
April 21st, 2006, 02:07 AM
Well, if you know already, why do you have all the wrong arguments? ;) :crazy:

Tigger
April 21st, 2006, 05:28 AM
Original question answered. Thread has run it's course.