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Heartworms?

shelly75
March 28th, 2006, 05:19 PM
As this is the first spring I have my dog French-fry I am knew to preventing heartworms.

My vet has suggested Revolution from what I did find on the net it seems to me that I have to apply this to her and its not a pill? am I right? is this good for long hair dogs? (lhasa apso)

what are some other options?

Also with ticks I frequently bring French fry to where my boyfriend lives wich has lots of ticks other than a flea collar or the revolution (or other alternitive) what are some other ways I can avoid her getting those things?

Prin
March 28th, 2006, 05:22 PM
It's a cream you put between the shoulder blades and it soaks into the skin and into the blood from there.

Personally, I use Heartguard Plus instead. It gets most worms, but not fleas and ticks.

Revolution protects against fleas too, which my dogs never get and I just don't believe in treating something I don't have to. Heartworm is hard to treat when they get it, so that's important to prevent. But to kill insects and worms, you have to use pesticides, and that is what these treatments are.

So if you're really worried about fleas, get revolution. If not, get Heartguard.

momto2
March 28th, 2006, 05:44 PM
On the topic of heartworms, how common is this in dogs? Is it common in cats as well? What are the symptoms? I'm not really familar with this. My dog has always been on Heartguard, he was tested once years ago then I started using this.

shelly75
March 28th, 2006, 07:10 PM
Prin thank you, I will go with the Revolution. I do not want to bring fleas into where my boyfriend lives as he also works there

Prin
March 28th, 2006, 07:17 PM
Heartworm isn't common, but it only takes one mosquito to infect a dog. ;) Even with preventative treatment, they recommend getting a blood test to be sure every 2 years. I think Lucky has seen dogs undergo treatment and she described it somewhere in the forum a while ago. It's no fun.

shelly75, with long-haired dogs, fleas can be harder to treat, so by all means. My dogs are short haired and in 4 years have never had them (knock on wood). :D

Cathy1
March 28th, 2006, 08:58 PM
Duke had heartworm when we first got him in 2003.We took him into the vet to be neutered then the vet told us he was positive. He never showed any symptoms. He spent 5 days at the vet .When he came home his breathing sounded terrible so we took him back to the vets and was there for another 2 days. We also had to keep him calm for 6 weeks. It wound up costing us $1200. but he was worth every bit of it. He now gets preventative and checked every year. Last year he was given the cream but I want to put him back on the pill. I feel safer about it.

Lucky Rescue
March 28th, 2006, 09:31 PM
Yes, my dog was treated for heartworms. Horrible. Get the preventative. I use Heartguard.

Is it common in cats as well?

Cats can get heartworms too, although I"ve never seen any with them that I know of.

The difference is that heartworm cannot be treated in cats and is fatal.

SnowDancer
March 29th, 2006, 12:07 PM
The topical Heartworm/Flea treatment is so much "fun" to apply to long haired dogs! We want the flea treatment as well so will stick with the topical. We adopted an Eskimo in summer 2004 and for first time had to apply it to dog with a double ruff of fur around his neck - trying to find the pink spot of skin and keep it visible while fumbling with the tube is a riot. And of course, best time to administer it is at bedtime - after last walk - can't allow it to get wet. Until Eskie we had short haired dogs - a whole lot easier. Some people decide to go with the chewable Heartworm med for this reason along with a separate flea treatment. Discussed with vet and decided we would continue with the topical. Physical is booked for April 4 - little guy will turn 2 - so fun is about to begin. Enjoy.

shelly75
March 29th, 2006, 12:49 PM
The topical Heartworm/Flea treatment is so much "fun" to apply to long haired dogs! We want the flea treatment as well so will stick with the topical. We adopted an Eskimo in summer 2004 and for first time had to apply it to dog with a double ruff of fur around his neck - trying to find the pink spot of skin and keep it visible while fumbling with the tube is a riot. And of course, best time to administer it is at bedtime - after last walk - can't allow it to get wet. Until Eskie we had short haired dogs - a whole lot easier. Some people decide to go with the chewable Heartworm med for this reason along with a separate flea treatment. Discussed with vet and decided we would continue with the topical. Physical is booked for April 4 - little guy will turn 2 - so fun is about to begin. Enjoy.

Ok I don't think French-fry will mind the putting it on to much but it sounds like I have to apply it to a specific spot? would it maybe be a good idea to trim her hair a little more to do that?

Prin, she is having the test next week and I definetly know I don't want fleas and I sure dont want to have to look for ticks on her either (I have a hard enough time finding them on me and dd letalone a squirming doggy)

Thanks you for all the advice

Beaglemom
March 29th, 2006, 01:18 PM
We have used the topical kind too for flea/tick, worm and heartworm prevention. Our cat is allergic to fleas and just one bite causes her to go into a scratching frenzy which result in bite sores all over her body. Fleas are also a big nuisance to get rid of, especially on long coated breeds.

You have to apply it right on the skin between the shoulder blades. So for a long haired dog, you would just have to split the hair until you see the skin and then apply it.

Here's the website for revolution.
http://www.revolutionpet.com/default.html

Corrie
March 29th, 2006, 01:33 PM
A question....my Charlotte has been on heart worm medication since she was 6 months old...my vets says to keep her on from May till November, and so I do. I just called to renew her perscription and was told she has to have a heartworm test first...is this just a money making thing? If my dog has been on her pills without ever lapsing...why is a test neccessary? Does your vet also require a test before renewing? I can understand if I had been lax or missed months or she was new to me...

Cathy1
March 29th, 2006, 01:40 PM
Every spring when we take Duke in the vet also does a test to be sure he is negative. She also does it in November. I don't know why she does it November too.

Beaglemom
March 29th, 2006, 01:52 PM
A question....my Charlotte has been on heart worm medication since she was 6 months old...my vets says to keep her on from May till November, and so I do. I just called to renew her perscription and was told she has to have a heartworm test first...is this just a money making thing? If my dog has been on her pills without ever lapsing...why is a test neccessary? Does your vet also require a test before renewing? I can understand if I had been lax or missed months or she was new to me...
It is recommended that you have a heartworm blood screening test done every year first before you restart the preventatives. If you live in an area where mosquitoes are a year round thing and your dog/cat takes heartworm medication year round without missing a day, then you probably don't have to get them tested every year. But for those of us who live in areas where mosquitoes are prevalent only spring through fall, then once a year is fine. It is important that your dog/cat is cleared of heartworms before starting the preventative medications to prevent serious complications.

Beautygirl
April 2nd, 2006, 08:50 PM
Just wondering...When I asked at my vet's office about deworming & flea prevention, they reccommended Sentinal. Said that it does both or that I could just have the cheaper pills that only treats for worms. Is Sentinal good or should I ask about something else. They told me most people only treat from May to November I think, but you could treat all year. Is it better to treat all year, or is it okay to just do the 6 month treatment?

mafiaprincess
April 2nd, 2006, 10:40 PM
For those of us who live in the north, ther's no point to give extra meds for no reason. Once it gets cold, no mosquitos.

I gave sentinal last season. I'm looking at revolution this season. With sentinal a flea would have to bite the dog, become sterile and die.. Well it doesn't mean that the dog wouldn't come in with multiple fleas to crawl on her and me.. In the fall the flea problem was pretty bad. I ended up getting 2 months worth of frontline to deal with the flea problem. Not worth the hassle this year for us.

Lucky Rescue
April 2nd, 2006, 10:41 PM
My dog is on Heartguard for half the year only since no mosquitos in the winter.

I don't treat for fleas unless I see them. Don't want to give any more pesticides than are needed.

Prin
April 2nd, 2006, 11:06 PM
Once the first major frost hits, it's pretty much the end of mosquitoes, so giving a pill more than a month after that is pretty much a waste of time (the pills are retroactive- they kill the worms from the 30 days prior).