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Older cat has lost a pile of weight

jakenash
April 20th, 2006, 02:26 PM
My 16 year old cat that has been overweight for most of her life has lost a substantial amount of weight. She is quite thin now. The whites of her eyes are also a bit red. She still eats and drinks normally. Her urine and bowel movements are just as normal as they always have been. She occassionally vomits a very small amount of food. She is still a very happy purring kitty! But she is skin and bones now. I, like alot of people, can't afford large vet bills. If she appeared to be in pain I wouldn't hesitate. But I am concerned. If you have any ideas I'd appreciate it. Thanks.

jessick
April 20th, 2006, 02:32 PM
A simple, relatively cheap blood test could determine what is going on with your kitty. I have a 19 year old who was diagnosed with a thyroid condition about 1.5 years ago, she too became very, very, thin and would throw up small amounts of food/bile. She is now on tapasol (sp?) for the rest of her life at a cost of approx.$52.00 every six weeks

good luck :pawprint:

Prin
April 20th, 2006, 02:53 PM
Definitely needs to see a vet. A consult fee isn't usually back-breaking and at least you'd have somewhere to start.

Lucky Rescue
April 20th, 2006, 02:57 PM
A 16 year old cat who is "skin and bones" needs to see a vet now.

The fact that she's purring is obviously meaningless, since cats will even purr when dying, like your cat is going to die if you don't take her very soon.

jakenash
April 21st, 2006, 08:43 AM
My 16 year old cat that has been overweight for most of her life has lost a substantial amount of weight. She is quite thin now. The whites of her eyes are also a bit red. She still eats and drinks normally. Her urine and bowel movements are just as normal as they always have been. She occassionally vomits a very small amount of food. She is still a very happy purring kitty! But she is skin and bones now. I, like alot of people, can't afford large vet bills. If she appeared to be in pain I wouldn't hesitate. But I am concerned. If you have any ideas I'd appreciate it. Thanks.
Thanks for the responses! It's not the cost of the initial tests that concern me. It's all of the expensive ones that follow. I have spent literally thousands of dollars on one of my dogs just to be told that I should really put her down. I didn't and she made a full recovery! I have made an appt for her. Thanks again.

AdoptionPalace
April 21st, 2006, 12:44 PM
I'm sorry to hear about your cat. My mom's cat went through the same thing. Very big "fat" cat for her entire life and then suddenly started getting sick. It was only a short period of time before she became nothing but skin and bones; then she started getting sores from laying down and the bone would rub the skin. Eventually, she went into a coma and died.

My mom spent several thousand dollars on tests only to be told by several vets there was nothing wrong with the cat. She was up to date on all immunizations and had never been sick before. But slowly she wasted away til there was nothing left of her.

I know this doesn't help any but it may just be the cats time. To be 16 she's lived a good, long life and you should be happy she's lived this long. It shows she's had great, loving care.

starr
April 22nd, 2006, 05:23 AM
We wonder if she's in renal failure. This also can produce weight loss. Our cat was very happy and "normal" until just a few weeks ago. You can read my posts in "General", titled "Weird Elderly Cat Behavior".

Our vet first thought it was bad teeth, then arthritic jaw, then possibly thyroid, now we're conteplating kidney failure.

From what I've read, thyroid and kidney failure are the leading causes of weight loss in older cats. Our cat is now 15 and all of our others, except one who had cancer at 13 have lived to be over 16, but still...15 or 16 is about the average for most.

I'd like to see what your vet says as it might help us too.

Good luck,
Starr

starr
April 25th, 2006, 11:35 AM
Please check my thread in the other forum. Our cat is hyper-thyroid which is the second leading cause of weight loss in elderly cats, so I just learned. You might want to check out this possibility because it is entirely "fixable" with medication.:)