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Want to hear all opinions on Farm pets

erykah1310
March 20th, 2006, 10:57 PM
I have read some interesting post on this website, not looking to start up a battle of opinion, however just to ease my curiosity, was wondering how most of you felt about the traditional "farm dog" and "barn cats" ?

Should this thread be removed i understand, quite a controversial topic and im sure that there are going to be some very very strong opinions.

However living in an extreme rural area (as i do) its a daily occurance to see feral barn cats hiding in ditches and "old farm dogs" walking through the fields and waiting by mail boxes for the daily "cookie" from the mail man.

It kinda reminds me of the old Lassie type movies. (just more traffic now a days)

Should no one reply to this thread I will understand why, I too ignore alot of posts for extreme controversy.

Take care everyone.

Prin
March 20th, 2006, 11:09 PM
My cousin had a farm with farm dogs and by the time I was 12, I was beginning my second pair of dogs and she was on her 16th dog. Nuff said.;)

OntarioGreys
March 21st, 2006, 12:06 AM
My aunt and uncle have a farm, the feral barn cats are just that, she is not going out and adopting them and putting them in the barn, they are strays that find there way there looking for shelter, in bad weather and winter when finding food is hard she feeds them, they are not pets but she wont let them just suffer etiher, Occassionally she will make one of the kittens as a pet, they are then spay neutered and vaccinated and become strictly housecats. The farmdogs are first confined and she takes them out to train them and teach them their boundaries, before allowing them loose, mostly they stay near the house but will run up the lane if someone in coming or will go back to the field only went someone is with them, in bad or in really cold weather they are allowed indoors they are also neutered, though a few would rather remain out in their insulated dog house, her dogs have had good long lives , with the exception of one it had thunderphobia and she was in the city when a storm came up suddenly and she was not able to get home in time, the dog took off, she spent several weeks out daily searching for the dog after but unfortunately never found him. If she had known a storm was coming she would have stayed home with him indoors like every time before.

It is not about where you live that will make you a good pet owner it's about responsibility for their care and welfare

mom_to_many
March 21st, 2006, 12:27 AM
My mom had a small farm in Colorado and had 3-4 female calicos(barn cats) who were not spayed. She had taken in 1 or 2 females to be spayed and they left after coming back home...no more spays after that :sad: End result was many trips to the Dumb Friends League if the babies survived the toms, horses and elements. I know when they sold the place, there were at least 6 cats left. Whether they stayed or went the DFL, I do not know. Barn cats are great tho...provided they have food, water, and a hay stall for warmth. Mom's were quite content. Just wish they had been fixed.

canine14
March 21st, 2006, 12:41 AM
Totally agree with OntarioGreys. I have a farm and 4 dogs. Most people around here have at least 3 dogs and most of these dogs were found after being dumped in our rural area. There are a few uneducated people with chained dogs, but their attitude towards animals is appalling: you should see their manure-caked dairy cows. Barn, i.e. feral, cats can live wonderful lives, but they need to be vaccinated and fixed. I have seen barn kittens and horses nuzzling and I even adopted two kittens (with horrible URI's) who were bonded to a pot-bellied pig who kept them warm. I am on my own personal crusade to help the farmers I know before they end up with a feral cat colony.

mom_to_many
March 21st, 2006, 12:51 AM
Totally agree with OntarioGreys. I have a farm and 4 dogs. Most people around here have at least 3 dogs and most of these dogs were found after being dumped in our rural area. There are a few uneducated people with chained dogs, but their attitude towards animals is appalling: you should see their manure-caked dairy cows. Barn, i.e. feral, cats can live wonderful lives, but they need to be vaccinated and fixed. I have seen barn kittens and horses nuzzling and I even adopted two kittens (with horrible URI's) who were bonded to a pot-bellied pig who kept them warm. I am on my own personal crusade to help the farmers I know before they end up with a feral cat colony.

Good luck with the crusade, it might take alot of convincing for those farmers to spay, as I know ;)

BMDLuver
March 21st, 2006, 06:36 AM
When we had our farm in Niagara, my old gal Selena had run of the property. She would head out the back door in the morning, run up to the barn, help with the chores of escorting the livestock out, then assume her position atop of the hill to survery all that went on during the day. She was never forced to stay out, she loved the great outdoors. She was road trained, meaning that she would never go to the forest across the street, she knew the end of the driveway was the boundary to never be crossed. Selena lived to be 14 and we think that moving back to the city from the country was when she gave up as it was only 3 months after our move that we had to say goodbye to her. Friends on a neighbouring farm have two goldens and their lives are the same. Comfy sofa when they wish, great outdoors when they want to be. Being a farm dog can be a great life provided they are kept safe, well loved and cared for. It's the chained to doghouse one's that need correcting.

phoenix
March 21st, 2006, 07:59 AM
I grew up on a farm. Our dogs were always strictly outdoors (except on cold cold evenings when they came in by the fire in the kitchen). They had an insulated home in the garage. They all lived to old age (14-15) quite happily. They were spayed and vaccinated but they did not come inside often.
These dogs had people with them all the time. The thing about a farm is that the dog isn't outside in a small yard with the people all in watching tv. The people are out doing work most of the time, and the dog feels as if it is a huge part of that. Dogs with jobs are very happy. Of course, we always had mixed breeds with long warm coats who did well outside. And, if one were injured, they saw the vet just as our large animals did (one was hit by the tractor once).

Our cats made good friends with the horses, snuggled in the hay, and ratted and moused to their hearts content. They were not wanderers; they were always around. I do regret that we never fixed those cats and there were lots of kittens. It wasn't part of the lifestyle to pay to spay a cat. However, when my sister and I were older, we had the 2 females spayed and that was the end of that. No new cats moved in either.

It is not the same life as my spoiled two indoor guys have today. My parents dog is now 15 and you can see that he is not long for the world. He spends a lot more time indoors now (as does my dad). How sad that we all get old. But I don't think for one minute that that dog did not enjoy his life completely.

chico2
March 21st, 2006, 08:16 AM
Having never lived on a farm:sad:I cannot speak from experience,but there are bad and good owners in every lifestyle.
I am sure a well cared for farm cat/dog is a very happy animal,a responsible owner is the key in any situation.

Writing4Fun
March 21st, 2006, 02:32 PM
LOL! I was fully expecting to come in here and see questions about keeping roosters as pets in the city! :D

Skryker
March 21st, 2006, 02:39 PM
there are bad and good owners in every lifestyle.
I am sure a well cared for farm cat/dog is a very happy animal,a responsible owner is the key in any situation.

I completely agree. My family on both sides were farmers; although the dogs and cats were not considered "pets" but working members of the farm family, they were well looked after and vetted as often as the livestock. ;) I have to say, though, most of these not-pets were awfully spoiled...as far as all the loving stories I grew up hearing about them go. :D And my Mom has tons of stories about orphaned wildlife babies that were raised on the farm. Now, they were often pets, as they served no function on the farm, if they did not return to the wild when old enough.

But my grandfather didn't believe in pets. :rolleyes: Yup, that's why I never remember him without a dog at his heels or a cat on his lap-years after the farm was no longer a working farm.

amber416
March 21st, 2006, 03:05 PM
Having never lived on a farm:sad:I cannot speak from experience,but there are bad and good owners in every lifestyle.
I am sure a well cared for farm cat/dog is a very happy animal,a responsible owner is the key in any situation.


Yep, I agree. My rescue works only with feral cats (or "feral" cats...those that are dumped outside by former owners, excetera) and we adopt out the truly feral ones to outdoor homes, after having them vaccinated and spayed. These outdoor homes are farmers who pay a small adoption fee and sign one of our adoption contracts stating they will give the cat proper shelter, food and water, and vet care. The cats are then mousers and get to live the life they were accustomed to, yet they are cared for and are unable to contribute to the feral cat overpopulation problem. These are examples of great farm homes, and I believe these cats live very happy lives.

However, when I was in high school, my best friend lived on a farm and that would be an example of a terrible farm pet situation. When the family dogs were too old or if they got sick, they were taken into the woods and shot. There was zero vet care and no animals were spayed or neutered. They were overrun with cats and kittens that often starved or died in poor weather...finding dead kittens was not out of the ordinary there. When new litters of kittens were found, they were "taken care of". It was a very sad place.

So it is definitely true that outdoor farm homes and indoor pet homes are the same in that you can have terrible and wonderful owners in both situations.

Bushfire2000
March 21st, 2006, 03:05 PM
I am a farmer.
I have four dogs. Two are couch potatoes, one is a strictly outside dog, and the fourth can't make up her mind if she wants to be on the couch or in the corral. My dogs all see the vet on a regular basis. And when injured receive imediate care.

I have one (feral) cat in the barn she is not nuetered but if I could actually catch her she would be. I think she's a female no actul proof other than she's still here and a male woould have moved on. I like having several cats on the premises to keep the rodent population down. However Mavis disagrees and will not tolerate any more cats in the yard.

I have to agree that it's the owner that makes it a good life for the animmal not where it lives.

I personally won't have an animal that can't be on a leash. Mavis hates being confined in any way. If I go into the box stall, in the barn, she'll come for hugs and kisses, but if I move towards the door she beats me to it and is always concerned that she will be shut in. If I need to put a leash on her though she is quite content to let me, and behaves beautifully.

Prin
March 21st, 2006, 04:55 PM
I have to agree that it's the owner that makes it a good life for the animmal not where it lives.
I agree with this. But I don't think that dogs who are outside alone all day and night are aware of what happens if they cross the street alone one too many times (city or country).

CyberKitten
March 22nd, 2006, 12:07 AM
It soooo depends on the farmer - as I have often noted, my dad's parents - who both had other jobs- had a small farm and had many many pets - and my gram had a feral cat colony tho we did not call it such then. Those were the best fram animals I have ever seen cared for and I am biased but I have seen some other fram animals and have been just raging angry at how their animals were cared for - or not cared for!!

I think the vet must have ran a tab for my grandparents- he was there so much, lol Even the chickens had names and certainly the lambs did - and they were never raised or food, welll we did eat the eggs but the cows e=were dairy cows and they too had names and personalities. As for cats and dogs that were not feral, they all lived INSIDE where they belonged tho there was a notion they had some job to do but were very well cared for. By the time I arrived, I cannot recall the dogs having any jobs tho, in retrospect, lol Other than herding - one was a border collie. Buster - my dad's fav dg - used to take us when we weere toddlers on a sleigh. My dad used to feed the cats directly from the one of the cows (she was such a great cow when you milked her and I was so afraid to hurt her!!) and the milk would fo right into their mouths (this was before we knew cats were lactose intolerant , it was the days when one associateed a Normal Rovkwell painting of a kitten with a saucer of milk). Evey cat knew when the milking was being done, lol But even the mopstferal eventually emnded up inside - my grandfather was most understanding of my grandmother's "obsesssion" with cats. My dad never said he adored cats but almost every pict of him as a child, even as a tean was with a cat, usually two cats. There is even one of him when he was dating my mom and he was holding two cats, lol He always said you had to have two so they could play together and is forever telling me my cats are too skinny (They're no, they are svelte, Siamese and Sphnx) and not overweight!! And they drink cat's milk!! Or the kind made for cats!

jiorji
March 22nd, 2006, 01:15 AM
I'd like a goat if anyone's taking orders on farm animals :D

Lucky Rescue
March 22nd, 2006, 03:19 PM
Around here, many farm cats are intact, usually sick or injured, semi-starved, and breeding non stop. The farmers will NOT allow us to spay/neuter them even for free, and when the population gets too big, they dispose them in any number of inhumane ways - shooting, drowning, poisoning...:(

mastifflover
March 22nd, 2006, 03:30 PM
LOL! I was fully expecting to come in here and see questions about keeping roosters as pets in the city! :D
So did I, can't fool us for long
I agree it is all about the people

CyberKitten
March 22nd, 2006, 03:54 PM
Roosters as pets in the city??? You will definitely HAVE to explain that one to me - I don't get it? :confused:

I liked being on a small farm - not the work tho but I was young when my grandparents got out of the biz. When my parents married, they had the one cow that I recall and my mom - who must've been brought up with the cleanliness is next to Godliness line - is obsessed with cleanliness. She used to wash Bessie (that was our dairy cow's name) 's udders if you can imagine but she was a great cow!! And she did moo - I think it was fun to be a kid and know when you read in a book about cows going moo that you had the real thing at home, lol Bessie also resided in a heated barn so she was not cold - but I often worried (you know how kids are) if she was on really cold nights but my mother would not let me bring her in the house, lol (speaking of roosers in the city) - she said Bessie had hay and a barn with electricity. My dad was an animal rights advocate always and he hated to see any creature suffer and hated himself to be cold so hence the heated barn. My mom - who was brought up in the city by two doctors and attended private school - was not thrilled to be operating a farm which is prob why we ended up moving to an urban area before long, lol But she was very good to Bessie and to our cats and she cried when our dog died.

My grandmother brought many of her County Galway ways with her and so she did everything from scratch. (My dad is lot like that now - uses wood from his own woodlot to make a desk from scratch!). Gram made her own soap, chured butter from the milk her dairy cows gave us, had a loom and took wool from the sheep (clipped very gently!!! and only in warm weather) to make wool blankets. I still have some of them. I always took that for granted but now I think it's pretty kewl. Those were skills I would not normally have ever learned anywhere else - tho our community college offers a course on that now - how to use a loom. They even had this superb wood stove - purcahsed from Levis Quebec, and it was so warm!! She even baked bread in that thing. My grandparents with their farm and self suffiient skills kept half their village going during the depression - they had food when many did not so they shared with the neighbours and gram was a midwife when women could not affiord a doctor (This was before medicare and Tommy Douglas and Justice Hall - it amazes me even more that I got to meet both of those men and like some sentimental soul, I saved every Christmas card I rec'd from Tommy Douglas and his family!! He was always quoting Robert Frost (the Road Lest Travelled was one of the cards - I had not heard that poem until then so now I associate it with Tommy, lol). Never got to meet Kiefer tho, lol (I think he is younger than me, heheh).

Still, she always talked about the good old days and as a child, I would wonder how a time that included a major depression, a war and lots of other hardships - she told me about one woman in the village who froze to death b/c someone left the door open and she could not get up to close it (Temps were colder back then - to some extent) and of course many people did not have electricity never mind central heat!! I never posed that delicate question to he though - it seemed too impertinent!

But yep, I think it depends on the farmers and there is this trend now towards factory farms. My grandparents and the folks they knew were very upset when they heard about farners who abused or ill cared for their animals - they would absolutely hate factory farming which seems to have no humanity at all. Sigh!

chico2
March 22nd, 2006, 04:58 PM
Lucky,that is exactly the experience I had...:sad:
I stayed on my Uncles farm some summers as a kid,when kittens were born,he used to throw them against a wall to kill them,still to this day,I remember my hysterics over this evil deed.
Then resently,the rancher in Alberta who shot any dog that was sick or no use to him anymore:sad:

Melei'sMom
March 22nd, 2006, 07:08 PM
I'd like a goat if anyone's taking orders on farm animals :D


I always theaten my kids when the are being brats that I am going to trade them for goats :evil: don't tell them we aren't allowed to have farm animals in town or they may catch on that I never will ;)


I grew up on a 'farm' of sorts and we had 2 well trained dogs that were not in the house unless the weather was really bad, my dad built them a heated and carpeted dog house right beside the back door. We also had 1 huge nuetered tabby that kept all other cats of the property. but we were lucky to grow up in an area that the farms surrounding us also believed in proper animal care and all the cats and dogs we saw were healthy and happy.

I agree that it all about the people...and you will find good and bad owners in all walks of life...farm or urban.
All we can do is be the best pet owners we can, and teach others to do the same. and those we can't teach....tie them out with a chain in a snowstorm and see if they like it!!:highfive:

**edited cause i suck at spelling lol

Cymba's friend
March 22nd, 2006, 08:50 PM
Well I don't live on a farm but spend lots of time at a farm where my 2 horses board, and I love shovelling manure and playing with the neighbour farm dogs and cats. I was born in a very big city (Rio de Janeiro, Brasil) - and my observation is that you can have great and also appalling attitudes and treatments in both worlds. There may be some farmers who treat their animals with negligence, but there are also those who treat them very well, super well, even if they are often more free outside. Some of the most appalling animal scenes have been in the city, not to mention that it is often the city people that dump their dogs or cats in the country, when it is not off an autoroute ... so human nature can be quite disappointing at times, in both country and city. And when you get into developing countries, like in South America where I grew up, there are things you see that make even the less fortunate farm-creatures seem like kings and queens - and it breaks your heart.

OntarioGreys
March 22nd, 2006, 09:14 PM
Around here, many farm cats are intact, usually sick or injured, semi-starved, and breeding non stop. The farmers will NOT allow us to spay/neuter them even for free, and when the population gets too big, they dispose them in any number of inhumane ways - shooting, drowning, poisoning...:(


But look at how many city folks are no better, they don't bother to spay or neuter, so then when the cat or dog is expecting, many are either dumped in a pound or dumped out in the countryside, very few farmers ever have to go out and adopt or buy cat and dogs, mostly they are animals that city folks dumped and then turned up on their property.
considering what the alternatives for those dumped animals if the farmer does not let the cats stay in the barn or if they do not take the dog and provide a home for it and provide daily food and attention even if they are not getting the best of medical care, the alternate would be exposure to the elements, and possibly becoming prey for other wildlife, and the mom that is pregnant will give birth but since having not grown up feral, she will likely perish along with the litter. So in a lot of the cases the rural pet population is born from the city dwelller irresponsibility. I know one person who now owns 4 dogs, all of which where dumped and found their way to her place , two in the last year were pregnant females, she took in the dogs in and fed them, looked after them and the pups till weened and then finds home for as many as she can, any of the remaining goes to a non kill shelter. She has had to take the burdens of financial and emotional costs for anmials that were the original owners responsibility, most likely that owner went out and brought home a new animal and will repeat the same crap all over.

Out on the farms the cats do become feral, which means they are now wild animals but have a place to shelter in, unlike the city feral population, nature controls the population since the cat population depending on the food they can catch and they will also be exposed to predators and disease, nature therefore keeps the population in check, The farmers do reconginize the need for having breeding cats without they could lose their cat population and be overrun with rodents instead. They also know if the cats become dependent on them for food than they won't be effective in doing the job of ridding the farm of rodents a farmer see them as wild natural predators that rid their farms of vermin and therefore help to keep crop damage doe,grain supply free of disease for their livestock, as well as themselves http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/spb/mnpages/HPS_Brochure.pdf. The feral cat colony becomes are very much a necessity to farming, the farmers also know there are limits that is safe before disease wipes thru the cat colony, so they may cull some to ensure a healthy population remains, often the cull occurs when a virus hits rather than allowing the kittens to die a slow death, the cull shortens their suffering, maybe the methods could used be improved upon. I am not saying what the farmer does is right or wrong, what I do understand is their perception of the cats, is different from someone who views them as pets

In the city the feral cats become scavengers instead of hunters and learn to feed on garbage, which means most do have pretty regular access to food, the predator population inside a city is low, not a lot of hawks, coyotes and wolves, so other than disease and the risk of getting hit by cars, the feral cat populations can grow quite quickly and able to get much easily out of control than the farm population does.

One option if you want to help with the feral farm population, talk maybe to some vets to see if there is a very inexpensive method to euthanize the sick kittens with little as possible suffering that the farmers can do at home and then discuss that method with the farmers so that they can provide more humane methods. . But inorder for you to consider this as an option, you need to keep a mindset that these are wild cats, not pets that the farmer offered shelter to, in exchange for keeping the rodent population under control.


One of my Cats Umbra came from the MARS Cat rescue, it is a no kill shelter, as you yourself have probably found some of the feral cats that you rescue probably do not respond well to socialization and will never make the best of pets, this is the case with many of the feral cats that this rescue has saved off the street, the cats are all vaccinated and neutered beforehand, but for them to get more of the cats off the street they realized certain ones were not well suited for adoption and therefore were taking up space in foster homes that could be used for the feral cats that are still on the street that could become great pets, so they starting offering them as barn cats, the only condition they asked is that the farmer put out some food during the bad parts of winter when hunting is difficult. see bottom of the page is the feral info
http://www3.sympatico.ca/marscats/Rescues.htm It is a suituation were a rescue learned to work with farmers instead of against allowing them to rehome more cats without their rescues contributing to overpopulation.

I am not at all suggesting in any way that you do the same, each of us have to make choices we can live with, just presenting different views.

mom_to_many
March 23rd, 2006, 10:11 AM
Roosters as pets in the city??? You will definitely HAVE to explain that one to me - I don't get it? :confused:

Spend a month at my house (in town) in the summer when the windows are open at night....Roosters are every where here, and they CANNOT tell time!!!:mad:

Their sunrise is at 3, 4, maybe 5 AM....if I'm lucky!! lol

doggy lover
March 23rd, 2006, 10:50 AM
Here is my rescue barn cat, she is now an indoor cat and fixed. I have heard like LR said animals being destroyed in inhumane ways, but yes it happens in the city too.

We are lucky and have 16 acres of property up north and my last dog was allowed to run the property, as he mostly stayed with us and would never go towards the road which is 1000 feet down the driveway. Now Tucker has a habit of wondering so he in on a long line, that is attached to trees with a leash that is attached to him so he has lots of room to run around. We take him for 2 walks a day up there on a long line, and play ball for hours with him on the long line.

Tucker came from a working farm, his mom and dad where both sheep herders, and the breeder did tell us that she had lost dogs on the road near her before. I don't ever want the same thing to happen to him that is why he is leashed, our friends also lost his sister from a previous litter to the road so this is why it scares me so much. I believe many dogs and cats that live in rural areas end up dead this way. I don't think these people want their pets to get hurt, but it just seems like they hate to tie them up and the consequences are they get hit if they run the roads. I'd rather tie up Tucker and have him live to a ripe old age.

Mom_Of_Two_Dogs
March 23rd, 2006, 11:16 AM
I'm fine with the idea of barn cats and farm dogs, as long as they are spayed/neutered/vaccinated and generally looked after just as well as housepets :)

Lucky Rescue
March 23rd, 2006, 11:22 AM
But look at how many city folks are no better, they don't bother to spay or neuter, so then when the cat or dog is expecting, many are either dumped in a pound or dumped out in the countryside

Of course it happens everywhere, but the topic here is farm animals. We know the cats are dumped on the farmers, and wanted to help by s/n them for free. These farmers don't want them sterilized and seem to prefer to kill them. They do the same with their dogs.

doggy lover
March 23rd, 2006, 11:30 AM
I have heard of people drowning puppies or shooting their dogs because they are sick, how they know what is wrong I don't know but they don't want to pay to find out. They shoot their old dogs too, the thought of it makes me sick. When Travis got bloat it cost me alot of money and a guy that I knew (and hate) told me it would have cost me 35 cents for a bullet. I said yeah make sure you get two because I'd use the next one on you:mad: I had also heard this same guy shot a dog that he was mad at for going potty in his house. Thats the kind of people that make me sick. The funny thing is that a shelter gave him a purebred golden a few month later, I wish I had been there I would have told them what had happen to his last dog.

Bushfire2000
March 23rd, 2006, 12:28 PM
Of course it happens everywhere, but the topic here is farm animals. We know the cats are dumped on the farmers, and wanted to help by s/n them for free. These farmers don't want them sterilized and seem to prefer to kill them. They do the same with their dogs.

I've approached local rescues and asked if they had any cats that were unsuited to be pets but were spayed/neutered and would be suitable for a farm. They either wouldn't answer me and ignored the question or they thought I was nuts and had alterior(sp) motives, (don't ask me what they thought I was going to do with them. I'm sure I don't know) I don't want cats that are intact, I don't want to kill cats or kittens.

Lucky Rescue
March 23rd, 2006, 12:38 PM
I've approached local rescues and asked if they had any cats that were unsuited to be pets but were spayed/neutered and would be suitable for a farm.

We've placed lots of feral cats in barns - good barns with adequate shelter and with people who will feed and care for them.

I don't understand why you were turned down if you offered a good home to cats who are otherwise unadoptable.:(

Bushfire2000
March 23rd, 2006, 11:33 PM
I don't understand either. It was as though nobody had ever asked them before. And it wasn't as though I wanted them for free either I would have paid the adoption fee. Too late now, I'm turning away cats now. Mavis doesn't like them.

PEDPA
March 24th, 2006, 12:54 AM
I was thinking before i read the post... so what a pet pig? a pet goat? seen it all! lol. I don't think theres anything wrong with farm pets... as i can see from most of the posts, most people have had them and now look..... we're all animal lovers combining to make a succesful site!:thumbs up

OntarioGreys
March 24th, 2006, 06:45 AM
Because the topic of how a farmers kills unwanted animals has come up, I am going to apologize for going off topic because maybe we need to look at how shelters and pounds get rid of unwanted animals in our community before we start judging the farmer, since the tax dollars we pay are going towards supporting the practices of euthanasia in our communities


What many of you may not realized is that many cities and towns contract out Animal Control services to shelters and pounds to pick up stray animals and they may that use forms of euthanasia other than chemical euthansia like shooting


In my home town a small city of 30,0000 about 5 years ago someone who was hired on by the animal control shelter, shjocked by what they seen they went to the newspaper and revealed that they were shooting the animals to euthanize. The next day an official for the city went on the news to state that according to the cities bylaws that shooting was considered an acceptable humane manner in which to euthanize and was legal according to provincial laws to euthanize animals in this manner

It had been going on for years and no one was even aware this had been happening, the citizens of my town were shocked and outraged and starting protesting, it took was several months and a high number of residents joining together by refusing to pay their city taxes that forced the city to finally bow to the pressure of the community and hired another A/C service with an agreement that the pets would be euthanized only by chemical injection.

It's not an isolated to just one city and not just happening in Ontario, and the bullet to the head can be faster and less traumatic and less painful than some of the other methods used.

Many Ontario animal controls and pounds destroy dogs after only 5 days and also sell them for animal research*. It is also still legal in Ontario to gas, shoot and electrocute dogs as "euthanasia". (* The Toronto Humane Society, SPCAs and Toronto Animal Services, among others, do not.)

http://www.gsrt.net/about.htm

Ouebec
Various methods are used to destroy unwanted pets. Decompression chambers and carbon-monoxide poisoning are common. Some pounds, like the one in D******ville, hose down the animals with water and then electrocute them. In M****el they just shoot them with a rifle. At a pound in Saint-Hy****he (now closed), staff used to knock their victims over the head with a sledge hammer and drop them half dead into a lime pit - and this went on for years within shouting distance of the province's veterinary college. A few pets find a more humane death by injection of a lethal dose of a quick-acting barbiturate http://www.katinkahesselink.net/other/danten1.html

BC
http://www.animaladvocates.com/spca-trigger-happy.htm

a list of methods used to euthanize
http://www.akitarescue.com/letsbe_honest.htm

mom_to_many
March 24th, 2006, 12:44 PM
We have ALOT of pig farmers around here...and their way of killing the little ones is to swing them by the back feet and bash their heads onto concrete. I actually worked for Smithfield Farms for a short time in the piglet nursery. Needless to say it was a short-lived job...the stress....no, I never killed a pig...and would have to leave when the co-workers did...I didn't want to see it, and the sound...well...yep...I quit!!

Rick C
March 24th, 2006, 01:29 PM
I asked my farm neighbour one time what had happened to a sick cow he had in the barnyard . . . . . he held up his arms and sighted down a mock rifle and pretended to pull a trigger.

They have four dogs down there and I think they're generally well looked after, including the Golden Retriever of which they're especially protective. They are not kennelled.

I think the treatment has improved, however, including time inside the house, only in the last few years when a new matron moved in and started cleaning the place up. The farmer is a recovering alcoholic.

My uncle up north has two Border Collies whom he generally refers to as "it" - although they do have names. They are kennelled for much of the day and have only one use, helping him herd his cattle. They are well cared for otherwise and have adequate shelter. When they are no longer of use to him I have no doubt he will put them down by shooting them. He's in his 80's and that's the environment he came from. He's doing what his father taught him to do.

Rick C
www.goldentales.ca

Akeeter
March 24th, 2006, 02:21 PM
Some take good care of 'working animals'. (Ie anything from cat's that handle vermin in the barn, to actual working sheep/cattle dogs)

And some do not. :sad:

Some farmers supplement those barn mouser cats (good!) with milk & good food because a good mouser does it for 'the love of the game', not because he/she is hungry!

Some idiots think a starving cat will try harder. (wrong!):(

Some farmers spay & neuter, & provide Vet care..:o

Other do not. Ditto shots & vaccinations.:sad:

I think all animals should have a home/house to live in, but a warm barn, & a reliable supply of food & water, + health care is a lot better than wandering with none of the above.

Semi-feril cats do not want to live in a home with people, but they can provide a service (mousing) for food, water, shelter & warmth. Most of these cats are dumped by city people or vacationers going home to No Pet environments in the Fall. My friends in Muskoka have fed, caught, & turned in to the SPCA over 20 abandoned cats & kittens:eek: in the past 2 years that have been dumped on their property.

erykah1310
April 18th, 2006, 11:29 PM
I asked my farm neighbour one time what had happened to a sick cow he had in the barnyard . . . . . he held up his arms and sighted down a mock rifle and pretended to pull a trigger.

You know the saying "cant teach an old dog new tricks" (which is a whole other subject but in context to this thread im talking about)
And as Ontario Greys has said, really we shouldnt judge the farmers. IMO (strongly IMO!!) When it comes to sick or injured livestock (large or small) I feel that whether a bullet or a vet ends the suffering isnt the main focus, not to let the animals suffer?
While "shooting" animals seems cruel, IMO as long as its swift and used as a last resort (after treatments have proven uneffective) we cant really judge any farmer who uses this method.
Once again incase someone misreads this I DO NOT suggest that shooting your animals is OK. I just feel that each of us has our own values and beliefs, and feel that we shouldnt judge when the best interest of the animal is in play.

Writing4Fun
April 19th, 2006, 09:49 AM
Roosters as pets in the city??? You will definitely HAVE to explain that one to me - I don't get it? :confused:
Sorry, just saw this question today. But it's pretty funny. Growing up, it was quite common for my parents and the other Italians in the neighbourhood to buy a chick or two, raise it for a while and then eat it. Some even tried it with lambs, goats, pigs, etc... Well, one of my neighbours had bought a chick, which grew into a rooster. But their son, who was in his late teens at the time, took a liking to the rooster. He raised it as a pet. It would wander around their front yard, crowing at all hours of the day, fiercely protecting their property. The son used to take it for rides in his t-top Camaro (couldn't he find a more stereotypical car?). We used to joke that they were out cruising for chicks together. :D

LM1313
April 19th, 2006, 07:42 PM
When my mom was a kid she lived in the city (St. Paul) but some idiot got "Easter chicks" and of course didn't want them when they started to grow, so my grandma took them in and they raised them in the backyard! They built a little chicken coop. There was one rooster in the batch and I'm sorry to say that he was killed and eaten after one of the neighbors complained about his crowing, although my grandma and grandpa didn't tell the kids this. :(

The really stupid thing is that a few weeks later the neighbors complained about the rooster crowing again! Maybe it was haunting them. ;)

~LM~