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How to get my beagle puppy to stop barking all day?

Pamz1e
February 22nd, 2006, 05:16 PM
I have a 7 month beagle named Picasso that likes to bark atleast 2 hours a day while i am at work. i live in an apartment building and this is getting problematic for my nieghbour. Picasso has to stay in the kitchen with a guard because im an artist and my work is all over and he can get hurt if i let him chew on everything. I also have a cat (which might be one of the reasons he's barking - he can see him through the guard) and Picasso would terrorize my kitty if i let him out. I've been leaving the radio on, giving him kongs, leaving the apartment super quietly, but to no avail.
My nieghbours are in the process of filling out a legal complaint and i dont want to loose my pretty puppy, but that seems the only way out of this. I cant move, i dont have enough money. Is there anything i can do that will work right away???? i only have a few weeks, and not alot of free time.

heeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeelp Picasso!!

Lucky Rescue
February 22nd, 2006, 05:28 PM
You did do research before getting this puppy and found out that hounds do tend to bark and howl a lot, right? It's not really fair to get a dog then get rid of it for doing what it was bred to do.

Either doggy daycare or hiring a dogwalker to come in during the day might help. I know this is expensive and not what you planned, but those are the kinds of committments we make when we bring a pet home.

Lissa
February 22nd, 2006, 06:06 PM
Unfortunately, there are no quick fixes to this kind of behaviour. Lucky's given you a couple of good options!

Is Picasso getting enough exercise? Is he crate-trained? How long is he being left? How much training has he had? How much time do you spend with him during the day?

I own a hound as well so I know how vocal they can be. ;)

CyberKitten
February 22nd, 2006, 06:44 PM
I fully agree with Lucky; As someone who once shared my life with a beagle who like the vast majority of his cohort was athletic and loved exercise and roaming outdoors, lovesd to be with me and hated to be alone - especially in another room by himself when I was home, was good natured and friendly, curious and loved to sniff EVERYTHING in sight even to the deterement of his own needs and mine and "could" be quite funny when he bayed and howled at who or what he iwas chasing, playing or annoyed with or just wanted attention.

Mine lived to a ripe old age and alas,is now at the Bridge waiting for me and I do miss him. But you cannot leave a beagle alone in a room if you yourself are in the home and ignoring him. You CAN however, train him to play with his toys, find things to do while you are working (mine played with my bunny - an alpha bunny who was there first and among the 4 pawed critters in our home ,the alpha animal in the house who actually chased the beagle and put him in his place. Of course, it helped immensely that when my beagle arrrived, he was smaller that the aforemenentioned rabbit so looked "up" to the leader of the gang and quickly learned his place. It was an unusual situation to be sure. In other ways, he was pure beagle - stubborn, took his good old time to learn or finally agree to my terms of onedience and the trainer whose classes we attended, lol and to become housebroken. But once all that was accomplished - and he became proficient in those abilities primarily done over the summer when I had more time and could even take time off from work to spend more time to bond with my new baby- Oh sure, he still needed to be on a leash when walking because of that time honoured tradition of beagle wanderlust and he would occaionally howl (but not often -more would have been more fun but he was a cotent little fellow so we had to make so with not all that much howling , lol) .

So I guess I do not understand how your little beagle can terrorize your cat - did you introduce them properly? (ex http://www.leerburg.com/dog-cat.htm) and why you would need a guard if he is properly trained. I actually took my dog to work on occasion and he did quite well there tho he preferred being home with his friends - he did however, enjoy baseball games, picnics, my brother's wedding pratice - where he marched up with the bride and stole the show, lol (The Priest commented later "I just love the dog!") but not the wedding for obvious reasons.

Nothing relly works quickly with beagles - they are extremely intelligent beings but you have to go slowly with them (which is a way of saying they can hardly be termed that old non politically correct term of "slow learners" but that they learn and acquire knowledge on their own terms. Beagles CAN live in apts but you usually need understanding neighbours- I needed understanding neigbours even in a house, especially since he arrived in the summer when the windows were screened in but open.

Have you tried obedience school? That worked very well for us an while it ook time -as all god things do - it was extremely helpful, even a Godsend. I am nm not sure I could manage to teach a beagle all on my own.

So if you have not done that, that seems like a wonderful starting point. If your neighbour is still upset, s/he is prob the kind the might like babies crying and children playing loudly either and it depends on your landlord- tenant legislation on how you work that out. I think beagles prob can do OK in apts or condos but it will take time, patience, patience, patience and more time. Talk to your neighbour and landlord and explain to him that your little one is in training and hopefully that will work! But a fast way - I honestly cannot think of any unless you try innovative solutions like maybe allowing him to be in the same room as you are once he is triained thru positive reinforcement NOT to chew your paintings and equipment. But as you know, any apt or house must be puppy proofed and usually that means every room. How about crate training an having him nap and chew on his kong on that room whlle you are working? Would that not work?

to be honest, - and pls do not take this the wrong way , I cannot imagine having a beagle and leaving him alone in a room while I am in another one working or doing anything. It seems unfair to the animal - dogs want to be with you, and even if he can see you from his crate or "den", I am certain he will do much better. (But never leave him in a crate for a long period of time!!!!) I have never
used one but there are many on thBoard who have had very good results with them and my brother succesfully used one in training his chocolate lab tho it is not needed any longer.

Good luck!

Prin
February 23rd, 2006, 12:46 AM
If you don't have a lot of free time, you probably don't have the time to exercise a hound puppy or to get into resolving this situation. Puppies require a lot of time and effort and anybody who doesn't want to put in either will not have a happy puppy.

I know that's not helpful, but for first impressions, you're not on a roll...
Picasso has to stay in the kitchen with a guard because im an artist and my work is all over This tells us you got a puppy, even though there isn't room for it in your life and you aren't willing to make room.

and he can get hurt if i let him chew on everything. Let him chew? Why would you LET him chew? Why wouldn't you watch him when you are home, and puppy proof when you aren't? Why let?

My nieghbours are in the process of filling out a legal complaint and i dont want to loose my pretty puppy, but that seems the only way out of this. I cant move, i dont have enough money. Is there anything i can do that will work right away???? i only have a few weeks, and not alot of free timeThis to me means "I need a quick fix because I picked my puppy based on looks and I don't have time to raise him or deal with him."
See? Not a good first impression on a board of animal lovers and people who do anything for their pets.;)