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2 things: Did anyone read Pets.ca homepg.? & a local pb article

lezzpezz
February 8th, 2006, 09:42 AM
Just wondering if anyone here actually read the article on Pit Bulls that was posted as the front page info story on the Pets.ca homepage yesterday. This is the story found when you log in and before you click on "bulletin board". It was entitled, "Pit bull Information", By the Positive Pitbull Awareness Society, and can likely be found at itsapitty.com, as the posting has since changed.

I found it 'enlightening'. Just wondering what others felt, especially those that own pb's.

Also, there is an article in todays Londoner paper, www.thelondoner.ca, by Yvette Van Veen, a regular contributor to the Londoner and a pet behaviour consultant and dog trainer. The website is currently posting last week's issue, but by days end, the current issue should be posted. Article is entitled, "Part one: you, your dog and the government".

It is an informative article and I wanted to highlight a few nuggets.

Firstly, the author states that downtown London is "gaining a reputation as an area where muscle dogs wander at large. If the animals are seized, manhy of these owners do not care the animal will be put down. There are more readily available. No tags -- no problem. It makes it just more difficult to ID the owner."

She continues, "There are several cases currently before the courts where a pit bull-type dog has been attacked by an off-leash aggressive dog. The pit bull is ordered put down, and the aggressive off-leash animal owned by an irresponsible owner is still out there. Feel any safer yet?"

I was unaware that there were a number of such cases pending, but figured their would be in time. The time is now.

Any thoughts?:o

StaceyB
February 8th, 2006, 09:50 AM
Are you saying that muzzled, on-leash PB's are being attacked by loose dogs and the PB is the one that is getting PTS.

lezzpezz
February 8th, 2006, 09:58 AM
I'm just quoting what the author said ver batim. I have no idea if the pb-type dogs are muzzled or not. I would assume that responsible folks are complying by the "law", however, I wonder who determined that their dog(s) are pit bulls?

This is why I posted. I want to know if anyone knows about the several pending cases.

Conners
February 8th, 2006, 04:37 PM
There are parts that the general public would have a hay day with and that is the aggression part. To me it sounds like all bullie owners have to be on constant watch for animal agression, which makes them different from other breeds.
We are trying to represent the Pit bull's (if properly raised, trained and loved) the same as any other loving, loyal dog. To forwarm that this agression could come out at ANY time, doesn't demonstrate that to me.
Yes, we DO have to watch our dogs at all times, but true of all the other dogs too. I don't worry that Shasta will attack and kill my cat when I've left for a little while. I don't take extra precautions, yet in the article is sounds like I should be.
It's little tidbits like this that got our dogs banned and muzzled in the first place. I'm personally shocked and disappointed in pets.ca that they would allow this without reading the full content before adding it to their front page.
While we fight to defend our dogs, an article like this underminds everything we have been trying to accomplish.

Conners
February 8th, 2006, 05:12 PM
Regarding the article in the Londoner, I thought it had value to spread to other areas to read rather than only keeping it for Londoners only, so I posted it in my blog today.
This was my article;
Wednesday, February 08, 2006
Irresponsible owners risking public

It's just as we have been saying right from the start about Pit bull attacks and other attacks that don't make the media. Since after all the Pit bull owners in Ontario had to register our dogs with strict regulations, and one being microchipped, they are finding that these lone, unsupervised dogs are not microchipped. Therefore, they are not registered as required by law.
As much as we voiced ourselves to Michael Bryant and the Liberal government, we fell on deaf ears. We were insistant that the problems weren't with the specific breed, nor was it with the responsible owners of the specific breed. As citizens of Ontario, our voices should have been as much considered as any other Ontarian. It shows government decides itself who's voices have value or not. They would not listen to the experts in the field that asked to be heard. They were refused.
The ban was decided and voted in by the Liberal government and only the Liberal Government. That sounds more like dictatorship to me.
While we are well in to this ban and the responsible owners of the bullie dogs are abiding by the law, unregistered dogs are being found the culprits and put down with no owners in sight. Why would they be? If they don't care enough about their dog to reponsibly register, train and contain them, they don't care what happens to their dog. They will move on to another dog and avoid getting caught to pay the fine and/or jail sentence by not coming forward. This proves that what we have been saying is true, yet does the government or the media acknowledge this? NO! Even so, when in the media it does say the dog was not microchipped, we know (and hopefully the general public) that dog was not owned by a responsible owner, but by whom even we want not allowed dog ownership to and want them dealt with harshly and accordingly.
There is an article in The Londoner by Yvette Van Veen (http://www.thelondoner.ca/city/petcol.htm), a Pet Behaviourist and what she has to say on the subject.
http://www.thelondoner.ca/city/cols/yvanveen.jpg
A two part series on you, your dog and the government
So much has changed over the past six months in terms of dog ownership. The recent changes have prompted dozens of questions. To answer some of the questions readers have, we will take a look at the impact of three months of the Dog Owner’s Liability Act. Next week we will take a look at animal related matters specific to London.
Officially, the Dog Owner’s Liability Act kicked off on Halloween. This means that on Oct. 31, we took our son out trick or treating as most people did. Sadly, during the evening, a dog lunged at my son’s face through a screen door. Welcome to DOLA.
If you base your opinion on what you read in the headlines, you may feel safer. In reality, you are quite possibly in more danger now than ever.
Dundas Street Dangers: Dundas is gaining a reputation as an area where muscle dogs wander at large. If the animals are seized, many of these owners do not care the animal will be put down. There are more readily available. No tags – no problem. It makes it just more difficult to ID the owner.
Exotic Muscle Breeds: Two years ago, it would be nearly impossible to find anyone who knew or wanted an exotic muscle dog. Usually weighing in at an excess of 100 lbs., these dogs make Staffies look like toy poodles. Some people want an aggressive dog. Those people have filled shelters with their ‘banned’ breed and have up-graded to larger dogs.
Court Challenges: In Kitchener, a recent court challenge has found in favour of the dog. There was no bite in the case, and no aggressive behavior. An officer identified the dog as a pit bull, and the owner contended the dog was not. Industry professionals have maintained from the outset that breed identification was ambiguous at best.
Millions of Your Dollars: London has estimated we should require $100,000 annually to address the situation. Hamilton places their estimate at $250,000. Provincially the totals run into the millions of dollars. And that is an estimate. Add the court costs that will no doubt arise and you get the picture. Lawyers cost money.
People at Risk: There are several cases currently before the courts where a pit bull-type dog has been attacked by an off-leash aggressive dog. The pit bull is ordered put down, and the aggressive off-leash animal owned by an irresponsible owner is still out there. Feel any safer yet?
What do responsible owners need to do? Follow the law. If you have any doubt how the law affects you, seek legal advice. There are specialists in dog law. If you need breed identification done, do not do so yourself. Find a veterinarian who will make a designation for you.
As for the average person who feels safer, think again. There is a reason large scale banning in England resulted in a 25 per cent increase in dog bites requiring hospitalization. Banning didn’t work during prohibition, and the gun registry does not inspire criminals to register their weapons. Why would DOLA be any different?

hdme
February 13th, 2006, 02:23 PM
Friends of ours recently had their pit cross put down in a very similar situation to that in the article...she got out of the yard in their picture-perfect little suburb neighborhood and was attacked by a neighbors' dog. She fought back and she was put down.

This is a dog who lived with two small children, a small mixed breed dog and a Shih Tzu. She was the most friendly, loving lapdog. The first time I met her, I sat on the floor and she came over, layed down and put her chin my lap. We know that she was put down for the simple reason that she had pit in her...the other dog who attacked first was injured, but did not get put down. It's so sad.

I firmly believe that given the right (or wrong actually) upbringing, any dog can be vicious no matter what their breed. We have to remember that dogs may be 'domesicated', but they are still animals with animal instincts....just my two cents....

Conners
February 13th, 2006, 02:45 PM
Friends of ours recently had their pit cross put down in a very similar situation to that in the article...she got out of the yard in their picture-perfect little suburb neighborhood and was attacked by a neighbors' dog. She fought back and she was put down.

This is a dog who lived with two small children, a small mixed breed dog and a Shih Tzu. She was the most friendly, loving lapdog. The first time I met her, I sat on the floor and she came over, layed down and put her chin my lap. We know that she was put down for the simple reason that she had pit in her...the other dog who attacked first was injured, but did not get put down. It's so sad.

I firmly believe that given the right (or wrong actually) upbringing, any dog can be vicious no matter what their breed. We have to remember that dogs may be 'domesicated', but they are still animals with animal instincts....just my two cents....
I think this is another change in the amendments that need to be addressed. It's the irresponsible dog owners they should be after and there are situations when accidents happen even to responsible owners.
In cases such as this, I think they (AC) should speak to neighbours, friends and relatives about the nature of the dog and look for previous incidents. There are exceptions to the rule in everything, unless you happen to be a pit bull, and that is just PLAIN WRONG!
I've been told there is no room for error in our dogs and the way this law is worded, that literally correct...but they are dogs afterall...not Super Dogs and accidents do happen.