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Does any have a five year old ?

Joey.E.CockersMommy
February 7th, 2006, 07:00 PM
My kids went today for their anual checkup at the doctors.
Apparently at age 5 is when most kids weigh how may inches they are

My son is 43 inches and 43 pounds thought that was kind of interesting.:)

happycats
February 7th, 2006, 07:05 PM
That is interesting! My son will be 5 in a week, I'll have to check that:)

happycats
February 7th, 2006, 07:09 PM
Nope it didn't work mine is 45 and 50.(He is built like a football player) but maybe it's when he's more mid 5?
Also, children qualify for the free chicken pox vaccine when they turn 5:)

cpietra16
February 7th, 2006, 07:22 PM
My girl is 45 inches and weighs 48

Joey.E.CockersMommy
February 7th, 2006, 08:03 PM
Cpietra= My girl is 45 inches and weighs 48 My son likes taller woman. :D

My son turned five in October. He is just at the 50th percentile. I am 5. 8 and dad is 5.10 so I dont think either of our kids will end up being especially big.

Funny thing they have both stayed at the same percentile mark since they were born, my oldest has always been in the 25th percentile and youngest in the 50th percentile. We are alwasy worried that they are not eating enough but apparently they are growing on schedule. :D

happycats=

Also, children qualify for the free chicken pox vaccine when they turn 5

:D No free vaccine for us, both my kids managed to get it about three years ago within a week of each other. They came through it okay though.

happycats
February 7th, 2006, 08:08 PM
I heard that how tall your child is at 2, you double that and that's how tall they will be when they are an adult.

I'm only 5'1 and Dad 5'10. But my son has always been big for his age and was 3' at the age of 2, so if that's correct he should be 6' :cool:

cpietra16
February 7th, 2006, 08:15 PM
[QUOTE=Joey.E.CockersMommy]Cpietra= My son likes taller woman. :D

Taller and she's italian with a temper to match:eek:

As far as I know she has always been over the 95 percentile from get go...she came into this world at 11lbs.
My son who7 was 8lbs and was also over the 90 percentile with everything, but this last year has gone down to 50th percentile.
My 3 year old is going to be as big as her sister...still over the 90 th percentile

MOM....well I'm just over the 95th percemtile exhausted:)

CyberKitten
February 7th, 2006, 10:27 PM
Re: heard that how tall your child is at 2, you double that and that's how tall they will be when they are an adult.

I don't want to burst your bubble but this has no scientific basis. Maybe it works if all things are equal and no other intervening variables affect your child's growth but I would be very cautious about suggesting that as a method. I hesitate to use my own example but if my parents relied on that, they would have been very far out. Scoliosis affects height as do many other genetic and medical problems.

The only way to ascertain potential growth - and even that can change over the years - is a detailed medical history, including information about the pregnancy and birth, growth during infancy, illnesses, appetite, diet, medications and home environment and genetic info.

A child's height is influenced by the heights of the parents. Overall, children from small families tend to be shorter than average as adults. Because heredity (genetic potential) plays a significant role in determining height, the medical history will include information about family members. The heights of the child's parents and the growth patterns of siblings are valuable pieces of information.

It may be helpful to get information from the child's grandparents about anything unusual in the parents' growth patterns, especially the ages at which the parents went through puberty.

Your child's pediatrician shuld perform other evaluations, since other factors — such as treatable medical conditions — also influence growth. (ie scoliosis or other skeletal abnormalities, precocious puberty, systemic disesaes of various kinds - hundreds of different variables here, nutritional probs, anemia, cancer, among others.

The primary symptom that may indicate a growth problem is when a child grows less than two inches a year after his/her second birthday.

Your ped MUST do a detailed growth evaluation, measuring your child's weight and height - and these are plotted on the appropriate growth charts for comparison with normal ranges. It is also helpful if you are able to provide the doctor with any other measurements taken during your child's life — for example, your child's "baby book" or the measurements from the back of the bedroom door!

Additional measurements of your child's head circumference, arm and leg lengths or other body parts, may also be obtained. A careful examination will be performed to check for any signs of congenital conditions (conditions present at birth), chronic illness or hormone deficiencies.

The growth chart is an important tool used to determine if a child has a growth problem. By plotting a child's measurements on a growth chart over time, a doctor can determine if a child is growing normally or not. If a child's height falls downward across the percentile lines, he or she fails to grow over a period of time, is much shorter than other children of the same age or is much shorter than would be expected based on the parents' heights, tests may be required to determine the cause.

There is also Bone-age evaluation and your ped or family doc may obtain an x-ray of your child's left hand and wrist — called a bone age x-ray — to evaluate the maturity of his or her bones.

The x-ray is compared with a series of standard x-rays of children at different ages to determine your child's bone maturity. Using this x-ray, a child's growth potential can also be determined — that is, how much remaining growth he or she has left. As with all growth measurements, there is a wide range of normal development. Having a bone age that is somewhat younger or older than a child's chronological age (or "calendar age" — the actual age since birth) is not unusual. However, if the bone age is extremely advanced or delayed, this may suggest an underlying growth problem. The bone-age evaluation is generally used along with the physical examination and growth charts to obtain a comprehensive picture of a child's growth and maturity.

Of course if there seem to be anything unusual, tests should be done. Blood samples may be taken to look for evidence of any medical problems that can cause short stature or slow growth. These tests help your child's doctor determine if chronic illness, poor nutrition, bowel disorders or hormone deficiencies are affecting growth. To help confirm a diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency, more extensive testing — such as a growth hormone stimulation test — may be required. Such testing generally involves administration of one or two medications and collection of blood samples at several different times over a number of hours.

A special type of "brain scan" called a magnetic resonance imaging scan, or MRI scan, may be needed in some cases to look for any changes or disturbances in the area of the hypothalamus and pituitary gland.

I hope this helps but please don't rely on what you have heard. There are far too many factors involved in the development and growth of a child for it to be that easy - and not that it is even complicated by far. None of us can oredict the future - tho our own family genetics and medical history can certainly help.

Pediatricains use tthe values of: 40-47 inches, mean: 110 cm (44 in) for 5 year old boys so your 5 yr old is not at all atypical. Annual growth for males is usually (until Puberty) is 2-3 inches/year (5-7.5 cm) .

I hope this helps. There are many good resources online and even your pediatrician should have pamplets and info you can read.

Joey.E.CockersMommy
February 7th, 2006, 11:20 PM
Cyberkitten= Pediatricains use tthe values of: 40-47 inches, mean: 110 cm (44 in) for 5 year old boys so your 5 yr old is not at all atypical. Annual growth for males is usually (until Puberty) is 2-3 inches/year (5-7.5 cm) .

they said hes just below the 50th percentile in height, but hes by far not the shortest in his class hes somewhere in the middle. He is also born at the end of October which makes most of the kids in his class older then him. He was only 7'13 at birth, within the first three months he was within the 90th percentile as he was hungry all the time, so I obliged him and fed him on demand whenever he wanted. He stayed that way until he started walking at 10 months and eating solid food- but pretty much since then hes been about in the middle of those percentile charts.

Cpietra=
As far as I know she has always been over the 95 percentile from get go...she came into this world at 11lbs.

:D 11 pounds I could not imagine. Its hard enough when they are 7 -8 pounds. :eek: Come to think of it, it seems the girls in the class are taller then the boys.

Prin
February 8th, 2006, 12:04 AM
I don't know about all those stats for height and weight and all that... I mean, to see if he's normal, ok, but not to make any predictions... I was among the tallest in kindergarten and every year after that, I was the shortest. Even now, among my generation, I'm fairly short. I think it all works for the best though because my man isn't tall at all, but he's still a teeny bit taller than me.;)