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I need help with my 2mnth old PUP

Bucketz
January 4th, 2006, 11:05 AM
I have a Catahoula bulldog!! she's cries and sometimes barks when i put her in her crate, she seems to slowly learn to do her business outside, but she nibble and bites and when i try to stop her her grawls and bark!!

What to do!!! i dont know!!

Rottielover
January 4th, 2006, 11:19 AM
you have reg puppy behaviour. Search the threads, you will come up with some good answers. As well as after vaccines are good, enroll in OB course

Bucketz
January 4th, 2006, 11:20 AM
you have reg puppy behaviour. Search the threads, you will come up with some good answers. As well as after vaccines are good, enroll in OB course

Thanks but what do u do when they bite?

StaceyB
January 4th, 2006, 11:44 AM
Don't leave your hands there.
Yell ouch like it hurts and walk out of the room, closing the door. Wait 30 seconds and return. If your puppy has stopped then give them something they are allowed to chew, not you. If your pup continues then repeat.
The last thing you want to do is immediately give them something to chew. That is like saying, what a good puppy for chewing on me, here you go have a reward.
Never use physical force of any kind unless you want the behaviour to continue or get worse. Don't hold their mouth shut, stick your finger in their mouth or anything like this. If you do odds are that your puppy will fight back(or snap).
Puppies usually do this because their mouth hurts because of teething or they want to play. By leaving, your puppy will figure out that when they use their mouth on you it causes you to leave, not play and what they want is play.

tenderfoot
January 4th, 2006, 02:08 PM
Stacey's ideas are valid and work for many people. I will however add our 2-cents.
We believe that you need to teach and reward the behaviors you want to encourage or discourage. By this I mean that we do put our hands right in front of the pup and teach her to make a better choice. Pups engage each other in play by starting with their mouths so it is a very natural thing for your pup to do. You as the parent need to teach her not to bite or press down on your skin - bite inhibition. You can choose not to ever let her mouth touch you but in our minds that isn't fully necessary. Mouthing is part of relationship in a puppies world and typically won't continue past toddlerhood. We let our little guys sort of suck our thumbs for comfort when we are cuddling.
You need to teach 'bite-inhibition'. Normally her mother would have taught this to her - but people usually take the pups away before she gets the chance.
If you act like a litter mate then the puppy will treat you like a litter mate - if you act like a parent the puppy will treat you with respect like a parent. You teach them like the mother would NOT like the other puppies would.
You should not shake or Alpha role a puppy and do not punish her with the crate. But that doesn't mean you can't be clear about your boundaries of right and wrong behavior. Momma would correct the biting and then give her another chance to choose better. If after a few attempts to correct her don't deter her then she would correct him intensely one last time and then walk away.
We allow a puppy to put his mouth on our hands (because puppies relate to the world through their mouths) and teach him not to use pressure on us. We position our hand intentionally with a thumb in his mouth. If he presses down at all - we firmly say "quit" in a low tone and QUICKLY press down & release on the tongue with the thumb. Don't hold your finger down, just press and release. He will want to spit your thumb out of his mouth because it is no fun. Sometimes it takes 3-5 corrections before he knows you mean business. But then continue to play with him and keep correcting the bad choices and praising the good ones. It is fast and intense but not harmful. Continue to play with him in a gentle manner - he will learn that gentle playing is more fun and lasts longer.
We also apply what we call the 'wind shield wiper' technique. Sit on the floor and the pup will likely try to leap into your lap and try to engage you in play (often using her mouth). Try to sit in a cross legged manner and have your elbows on your knees (make sense?) - have your flat hands (facing you) in your lap. When she tries to come into your space - set a boundary by swiping your hands & forearm up and down like a windshield wiper. She will venture into the zone and might make contact with your fast moving hand/arm. You are not trying to hit your pup but you are setting a boundary of respect. It is her choice to come into it or not. Typically she will try it 1-2 times and then see it is no fun and back away. Often the pup will sit or lay down right in front of you and look into your eyes. At this point you praise her good choice and CALMLY and gently stroke her head. This shows her that calm, gentle behavior gets attention. If she gets nutsy again then you do the same drill. You are simply saying this is my space and you are not permitted to just jump in and take over. I will love on you when you are calm.
The other way is to use your flat hand towards her nose and if she pops into your space you use a 'snappy' pop towards her. Again, it is her choice whether or not to come into your hands. You are not striking out at her but setting a boundary. After afew challenges she should sit down and look at you - this is when you calmy praise.
See the disadvantage we have is that we don't use our mouths to communicate physically with the pups like other dogs do. So we have to use our most available tool which is our hands/arms at times. You are never going to be as harsh as another dog would but you have every right to stop a pushy pup and set a boundary. If this behavior occurred with a small defenseless child or an elderly person - the puppy could unwittingly hurt someone. So stop the behavior now and be done with it. Use a word to help guide the pup. Like 'off', 'gentle', 'easy'. Better to actively teach good manners than to avoid it and have it get worse.

Bucketz
January 4th, 2006, 02:43 PM
Stacey's ideas are valid and work for many people. I will however add our 2-cents.
We believe that you need to teach and reward the behaviors you want to encourage or discourage. By this I mean that we do put our hands right in front of the pup and teach her to make a better choice. Pups engage each other in play by starting with their mouths so it is a very natural thing for your pup to do. You as the parent need to teach her not to bite or press down on your skin - bite inhibition. You can choose not to ever let her mouth touch you but in our minds that isn't fully necessary. Mouthing is part of relationship in a puppies world and typically won't continue past toddlerhood. We let our little guys sort of suck our thumbs for comfort when we are cuddling.
You need to teach 'bite-inhibition'. Normally her mother would have taught this to her - but people usually take the pups away before she gets the chance.
If you act like a litter mate then the puppy will treat you like a litter mate - if you act like a parent the puppy will treat you with respect like a parent. You teach them like the mother would NOT like the other puppies would.
You should not shake or Alpha role a puppy and do not punish her with the crate. But that doesn't mean you can't be clear about your boundaries of right and wrong behavior. Momma would correct the biting and then give her another chance to choose better. If after a few attempts to correct her don't deter her then she would correct him intensely one last time and then walk away.
We allow a puppy to put his mouth on our hands (because puppies relate to the world through their mouths) and teach him not to use pressure on us. We position our hand intentionally with a thumb in his mouth. If he presses down at all - we firmly say "quit" in a low tone and QUICKLY press down & release on the tongue with the thumb. Don't hold your finger down, just press and release. He will want to spit your thumb out of his mouth because it is no fun. Sometimes it takes 3-5 corrections before he knows you mean business. But then continue to play with him and keep correcting the bad choices and praising the good ones. It is fast and intense but not harmful. Continue to play with him in a gentle manner - he will learn that gentle playing is more fun and lasts longer.
We also apply what we call the 'wind shield wiper' technique. Sit on the floor and the pup will likely try to leap into your lap and try to engage you in play (often using her mouth). Try to sit in a cross legged manner and have your elbows on your knees (make sense?) - have your flat hands (facing you) in your lap. When she tries to come into your space - set a boundary by swiping your hands & forearm up and down like a windshield wiper. She will venture into the zone and might make contact with your fast moving hand/arm. You are not trying to hit your pup but you are setting a boundary of respect. It is her choice to come into it or not. Typically she will try it 1-2 times and then see it is no fun and back away. Often the pup will sit or lay down right in front of you and look into your eyes. At this point you praise her good choice and CALMLY and gently stroke her head. This shows her that calm, gentle behavior gets attention. If she gets nutsy again then you do the same drill. You are simply saying this is my space and you are not permitted to just jump in and take over. I will love on you when you are calm.
The other way is to use your flat hand towards her nose and if she pops into your space you use a 'snappy' pop towards her. Again, it is her choice whether or not to come into your hands. You are not striking out at her but setting a boundary. After afew challenges she should sit down and look at you - this is when you calmy praise.
See the disadvantage we have is that we don't use our mouths to communicate physically with the pups like other dogs do. So we have to use our most available tool which is our hands/arms at times. You are never going to be as harsh as another dog would but you have every right to stop a pushy pup and set a boundary. If this behavior occurred with a small defenseless child or an elderly person - the puppy could unwittingly hurt someone. So stop the behavior now and be done with it. Use a word to help guide the pup. Like 'off', 'gentle', 'easy'. Better to actively teach good manners than to avoid it and have it get worse.

When u say press! does that men press down or press in to the throat??
Is holding muzzle shut good?
or holding here down?
let me know!!

Bucketz
January 4th, 2006, 02:44 PM
Stacey's ideas are valid and work for many people. I will however add our 2-cents.
We believe that you need to teach and reward the behaviors you want to encourage or discourage. By this I mean that we do put our hands right in front of the pup and teach her to make a better choice. Pups engage each other in play by starting with their mouths so it is a very natural thing for your pup to do. You as the parent need to teach her not to bite or press down on your skin - bite inhibition. You can choose not to ever let her mouth touch you but in our minds that isn't fully necessary. Mouthing is part of relationship in a puppies world and typically won't continue past toddlerhood. We let our little guys sort of suck our thumbs for comfort when we are cuddling.
You need to teach 'bite-inhibition'. Normally her mother would have taught this to her - but people usually take the pups away before she gets the chance.
If you act like a litter mate then the puppy will treat you like a litter mate - if you act like a parent the puppy will treat you with respect like a parent. You teach them like the mother would NOT like the other puppies would.
You should not shake or Alpha role a puppy and do not punish her with the crate. But that doesn't mean you can't be clear about your boundaries of right and wrong behavior. Momma would correct the biting and then give her another chance to choose better. If after a few attempts to correct her don't deter her then she would correct him intensely one last time and then walk away.
We allow a puppy to put his mouth on our hands (because puppies relate to the world through their mouths) and teach him not to use pressure on us. We position our hand intentionally with a thumb in his mouth. If he presses down at all - we firmly say "quit" in a low tone and QUICKLY press down & release on the tongue with the thumb. Don't hold your finger down, just press and release. He will want to spit your thumb out of his mouth because it is no fun. Sometimes it takes 3-5 corrections before he knows you mean business. But then continue to play with him and keep correcting the bad choices and praising the good ones. It is fast and intense but not harmful. Continue to play with him in a gentle manner - he will learn that gentle playing is more fun and lasts longer.
We also apply what we call the 'wind shield wiper' technique. Sit on the floor and the pup will likely try to leap into your lap and try to engage you in play (often using her mouth). Try to sit in a cross legged manner and have your elbows on your knees (make sense?) - have your flat hands (facing you) in your lap. When she tries to come into your space - set a boundary by swiping your hands & forearm up and down like a windshield wiper. She will venture into the zone and might make contact with your fast moving hand/arm. You are not trying to hit your pup but you are setting a boundary of respect. It is her choice to come into it or not. Typically she will try it 1-2 times and then see it is no fun and back away. Often the pup will sit or lay down right in front of you and look into your eyes. At this point you praise her good choice and CALMLY and gently stroke her head. This shows her that calm, gentle behavior gets attention. If she gets nutsy again then you do the same drill. You are simply saying this is my space and you are not permitted to just jump in and take over. I will love on you when you are calm.
The other way is to use your flat hand towards her nose and if she pops into your space you use a 'snappy' pop towards her. Again, it is her choice whether or not to come into your hands. You are not striking out at her but setting a boundary. After afew challenges she should sit down and look at you - this is when you calmy praise.
See the disadvantage we have is that we don't use our mouths to communicate physically with the pups like other dogs do. So we have to use our most available tool which is our hands/arms at times. You are never going to be as harsh as another dog would but you have every right to stop a pushy pup and set a boundary. If this behavior occurred with a small defenseless child or an elderly person - the puppy could unwittingly hurt someone. So stop the behavior now and be done with it. Use a word to help guide the pup. Like 'off', 'gentle', 'easy'. Better to actively teach good manners than to avoid it and have it get worse.

Can u give me an example of Alpha roles??

tenderfoot
January 4th, 2006, 03:26 PM
Just press quickly on the tongue NOT the throat :eek: .

Holding the mouth shut rarely has the effect you want - many dogs will just lunge at you more intensely when you let them go.

Alpha Rolls are not good to do - I would rather not put the thought in to your head. I mentioned it only because some people are still taught to do it. It is basically a very aggressive means of correction. We do not teach people to use this techinique.

Your intention should not be to frighten your pup. You simply want to make a quick correction and move on. If he does it again make another correction. He will get it. Then praise him for using his brain and making a good choice.

Bucketz
January 4th, 2006, 03:42 PM
Just press quickly on the tongue NOT the throat :eek: .

Holding the mouth shut rarely has the effect you want - many dogs will just lunge at you more intensely when you let them go.

Alpha Rolls are not good to do - I would rather not put the thought in to your head. I mentioned it only because some people are still taught to do it. It is basically a very aggressive means of correction. We do not teach people to use this techinique.

Your intention should not be to frighten your pup. You simply want to make a quick correction and move on. If he does it again make another correction. He will get it. Then praise him for using his brain and making a good choice.

Okay thanks

domesticzookeep
January 5th, 2006, 10:48 PM
Try spraying Bitter Apple (or other commercial anti-chew sprays) on your hands, arms, etc (it's skin safe, unless you are very sensitive..) This should help, as long as you don't have one of those crazy dogs that *LIKES* the taste.....:eek:
This worked well when my lab was a puppy.

I have even sprayed it on one of my foster dog's collars/neck to stop my second foster dog from trying continually grabbing the other dog's collar/excessive nipping. Just make sure it's safe for the dog's skin first...

Also - try giving your dog ice cubes if they are teething, & lots of toys.

Good luck.