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HELP - Dangerously HIGH LEVELS - Cat

lakota
December 8th, 2003, 12:40 PM
My MALE cat, Harley has been on the following meds for the last few days so far:

denosyl (once a day)
actigall (once a day_
metronidizol (once a day)
amoxycillan (twice a day)

He lost a lot of weight over the last few weeks. He went from 10 pounds to 7.5. He is not eating much. He looks a little yellowish in the skin tone. Eyes look distant except when he looks at me pleadingly.

His blood results showed his white blood cell count as HIGH. His liposites (SP?) VERY HIGH! A few other levels were HIGH too.

The vet (my first time with her as aresult of moving) said it could be:

Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Cancer
Kidney Failure
Liver Disease

He's had an x-ray which looks good. Might need an ultrasound.

He puts up a good fight when medicating him (which I keep hoping is a good sign).

I am not sure if there is anything else I can do to fatten him up, change the levels. Any suggestions. I am desperate! Thank you!!!

lakota
December 8th, 2003, 12:45 PM
I forgot to mention that I have been feeding him ANYTHING he wants...tuna fish, soft iams cat food, 9 lives, baby food, chicken pieces, rice...everything and anything he wants!

lakota
December 8th, 2003, 02:59 PM
The vet just called. She suggested a few things, ultrasound, feeding tube, biopsy (although, she's not sure if he could handle sedation)...and then she could diagnose. I asked about treating him as if he had Inflammatory Bowel Disease and she said it's not a bad idea. She could administer a shot of cortizone. That way if it is IBD, it'll help a lot. If it is cancer, it could help a little bit. It'll stimulate his appetite either way, which would be a VERY good thing. He has permanent liver damage. No vomitting and no diaharia.

The bottom line, I do not want to put my cat through chemo or any other long-term treatment that would make him feel sick and miserable. I want him to have quality, not quantity. He's about 15 years old. I've had him since he was a kitten. I am not giving up on him yet though. He has some kick!

Any ideas or suggestions of what it could be or how to treat him or how to get him to eat more would be greatly appreciated. Any pearls of wisdom. Thanks!

Lucky Rescue
December 8th, 2003, 06:19 PM
YOu really need to know what is causing your cat's symptoms, and if the reason is not eating is because he is in pain.

I'm sure you don't want to put a 15 yr old cat through any invasive or uncomfortable procedures, especially if his condition is terminal.
At his age, I agree that quality (of time left) is more important than quantity.

You might try feeding him something very smelly and tempting, like canned salmon or tuna, to stimulate his appetite.

Let us know how he does!

Carina
December 8th, 2003, 09:20 PM
Aww...does he seem relatively happy & content now? Or is he getting quiet & withdrawn, not wanting to eat...?

If it's the latter, I'd do what Lucky suggests...try to get him to eat but don't do anything heroic, medically. I know it is difficult when they're old, trying to decide how to handle illness.

One thing I've realised is that many animals are much more stoic than we humans are, about pain. They can quietly endure pain and discomfort that would completely unhinge a person. If there is a great deal of discomfort and sadness for an animal, it can be better to err on the side of letting them go sooner than later...

Hope I'm not being upsetting, talking about this! I don't mean to be, at all. Just realistic.
I had a friend whose elderly Cocker Spaniel got some sort of inner ear cancer. Her vet (I'm thinking he was behind on his boat payments) had her run up her dog-emergency credit card to the $5,000 limit. That five grand bought 13 year old Tess about 4 more months of life...but during that time she had two operations, was on chemo, and was not a very happy little dog for her last few months.

Anyhow, I think the cortisone is a great idea, it sure can't hurt. That alone might help stimulate his appetite.
Canned mackerel is something my cat just adores - and if it's slightly warmed up it smells stronger too. Might be more enticing that way.
Do keep us posted...here's hoping Harley kicks a little butt and feels better soon!

mona_b
December 8th, 2003, 09:22 PM
I agree with the quality of life not the quantity.And at 15 he seems to have had a great life.But think about it.He has perminate liver damadge and he is in pain.He is on all these meds.I know you have had him since a baby.And he is a part of your life.But do you want him to continue to suffer?I think maybe it is time to let him go.I am so sorry for saying that.But I went through something like that 3 years ago with my 13 year old cat Mousie.I had him since he was 7 weeks.It's hard to watch an animal suffer.And I could see it in his eyes.He was suffering.And when I took him to the vets once last time.He looked up at me as to say thank you mommy.It was the hardest thing to do.But I know in my heart I did the right thing.

Luba
December 9th, 2003, 02:00 AM
Some of the medications you mention
Metro/Amoxil are used specifically for infections or invasive parasites. This has nothing to do with cancer or organ disease.

You mentioned biopsy but you didn't indicate of what?

Carina
December 9th, 2003, 04:20 AM
Originally posted by Luba
Some of the medications you mention
Metro/Amoxil are used specifically for infections or invasive parasites. This has nothing to do with cancer or organ disease.

You mentioned biopsy but you didn't indicate of what?

Since the vet can't pinpoint Harley's problems, seems like she's taking a "kitchen sink" approach, trying to make him better. Poor kitty!

lakota
December 9th, 2003, 02:26 PM
First, thank you very much for all of the kind words and advice. I appreciate it very much.

Harley had a shot of cortisone last night and is eating more and drinking more water.

All of the meds he is on are to help with his liver and his white blood cell count...to combat infection and disease which he does have. There is a strong possibility of IBD. The cortisone will help greatly if that is the case. Right now, I am trying to fatten him up a little bit. I will not let him suffer. He is not the happiest right now, but if there is a chance of improvement, I believe I will see it in the next day or so. Otherwise, I know I will have to take the next step to eliminate pain and suffering permanently.

Harley is a gentleman. He always moves aside when the ladies decide to eat...which has forced me to feed him alone. I cannot imagine his sister being without him. They have always been a unit.

I will keep you all posted. Thank you again.

lakota
December 9th, 2003, 02:30 PM
The biopsy would be to check for Inflammatory Bowel Disease. But, that is done by examining the lining of the intestines. He would not make it through that procedure at the moment. I have another cat who has IBD and she is something of a miracle. I have 4 cats and they are all 13 - 15 years old. I had 6 cats, a dog and a ferret at one time. They are all at that age or were at that age...and, it's hard. Thanks again!

mona_b
December 9th, 2003, 02:33 PM
Your very welcome lakota.That's why we are here.To help as much as we can.

It's good to hear that he is eating and drinking more.

Yes,please keep us posted.:)

Lucky Rescue
December 9th, 2003, 03:42 PM
They are all at that age or were at that age...and, it's hard. Thanks again!

Yes, it's extemely hard. I had a 17 and 20 year old cat, and a 14 year old dog and lost them all in a matter of weeks.:(

I was offered various procedures or meds to try and help them, but I didn't want their last days to filled with pain and fear, so when their enjoyment of life left them, I did what was necessary but it nearly killed me.

We know how you feel!

Luba
December 9th, 2003, 04:59 PM
Poor Kitty

Those antibiotics alone can make him ill and cause problems with liver function.

Call you vet and ask specifically WHY on the antibiotics?

If your vet doesn't know, I'd go elsewhere!!

If your cat does have IBD then feeding everything and anything is not a good idea. Stick to a specific food that the cat tolerates mostly.

There are many vets which practice natural remedies as well.

I know it's hard but be persistent and ask questions, make notes.

Luba