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I need help translating my daughters french homework

StaceyB
December 13th, 2005, 06:36 PM
My daughter is doing somewhat of a story board and has to draw pictures for these sayings. Please help, I don't read french so I don't know what it says. I guess that is what you get for growing up in B.C.

De sole e jene sais pasouil est dit la maman de pierre

Alors marie magasiner son aime angela

Alors ils sont alle cher cher marie et elles sont alle au salon

Apres elles sont alle

Au cinema

Elles onr du mais souffle (popcorn) er bonbons erdu boisson

I am sure there are spelling mistakes.

Prin
December 13th, 2005, 06:56 PM
De sole e jene sais pasouil est dit la maman de pierre

Alors marie magasiner son aime angela

Alors ils sont alle cher cher marie et elles sont alle au salon

Apres elles sont alle

Au cinema

Elles onr du mais souffle (popcorn) er bonbons erdu boisson

I am sure there are spelling mistakes.
Umm, I don't know what the bold is.. (It's not french..) but the rest (literally)...

So Marie shopping her like/love Angela
So they went expensive/dear (2x) Marie and they went to the salon
After, they went
to the cinema
they have popcorn and candies and some drink

"er" should be "et", "onr" should be "ont" (for starters..)

StaceyB
December 13th, 2005, 07:05 PM
Thank you, you were a great help.

CyberKitten
December 13th, 2005, 07:23 PM
I had a differebnt take than Prin since the first sentence made me think they might be talking about Easter since two of the words are not French words at all as explained in the follwing:

Could pasouil be Pascal or Paschal? another word for Paques - here we say Joyueux Paques for Happy Easter. I do not recognize the word pasouil and it is not in a French dictionnary - even Larouuse which is equal to an Anglophone's Webster or other. Sole can be from the fish (fillet of sole or it can be another word for sabot (wooden shoe). And could jene be jeune be jeuner (to fast or fasting?) - there is no such word as jene. You really are trying to sump us- are trese words typed somewhere? Someone really wants to confuse your daughter!!!

To be frank, that whole 1st entence makes no sense to me. I'd have to guess that it means something like (VERY ROUGHLY TRANSLATED and guessing at the words) - Fillet of sole (or just sole) after fasting for Easter, said mother to Pierre. (Where are the quotes? - "Fillet of sole (or just sole) after fasting for Easter", said mom to Pierre. Then, Marie can shop with her friend Angela. Then, they went (with or something - I can't see them saying dear twice) dear Marie (something missing there with dear Marie) and went to the exhibition or show. After that, they attended the cinema. They ate popcoprn, candy and had drinks. (often means liquor but more often in France than in Canada).

Cher can be expensive but that is more European - we say it here but you don't see it in textbooks. Cher = expensive is slang tho you do hear it the other way as slang in La - ie alors, cher, what are you up to? My grade one teacher (I attended emlementary school in French) would admonish us when we used cher to mean expensive. She was VERY picky!!! Soeur Jaqueline but I adored her!! As an Irish woman, my grandmother also used the word "dear" to refer to some product she thought was overpriced and I still hear in Dublin in the summer.

My take for what it's worth, lol


De sole e jene sais pasouil est dit la maman de pierre

Alors marie magasiner son aime angela

Alors ils sont alle cher cher marie et elles sont alle au salon

Apres elles sont alle

Au cinema fasting

Elles onr du mais souffle (popcorn) er bonbons erdu boisson

Inverness
December 13th, 2005, 07:38 PM
I had to try and make up the missing words for you and sentences 2 and 3 still don't make perfect logical sense. This would not win a Pulitzer, but I didn't redo the sentences, just put the letters and words back in order... ;)

Désolée, je ne sais pas où il est, dit la maman de Pierre.
Sorry, I don't know where he is, said Pierre's mom.

Alors, Marie est allée magasiner avec son amie Angela.
So, Marie went shopping with her friend Angela.

Alors, ils sont allés chercher Marie et elles sont allées au salon.
So, they went to pick up Marie and they went to the hairdresser.

Après, elles sont allées au cinéma.
Then, they went to the movies.

Elles ont mangé du maïs soufflé (popcorn), des bonbons et des boissons gazeuses.
They ate popcorn, candies and soft drinks.

diandpat
December 13th, 2005, 07:53 PM
My guess it that this young lady is reading from a dictee they had in class today so it needs to be approached more phonetically.


"Desole, je ne sais pas ou it est" dit la maman de Pierre"

I am sorry, I do not know where he is" says Pierre's mother

Alors Marie est allee magasiner avec son amie Angela

So Marie went shopping with her friend Angela

Alors elles sont allee chercher Marie et elles sont allee au salon

So they went to find Marie and they went to the salon (hair?)

Apres elles sont allee au cinema

After, they went to the cinema

Elles ont du mais souffle (popcorn) et des bonbons et de la boisson

They have popcorn, candies, and drinks. (suspect there is a verb missing in this sentence)

There are also a bunch of accents missing as my keyboard is English and have never really had the need to switch it so I really don't know how!:eek:

Hope this helps. Tell your daughter not to get discouraged...my siblings and I were also English mother tongue in French school in 70's and we all made out just fine. Being bilingual is the best gift my parents gave me.:thumbs up

StaceyB
December 13th, 2005, 11:19 PM
Thanks everyone, you have all been very helpful. I am sorry I only posted the parts that she didn't have pictures for. That may be what made it more confusing.
I am no good at reading french but I can pick up several spoken words.
Ask me the french words for obedience cues and I can tell you as I have many french students but not much good for anything else.

CyberKitten
December 14th, 2005, 02:05 AM
I find this all so interesting - the different takes. I did not look at it phonetivally - that system is long out of date in the school system (kind went out with the baby boomers and my generation just after them) - and used NB French which differs from Quebec French and le Francais International. Salon here is usually a room, we have a clinic I do visits in has a meeting room called Salon Berthier for example. I;d never consider it a hairdresser - maybe in France tho -or in English, the salon, ssaid the English way. I call my hairdresser a coiffeuse. (sp?) - too lazy to look it up, lol

But why is someone learning Le F International? In Canada, we are supposed to be doing the language of our own country. It is like here we say auto more than voture for car and le fin de semaine while in France they say le weekend (In Que, sometimes too)


I never thought of it being a dictee, that may well be what it was. We did those in high school though not in my elementary actual French school. They do not do dictees here any more tho in teaching French as a second language.

And I missed that desole, I am sure that is exactrly what it is!!!! (I am on my laptop which does not have a number pasd to do the accents, sigh!)

Anyway- very interesting! (Said in my Best Sgt Scultz manner, lol)

Prin
December 14th, 2005, 02:16 AM
LOL I said "salon" was a "salon" because that's what the Anglos I know call it, but it is a hairdresser. Does nobody else call a hairdresser "the salon"?

StaceyB
December 14th, 2005, 10:15 AM
I would call it a salon if it is one that does other things besides hair. (the works)

CyberKitten
December 14th, 2005, 10:50 AM
I do not know anyone who goes to the salon. My neighbour's daughter - is a hairdresser - much to their dismay(They are professionals whose children are university degrees - and think the job of hairdresser not acceptable but I think if she enjoys it, why not? She has since however used her art history degree to open an art studio (Her paintings and portraits are wonderful and she lovesd Van Gogh) but still does "hair" or as we say in French, hairs, lol Anyway, I asked her what the official title is when she registers and she is a coiffeuse. The male eqiv is coiffeur. And she never worked in a salon but a shop - in French, she works in a clinique or studio.. I think salon is an older term. She is also a licenced esthéticien and électrolyste.

maddoxies
December 14th, 2005, 01:19 PM
Business Depot had/has a sale on electronic dictionaries. I bought the Sharp on sale $115 regularly $145. I live in Quebec and found it to be a good one. I am thinking of giving one to my great-niece, age 6, who is in French immersion in Ontario.

Bonne chance avec vos devoirs

Inverness
December 14th, 2005, 01:56 PM
You guys are so funny with this hairdresser thing ! :p

Actually, being a French speaking Quebecer who also happens to be a teacher of both French and English from kindergarden to university, I tried to imagine the teacher and/or the lesson behind all this. If the teacher wrote those sentences and the children just copied, well I am a little worried. If the kids wrote under dictation, that's already reassuring ! ;)

The hairdresser we call, here in Quebec, "la coiffeuse" or "le salon de coiffure", hence the word "salon" who can be used on its own in this type of conversation.

I wonder how long this funny conversation could go on before we are accused of threadjacking ! :D

Puppyluv
December 14th, 2005, 02:55 PM
Wow.... that transcript (the original french one) truly demonstrates how essential accents are in French writing... I had to give it a couple of reads before I had any idea of what it was talking about:o

Prin
December 14th, 2005, 04:48 PM
Business Depot had/has a sale on electronic dictionaries. I bought the Sharp on sale $115 regularly $145. I live in Quebec and found it to be a good one. I am thinking of giving one to my great-niece, age 6, who is in French immersion in Ontario.

Bonne chance avec vos devoirs
I used to be so jealous of the one "rich" girl in the class who had the electronic dictionary... Here's the rest of us thumbing through the paper version and she's just typing it in and BAM! she has the answer in 4 different languages... Whatever. :D

StaceyB
December 14th, 2005, 05:39 PM
Ok I need some help again.

I need to translate this into french in a simple manner.

Marie went to her house to see if Pierre was there. Her mother said no.

Marie walked to Pierres house and asked his mother if he was there. She said no he is not home

Marie decided to go to Angelas and ask if she would go with her to the mall.

Marie and Angela shopped for a ballet tutu and slippers for their ballet class.

When they were done shopping they went to the salon to have their hair and nails done.

They left the mall and went to the movie.

They had popcorn, candy and drinks.

After the movie Marie and Angela went to their ballet class with their new outfits.

Marie and Angela had a busy day and were now ready for bed.

Inverness
December 14th, 2005, 07:14 PM
I hope your daughter's teacher is not a member here, or your girl is gonna have a hard time convincing her teacher she did the homework herself ! ;)

Come on, Mesaana, your turn now !

mesaana
December 14th, 2005, 08:35 PM
Funny girl, Inverness!!!

Marie est allée chez elle pour voir si Pierre y était. Sa mère a dit non.

Marie a marché jusqu'à la maison de Pierre et a demandé à sa mère s'il était là. Sa mère a dit non, il n'est pas à la maison.

Marie a décidé d'aller chez Angela et de lui demander si elle viendrait avec elle au centre commercial.

Marie et Angela ont magasiné pour un tutu et des chaussons pour leur cours de ballet.

Quand elles ont eu fini de magasiner, elles sont allées au salon pour une manucure et une coiffure.

Elles ont quitté le centre commercial et sont allées au cinéma.

Elles ont pris du maïs soufflé, des bonbons et des boissons gazeuses.

Après le cinéma, Marie et Angela sont allées à leur cours de ballet avec leurs nouveaux ensembles.

Marie et Angela ont eu une journée occupée et étaient maintenant prêtes à se coucher.

First draft, feel free to amend as required ;)

Edited to add: I didn't read the whole thread... maybe this is too much? I'll go look for your daughter's age...

Lyne

StaceyB
December 14th, 2005, 08:46 PM
She is 10, grade 5.
This is what she wants to say. Seeing as I can't really help I atleast have to know what it should look like so when she does it I can correct her.

Inverness
December 14th, 2005, 08:52 PM
Funny girl, Inverness!!!

Thanks ! I knew you would enjoy it ! :D

mesaana
December 14th, 2005, 08:52 PM
Ok, then. If you have specific questions about what she wrote, don't be shy to ask...

Lyne

Puppyluv
December 14th, 2005, 10:05 PM
Errrr I'd be a little wary of using these translations if she's only 10... what verb tenses has she learned? What pronouns? Mesaana's translation is excellent, but it might be too excellent: if it's beyond the material they have covered in class, she'll have some explaining to do... Just a thought.

BMDLuver
December 14th, 2005, 10:11 PM
10 is grade 5 in Ontario I believe so her French should be at that point by now or close to it? I think it's just being used as a guideline by Mom so that little corrections can be made. :thumbs up

StaceyB
December 14th, 2005, 10:13 PM
If you check her first draft you can get an idea of what she is doing.
Unfortunately she was working with another girl who wrote down some of it. It was supposed to be a group project that got messed up.
I want to be able to correct her as she writes it out but I don't want her to be using speach that she has yet to learn. The problem is I don't know what it says so I am of little help.

mesaana
December 14th, 2005, 10:17 PM
Puppyluv, I think you're right... probably a bit too good. But since I don't know about what they really learned, it's hard to adapt it. And as Stacey said, it's a guide for her. :)

Prin
December 15th, 2005, 12:12 AM
It's too good for me- the "y était" part? I don't say that yet... I'd say "était là" instead...:o

CyberKitten
December 15th, 2005, 02:53 AM
I'd make one edit - do I dare, lol It is just that in NB - we say if someone is home, (ie Monique is home, Monique est chez elle - so would you not say au lieu de "Sa mère a dit non, il n'est pas à la maison", ' ("Sa mere a dit no, il n'est pas chez il or il n'est pas uci.") and I would call it une classe de ballet, pas un cours - I tbink course conveys one thing, an a class means something else, n'est pa????

Like if I am home and someone calls, I would say "je suis chez moi" or occasionally more formally, "je suis a mom bureau" or "Je suis a l'hopital mais apres ca, c;est neceesaire d'aller chez moi pour les chats." Anyway, whatever, lol

We also call a mall un mail but Centre commercial is more formal.

I do think it neat how words and phrases are different in various locations tho of course the same if true in English with my dad - an Irishman by birth calling French fries "chips" and elevators "lifts" tho he does not say take away instead of take out, lol He is too "North Americanized for that I guess, lol".

Inverness
December 15th, 2005, 11:39 PM
I'd make one edit - do I dare, lol It is just that in NB - we say if someone is home, (ie Monique is home, Monique est chez elle - so would you not say au lieu de "Sa mère a dit non, il n'est pas à la maison", ' ("Sa mere a dit no, il n'est pas chez il or il n'est pas uci.")

Actually, in a spoken conversation, we'd say "Il n'est pas là" or "Il n'est pas ici". I think Lyne was trying to do a word for word translation there. Which I guess a 10 year old would do. ;)

and I would call it une classe de ballet, pas un cours - I tbink course conveys one thing, an a class means something else, n'est pa????
In Quebec, we hardly use the word "une classe" to mean a lesson. We'd use "un cours de ballet" for "a ballet class" and "une classe de ballet" for "a ballet classroom". Did I lose you just there... :confused: Your French sounds more French than Quebec French. Where did you learn it ?

We also call a mall un mail but Centre commercial is more formal.


We never say "mail", except when the actual name of the shopping centre is "mail", like in "Mail Champlain". We'd say "centre d'achats", but it doesn't look really good, so if I had been writing it, I, too, would have said "centre commercial".

But hey, who knows, maybe StaceyB's daughter's teacher if from NB ??? :D

Prin
December 16th, 2005, 03:07 AM
Yeah, in school we were always taught Centre Commercial...

oh and "classe" can also be the kids... Like
"Benjamin,
je prends mon bain
devant toute la classe!"
(That was what we sang to make fun of Benjamin, but looking back, I think we weren't too good at teasing...:o )

CyberKitten
December 16th, 2005, 05:09 AM
Not sure what you mean by my French sounds like French - do you mean France, lol?

I find this all so intriging - the different words and phrases. Here in NB, there are different words in fact used from one Acadian village to another. In fact, when I studied La Saguine by Antonnine Maillet - I had to translate the old Acadian French she uses to the French I had grown up with. That said tho, I was immesnely pleased amost to discover that I recognzied some of the words and phrases from my childhood when I spent time at my grandparents' home in an Acadian Village (They had emigarted from Ireland and enrolled my dad and his brother in French schools though). You should hear HIS accent, lol (kIdding - he speaks rather good French!).

You see - or you prob know - many of the old Acadian words derive from really ancient French. I recall one of my gram's neighbours - who ran what we now call un depanneur - complaining about customers from Quebec whose French she did not understand - and this woman was une Acadienne.

To reply to your question - before I go off on one of my tangents, lol - my parents enrolled me in a French Catholic elementary school so I learned my French from the nuns and teachers at that school (Les Filles de Jesus whose maison mere was in Trois Rivieres) tho my most beloved teacher - Seour Georges (no longer a nun now tho, quite common these days) - came from Percé, Quebec and spoke almost no English. I learned much of my initial grammer from her.

I also of course learned from my Acadien and Acadienne friends and neighbours and well, just the way we spoke at home and in various locales.

In grade seven, I went to the Convent of the Sacred Heart - and Anglish school. It was a commomn practice to educate one's children first in French and then in English so they would be better prepared for unirsity. This was trie mostly of Francophone families but some Anglophones (like Irish Catholics - you did not see Protestant Anglos in a French school, now that I think about it)

Later, I studied at l'Université de Moncton - in the summer since I felt I was missing my French - and at Laval. I also took a few courses at the Sorbonne when my ex husband - who teaches French to English tho now he is in Arizona teaching English to Spanish people and also some French.

Where did you learn your French?

Luvmypit
December 16th, 2005, 04:32 PM
I always wished that I had learned french.. We had only of only a few Catholic Elementary schools that had a full French Immersion class. You had to make the choice before you entered grade 2. Unfortunantly my mom thought I had enough trouble with English.

But I so want to learn French. I was even thinking of taking an evening course. Do you think its too late? Im 25. How long will it take to learn basic francais?

Oui oui moi moi..... Voulez vous coucher avec moi ce soir. Parlez vous francais.... And that is about all I know....

What would be a best way to learn, omline course, tutor, beginner french course, tapes?

Sorry I didnt really mean to highjack so I apoligize to Stacey and anyone can PM.

Inverness
December 16th, 2005, 06:00 PM
Not sure what you mean by my French sounds like French - do you mean France, lol?

Yes, that's what I meant. Some L2 French teachers in Canadian provinces other than Quebec are from France and their vocabulary is not the one we use in Quebec on a normal, daily conversation. Which sometimes makes conversations with a non-francophone sound odd. Same thing when I lived in England and was "accused" of speaking too much like "in the books" (and too American, but that's another story !).

Where did you learn your French?

French is my first language so I simply learnt it at home and in school. English is my second and that's where you could see it's not totally natural. It shows quite obviously when I speak and on many occasions, I guess, when I write !

Inverness
December 16th, 2005, 06:03 PM
I always wished that I had learned french.. We had only of only a few Catholic Elementary schools that had a full French Immersion class. You had to make the choice before you entered grade 2. Unfortunantly my mom thought I had enough trouble with English.

But I so want to learn French. I was even thinking of taking an evening course. Do you think its too late? Im 25. How long will it take to learn basic francais?

Oui oui moi moi..... Voulez vous coucher avec moi ce soir. Parlez vous francais.... And that is about all I know....

What would be a best way to learn, omline course, tutor, beginner french course, tapes?

Sorry I didnt really mean to highjack so I apoligize to Stacey and anyone can PM.

You can PM me if you want private lessons, but I'm sorry to say I've really never taught anyone how to say "Voulez-vous coucher avec moi ?"... unless anyone wants to be slapped in the face or something... :D

Prin
December 17th, 2005, 02:04 AM
It's never too late if you have a knack for languages. Some people just pick up languages really quickly.

CyberKitten
December 17th, 2005, 08:42 AM
Inverness, that is interesting - tho in France, I was told I had an Acadien accent, sometimes a Cdn accent and when I speak English, outside of the Maritimes, I am often asked why I do not have a Maritime accent. I have no great reply for that because I simply do not know other than the fact my mother's parents are from NYC and Halifax respectively though one speaks very elegant upstate NY English and the other the very proper English she learned at The Convent of the Sacred Heart, with her Jewish mother's Russian accent. My mom always spoke very concise English and corrected grammar incessantly which alas, I often want to do. I am frustrated when I see ppl write phrases like "We did good last night" or - the old good and well rule and the use of it and it's really bugs me - you know the correct phrase would be - The groups lost its way rather than the contraction It's which is very informal yet you see it in newspapers (where are the goof editors? or even in reports by some of my Residents as in "The patient was doung very good", arrrrrrrrrggggggggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!

Of course the same is true in French - you know gar for garcon and all that joyal in Quebec and chaque in Acadie - tho some of the old Acadien words have been accorded some credence by Antonnine Maillet. An example that comes to mind is when we were arguing as kids with friends and someone said "oh shut up" - not being nasty, just a euphemism for stop it or that's enough of that - not to be confused with the expression now used by some teens and tweenies "shut up" as an expression of surprise and delight. The right way to say shut up (if there actually is one, lol - why did I pick this example, lol) would be fermez vote bouche if you are being formal but of course if you are with friends, you will be informal so it should be ferme ta bouche. We would say ferme ta oiel. (sounds like fum ty yell) - Turns out oiel is an old French word which the Acadians prob brought with them to the new world. Just like if you asked someone Comment t'allzez vous as you should, we never did that, we just ask ca va? of if we want to be proper (not be confused with the French word prope, lol), we might deign to ask Comment ca va? Just like we interchange between saying "It's nothing" when someone says thanks, we might say "ah, c;est rien" to friends but to my patients I would say "Il n'y a pas de croit"

Puppyluv, it is NEVER too late to learn languages!!! And you are still young at 25! You could enroll in a class but at the same time join a group of something or other that is entirely in French or even do an immersion summer school. (There are some like those in Trois Pistols that last 3 wks).

I should emphasize that I did not study French Immersion - I attended a French school. There is quite a difference between how English children are taught in Immersion and one is taught in a French school/class. Not at all the same.

I am currently learning Irish Gaelic - and I took courses in Ireland while I was there teaching. I now teach basic Irish Gaelic while still learning at higher levels. The Irish in Ireland tell me I speak it with a Canadian accent - it is very thrilling that young Irish children learn Irish in elementary school and where once it was heard mainly in the west of the Ireland, you now hear it on the streets of Dublin. My grandmother spoke Gaelic to me so I had somewhat of a head start but there were no TV programs or friends to talk to - other than when we visited her home in Galway - so it was impossible to develop. This was quite different than French which we heard on TV all the time - and for a large part of my life, were watched TV in French - and radio as well - at home. Tho there was much English music, lol

I am also trying to improve my very bad Hebrew - another family heritage thing and I took a course in Latin which was exceedingly helpful in medical school - more so than any physics course!! imho anyway!!!! Helped to recall terms when i started out.

I find it interesting to listen to the English political candidates speak French, some of them suffering thru it - and to be honest, making us suffer along with them tho I do admire their ambition to learn, at our taxpayer expense of course! You can tell the Anglicisms so often!! I often wonder if I note such things, how much speakers whose first langage is French feel?

Inverness, where did you get your handle? Are you from Cape Breton?