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Fostering?

Okami
February 5th, 2006, 04:18 AM
Hello, I have intentions of fostering in the future (when I have my own place). I'm curious what fostering is like. What are some guildlines to follow.
Can you foster both cats and dogs? How does adoption through a foster work? Do you adopt pets at the local shelter to foster?
Most importantly would fostering be a good choice for a person who will work 8-5 weekdays.

coppperbelle
February 5th, 2006, 08:39 AM
The first thing you should do is get in touch with a shelter or rescue group and ask them about their policies and how they work.
In my rescue we are in contact with each other via e-mail. People contact us about dogs that need to be rescued. We do not buy dogs or pay for them to get them out of a shelter. An available volunteer (we need more) pick up a dog and assess it. We also make sure it is spayed or neutered and up to date on vaccinations. The cost of vet care is covered by the rescue. Once it is ready to be adopted we place the dogs picture and description on our web site. People contact the foster personally for information about adopting the dog.

I don't know where you are located but we are in desperate need of foster homes. We are a golden rescue group and only deal with goldens. Anyone interested in fostering goldens in the Montreal area should contact us. Over the last month or so we have lost a number of foster homes as they have moved away etc....

As for being at work from 8 - 5 I don't believe it is a problem as long as you don't foster young pups or dogs with special needs, i.e. a dog that may need a bathroom break during the day.

It is very rewarding experience and every dog I have fostered has left a little mark on my heart.

Frenchy
February 5th, 2006, 09:05 AM
Okami,fostering is very rewarding,as mention by coppperbelle,every rescue has their own policies.Usually,if they have a website,you can look it up.I too work from 8 to 5.If my dogs can take it,so does the fosters.I had 2 fosters that would had been eutheunaze if not pick up by me.I don't think these guys care if I get home at 5h30!Good luck.

Okami
February 5th, 2006, 06:10 PM
:) Thank you for the info guys! I'm thinking of fostering mainly cats, I live in Calgary Alberta, and there is a really big problem with stray cats here. Alot of people don't put identification tags on their cats, and because of that the shelters are overloaded with felines. I feel really bad for the little furries, stray dogs are easily noticed and taken in, but with cats it's hard to tell if they're stray or not (alot of people just let them wander).

Prin
February 5th, 2006, 07:01 PM
Fostering is a whole house disruption... You just have to be ready for it.:)

meb999
February 6th, 2006, 11:41 AM
the important thing is to find a rescue organisation that you feel comfortable with. Fostering can be very rewarding, but also a little heartbreaking (when they leave...:sad: ) Good for you for considering it! Keep us posted!!

Lucky Rescue
February 6th, 2006, 01:11 PM
Most importantly would fostering be a good choice for a person who will work 8-5 weekdays.

That's no problem if you're fostering cats, but you must be prepared to keep them until they are adopted. Average time could be 1 week to 6+ months and that's IF you are working with an organization that promotes the animals and actively tries to rehome them by adoption events, websites etc.

meb999
February 6th, 2006, 02:22 PM
That's no problem if you're fostering cats, but you must be prepared to keep them until they are adopted. .

Sorry if this is threadjacking -- but I have a question for you lucky (or anyone else) -- I've always wondered, is it easier to adopt out dogs than cats? What I mean is, is there more demand for dogs or cats? Just curious....

Prin
February 6th, 2006, 02:26 PM
A person I know got a cat from a pet store for $40. So to me, because they're so easy to get, there would be more and they'd be harder to place (why adopt one when you can have a baby for $40?). Poor kitties.

meb999
February 6th, 2006, 02:41 PM
A person I know got a cat from a pet store for $40. So to me, because they're so easy to get, there would be more and they'd be harder to place (why adopt one when you can have a baby for $40?). Poor kitties.

That's what I was thinking...plus the shelters often get whole litters of kittens...

Lucky Rescue
February 6th, 2006, 03:22 PM
I've always wondered, is it easier to adopt out dogs than cats?

It depends. It's definitely easier to adopt out a Siamese cat than it is to adopt out a medium sized, adult black Lab mix.

But it's much easier to adopt out highly desirable dogs breeds, like Yorkshire terriers or toy poodles than it is to adopt out any cat or kitten even if the cat is purebred.

If the cat is a kitten and purebred (very rare) it goes immediately.

amber416
February 6th, 2006, 05:05 PM
It seems like it's much easier to adopt out dogs around here than it is cats. Dogs, no matter how common the breed or how old they are, seem to fly out of our local shelter, while they euthanize tons of cats. Every single time I go to the shelter to visit, over half of the dog cages are empty, and most other dogs have "adoption pending" signs on their cage.

I work as the adoption coordinator for our rescue group, a group that focuses mainly on feral/ semi-feral cats (lots of TNR, adopting out tamed ferals is just a part of what we do). We hold adoption events weekly at a pet store, and we still have cats that have been in foster care for a long time...over a year in some cases. It's just not that easy to adopt out a 5 year old, solid black cats when you can find a tiny kitten for the same price as our adoption fee at a pet shop ten minutes away.

Our kittens do tend to go really quickly though, so when we get a new foster parent we like to start them off "easy". Usually with a few really adorable young kittens (calicos and orange kittens seem to be the best bet). It seems to work out better in the long run when foster parents get their feet wet with quick adoptions first and then graduate to some of the older cats or ones that need more socialization.

This past weekend, actually, i had a new foster parent drop their two foster cats (about 6 months old) off for our adoption event. They never returned for them at the end of the fair, and after waiting for them for an hour and placing many unreturned calls, they ended up going home with me. I think this person just expected that the cats were going to be adopted immediately and that fostering was a really short, easy commitment, despite what she had been told during her time applying to be a foster parent. Unfortunately it's not. Fostering is expensive and time consuming, not to mention emotionally draining. I have only been fostering since last March and i have had so many cats come through my house.

I had a kitten who I had been fostering since she was 3 days old last summer. We had her spayed when she was big enough, but she ended up having a bad reaction to the surgery and she almost died. I spent many nights awake with her and in the end, she pulled through. A month later I had to bring her to her new home and leave her there. I wanted to keep her so badly, but i knew if i kept a kitten from every litter I would soon become a hoarder, not too mention out of room to take in new fosters. I knew she was young and cute and easily adoptable and that I had to save room at my place for the black cats, the semi-ferals that hate to be picked up and hide under beds....the "unadoptable", basically.

Anyway, it IS very rewarding and it's defnitely worth the money, the stress, the mess, and the emotional investment. I always shudder to think where some of these cats would have ended up if they had not been found by rescue, fostered, and adopted into screened, wonderful homes.

Okami
February 6th, 2006, 09:54 PM
It wont be a problem keeping the cats for a long period of time. The biggest problem is I get attached easily and most of them will probably stay as permanent pets haha.

Lucky Rescue
February 6th, 2006, 10:12 PM
most of them will probably stay as permanent pets

So what's the problem?:p

Actually, out of the 30 or 40 cats/kittens I've fostered I only kept three of them, and they were and are pretty unadoptable.

Okami
February 7th, 2006, 10:49 AM
Haha I'm afraid if I keep keeping the cats there wont be anymore room to foster anymore.

jiorji
February 9th, 2006, 01:59 AM
A person I know got a cat from a pet store for $40. So to me, because they're so easy to get, there would be more and they'd be harder to place (why adopt one when you can have a baby for $40?). Poor kitties.

yeah I saw that too at the pet store across from me. They also had a German Shepherd pup for $250 once.

Prin
February 9th, 2006, 10:03 AM
Yeah $250 for a new shep or $175 for an adult shep at the SPCA?

Lucky Rescue
February 9th, 2006, 10:33 AM
A person I know got a cat from a pet store for $40

Yeah, but what these people seem to have a hard time understanding is that by the time you take the kitten to the vet that the exam, deworming, and spay/neuter will put them over the 150$ mark usually, so the cat is actually closer to 200$ than 40$. Unless of course they aren't planning on doing any of these things, and of course the pet store owner couldn't care less.

They could get a rescued kitten, spayed/neutered, checked, vaccinated all for 120$

Daisy_Mae
February 9th, 2006, 04:19 PM
Can you foster both cats and dogs?

You can but it's difficult as in my case where we don't normally have a background on the dog. It's stressful for the cats since most dogs aren't cat killers but if they haven't been around them before they will be curious, which can lead to barking, chasing, pouncing etc. My cats are getting used to it, they just stay away until they feel comfortable coming around the dog. We also don't allow the dogs upstairs or downstairs so the cats have their own place.

Most importantly would fostering be a good choice for a person who will work 8-5 weekdays.

Again, it really depends on what type of fostering you are doing. Cats will be fine, you will probably have to segregate them while you are away since fights can happen while you are gone. With dog rescue, if you find somewhere that will let you foster a dog that they know a bit about, and it's a healthy dog then you should be fine. In my case I do pound rescue, so there is no background on most of them and they aren't usually healthy so I have come home to several messes.

Also, keep in mind, the smaller rescue groups like the one I am in don't have the funds to supply food so I pay for dog food. The odd time we get donations so those are split between the foster homes. Toys, blankets, treats, I pay for them all out of my pocket. They pay for the vet bills. Sometimes our foster homes have to pay the vet bill and then take it out of the adoption fee. It's not ideal for most people.

Personally I find some foster homes have too many cats that they don't have the time to spend with them. I adopted our male black cat from a foster home that had him since he was a kitten and still had him 5 years later. She had 18 cats total and they were all segregated based on conflicts. I adopted this cat because he was in a small room with one other cat and was completely scared of people. He would have been there for life in that little room had I not take him. He was a feral kitten who was scared and spent his first year at another foster home under the couch. He missed that crucial socialization period. I have had him for a year and he is still skittish. You can really get in over your head fostering if you aren't careful.

I have 6 cats, all unwanted cats. I wouldn't dare think of bringing in more because they have a hard enough time co-existing right now. They live peacefully because each one had their own area of the house to get away too. If you really think before you consider adopting a foster and don't make any rash decisions you will make the right choice and keep the ones that you feel should stay and the ones that could be happy in another home.

Fostering is a whole house disruption... You just have to be ready for it.

Couldn't have said it better myself! More so with dogs I think but the challenge with cats is them getting along.

I agree with everyone else that cats are harder to place. The whole issue with fostering is people want to go to a store or shelter to look at several cats not drive to someone else's house to see one cat. I used to volunteer for an SPCA and the foster cats took forever to get adopted. They usually brought them back to the shelter unless they were too stressed to be there.

I had to save room at my place for the black cats, the semi-ferals that hate to be picked up and hide under beds

I hear ya, me too. My most recent adoption was 2 sister semi-feral cats that were at the shelter I volunteer for. They were there for 8 months and I knew they were never going to get adopted, they weren't showing any progress at all and most volunteers wouldn't go near them so I brought them home. I don't regret it for one second. They don't like to be pet but they sure seem greatful to have a home of their own and not be living in a cage!