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roaming dogs

Beetlecat
January 11th, 2006, 01:16 PM
How do you all handle roaming dogs? Since I started walking Ky twice/day for 30min (or more) each time, I see a loose dog probably every few days.

They have all been friendly, so far, but that doesn't mean I want them following us home and wanting to play, more because Ky absolutly refuses to turn his back on them or continue the walk, so I'm stuck there until they finally leave.

I never want to yell at the dogs, since that would just turn Ky on, but, for the first time, he warned it himself. And it worked, it left.

I don't want him to become dog aggressive while on a leash, but that is what is going to happen if they keep bugging us. Actually, I'm less concerned with him attacking a dog with the intent to harm (even with humans, he has not so much as raised a bruise), than I am that it might provoke and aggressive response in a bigger dog.

How do you deal with 'friendly' roaming dogs. Or have you ever had an incident with aggressive ones? How did/should you deal with it?

Joey.E.CockersMommy
January 11th, 2006, 02:17 PM
I really dislike it when people let their dog roam, or when they come rushing out of an unfenced yard and start following you. It makes it hard when you are trying to work on aggression issues with your own dog, and another dog comes running out of a driveway off leash. Especially if you dont know if the dog is friendly and the dog is a big dog. I have gotten to the point where Joey is fine walking by a dog, but if he gets in close contact with a large male dog he will usually snarl or snap at the dog.

Personally I will yell at a strange dog to go away if he gets close. Not sure if this is what I should do or not, but it makes me nervous when a stange dog is approaching Joey.

SnowDancer
January 11th, 2006, 02:24 PM
I agree with the law. Dogs should be on leash when on city streets and if left alone in a fenced yard, he/she should not be able to escape. My dog is always on a leash - and frankly I am tired of having to cover my dog to protect him from attacks. Certainly he will bark and want to play, but that has not been the intention of the other dogs. Also, people who love their dogs should not want them to be creamed on the city streets. A dog getting loose from the house is another matter. I am talking about people who do it regularly and with dogs who are known to attack other animals. We have at least 4 in our neighbourhood.

Beetlecat
January 11th, 2006, 04:33 PM
Personally I will yell at a strange dog to go away if he gets close. Not sure if this is what I should do or not, but it makes me nervous when a stange dog is approaching Joey.

Actually, I am thinking this might be what I will have to do. I don't want this to be another issue where Ky figures he has to act first. I need him to believe that I will protect him. And holding onto the leash and frowning, just isn't gonna do it :D

twodogsandacat
January 11th, 2006, 05:36 PM
Now that we are in winter it has been less of a problem. We are occasionally followed from a distance by a sheepdog mix but he generally is not that interested in us.

I do however plan on reporting any dog that comes out to greet us. Especially the dominant Ė aggressive ones no matter the size. The reason for this is simple. I donít own a pit bull but some people confuse my mix with one (thank god for animal control and the SPCA around here knowing something about dogs and breeds). This similarity although un-substantial and the rescue work I have done and such has left me with a love for the breed.

Under the current DOLA any pit bull that is involved in an altercation no matter who starts it is at risk of violating the law. That is a muzzled and leashed pit can be attacked by a pint-sized dog and if he\she crushes it with his paw the owner and dog face action under the current law. Unfair? Damn right it is.

So because an off leash roaming dog can start something and the punishment for the victim is more severe than for the at fault dog I have no problem reporting the owners.

BernerLver
January 12th, 2006, 10:41 AM
more because Ky absolutly refuses to turn his back on them or continue the walk, so I'm stuck there until they finally leave.

Bailey does this too. Heaven help me if we encounter another dog (leashed or unleashed) on our morning or evening walk. Bailey will walk a few steps and then turn around the see if the dog is there, an "ok let's go" from me, a few more steps and he's turned around looking at the dog again. This goes on and on until the dog is out of his sight.

I was surprised at the number of roaming dogs in my neighborhood. Esp. since it's a new neighborhood and there is a lot of construction equipment around and construction debris that could easily hurt a dog.

How can people have dogs and not care about their safety and well being?

Beetlecat
January 12th, 2006, 01:22 PM
How can people have dogs and not care about their safety and well being?

It's not uncommon for a dog to simply rush across the road upon seeing us.

We've even had dogs (off leash of course and often without collars) run up to us leaving their owners down the block or across the street. (why they are off leash at all is a different matter) and as soon as the owner catches up, the dog takes off again. I can't imagine (in any universe) letting my dog disrespect me like that.

And wouldn't you feel horrible if your dog got hit by a car right in front of you because it ran across the street after another dog, not to mention the cost of the accident. Keep the darn thing on a leash if he/she cannot be absolutly trusted.

BMDLuver
January 12th, 2006, 01:57 PM
Sort of veering off topic here but if you yell at the approaching dog when you are trying to work on issues with your own dog, then I would think it is translating down the leash to be afraid of an approaching dog. Just my take on it.

Beetlecat
January 12th, 2006, 04:11 PM
Sort of veering off topic here but if you yell at the approaching dog when you are trying to work on issues with your own dog, then I would think it is translating down the leash to be afraid of an approaching dog. Just my take on it.

Which is why I had previously decided not to. But, my only other option is to just stand there until Ky finally decides to growl at the dog on his own. I think in our case, all this does is show him that I cannot be relied upon to protect him.

And, right now, my only goal with him is to show him that I will protect him and show him when he needs to be scared of or aggressive to something and when he doesn't.

I actually do not mind at all that he is aggressive, but he just needs an 'off' switch.

Luvmypit
January 12th, 2006, 04:26 PM
Ya I agree dogs should be leashed unles sin a desiginated leash area. I know there are dogs out there that can easily walk beside their owner and not roam or get distracte. Unforunantly we cant trust all owners to know when to leash and unleash their dog.

My dad when walking my parents y lab was followed all the way home from the park by a rottie. The dog was trying to engage my parents dog Cane into play. Cane couldnt be bothered. Needless to say he followed my dad all the way home and then sat out on our front stoop. My dad told him go home go home but he just sat there. He later found it was a rottie named King and that he often roams. He apparently was such a sweet heart

chico2
January 12th, 2006, 05:13 PM
I am kind of new to walking my neighbors Bailey(cocker)I've been doing it since the summer every day and I can honestly say,I am terrified of other dogs coming up to her.
Luckily we have no roaming dogs,but even someone walking past us worries me,Bailey seems to think she is a Rottweiler and growls at other dogs.
So I avoid any confrontations and cross the street..maybe I should let her socialize and sniff out the other dog,I don't know..I never see the owner to ask her,she comes home late from work...

Joey.E.CockersMommy
January 12th, 2006, 09:01 PM
BMD Lover

Sort of veering off topic here but if you yell at the approaching dog when you are trying to work on issues with your own dog, then I would think it is translating down the leash to be afraid of an approaching dog. Just my take on it.

so what should we do if a large dog is running up to us and there is no owner in sight and in my case I know my dog will be agressive if he is on a leash with another dog that is not on a leash especially if that dog is male.

mummummum
January 12th, 2006, 10:45 PM
We have so many dogs in my neighbourhood who's so-called "guardians" - no, make that "owners" think it's okay to let their dawgs off-lead on the street or simply open the door to let them out and off they go. I'm thinking of putting up posters entitled "WhyYour Unleashed Dog is Dead":

"I only took my eyes off her for a moment"..."Yes, but that was enough time for her to chase that squirrel into the road only to be hit by that car"
"He's perfectly well-behaved off-lead and always approaches dogs in a friendly manner"..."Yes, but my dog isn't friendly and it will be YOUR fault when YOUR dog is bitten"
"She is extremely well-trained and should have the freedom of being off-lead when we're out on our walks"..."Yes, but she wasn't well-trained enough to resist that chicken bone now stuck in her throat"
"He needs the exercise, he needs to run, he can't explore and play when he's on a leash"..."Yes, but he won't be playing at all after he laps up that anti-freeze".

Too harsh ? I know I've ranted about unleashed dawgs before and Animal Services is helpful but, these owners just don't seem to understand the risks they put their own dogs and mine up against.:mad:

Prin
January 12th, 2006, 11:21 PM
Uhh.. If it was me, I'd call the dog. Usually an angry "Come here!" will make the dog run away.;) Seriously.