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x-rays showed hip dysplasia

kayla
December 9th, 2005, 04:44 PM
Well the x-rays showed that Kayla has some minor hip dysplasia :( Her femur is a little flat and doesn't sit quite right in the socket. They also said her right hip muscles are too loose, which is weird because I thought it was her left leg that seemes the worst. My vet is referring me to a specialist next to decide what to do about it, if anything. At least they didn't say it was really bad, but because she is only 1.5 years old it is something I will always have to watch. Hopefully the specialist will be able to give me more information. I hope it doesn't require surgery, she is a super hyperactive dog and it would be hard keeping her quite for the weeks it would heal. She is still very drugged right now I just brought her home. She can hardly walk straight, she came home and crashed on the floor couldn't even make it to her bed, I've never seen her so unactive.

Anyways, if anyone has some experience with hip dysplasia I would love to hear it. I heard massage can be good. I'm guessing swimming could be good too unfortunately it's freezing here now so that's not exactly an option. Are there any good diets? How often do they suggest surgery for hip dysplasia? I'm hoping to be able to prevent it getting any worse, and hopefully I can avoid surgery on it. I'd love any info anyone has.

Lissa
December 9th, 2005, 04:54 PM
Oh no! I am so sorry!:(

My friends shih tzu was from a BYB and diagnosed with hip displasia at 1.5 years. Hers was REALLY bad though and to make matters worse she only had 3 legs...she would have needed an immediate operation on one hip, then once she recovered from that she would have to have the other one done. Apparently, she was already in pain so they chose to have her PTS:sad: .

It sounds like Kayla's hips aren't that bad...I hope the specialist has some encouraging news/ideas...

I definately think that massage/acupuncture and swimming are excellent ideas for dogs with hip displasia; also, you'll want to keep her nice and trim...there's so much available for dogs with such problems that I'm sure Kayla's life is going to be full, long and happy!

I would start looking at homeopathic and alternative medicines, it will hopefully keep her away from "traditional" meds that will be much harder on her organs!

Good luck...and keep is posted:)

LavenderRott
December 9th, 2005, 05:29 PM
If it is minor then you are going to need to keep Kayla lean and in shape. Swimming is excellent, but you are right, seasonal.

Adding glucosomine and chondrontine to her meals should help also. I used to give it to Chase when she got older. I bought the human supplements at the local drug store, opened the pill and sprinkled it over her food at dinner time.

I am sure that the specialist will have some more excellent suggestions. Personally, if it is really mild, I would avoid surgery.

kayla
December 9th, 2005, 08:09 PM
Yes I hear keeping them lean is good, although problem now is how do I do it? Fetch seems to be the hardest on her, but it's also her favorite game in the world. She will play a bit with other dogs but she's more interested in me and her ball. Walking is good but not enough excercise for her, she needs to run. I play at least 1-2 hours of fetch with her every day, if I had to give her the same amount of excercise through just walking it would probably take more like 4 hours. Too bad I can't play fetch in the water, that would really be the best option here. She's pretty hyperactive and not very piggy so being overweight shouldn't be a problem for her though.

I've never heard of chondrontine, is that similar to glucosamine? How much of these supplements should a 70lb dog get? I went to a pet food store looing for a food for joints but couldn't find any. I'm sure I've seen it before though so I'll have to try another store tomorrow.

I agree Lissa that keeping her away from the traditional meds would be preferable, I'm a much bigger fan of holistic methods. I doubt many vets would know much about holistic health though, well not if they're anything like most human doctors.

Kayla is still fast asleep, she got up once to eat something and pee. When she's up her ears are back and tail down she looks like she's coming off a bad trip, I wonder what they used to sedate her.

Anyways, thanks for the advice, I appreciate it!

Prin
December 9th, 2005, 08:32 PM
That's such sad news! :( They can't do anything to fix it or to help her?

I think the reason the left leg would bug her more is because she'd be favoring it.

kayla
December 9th, 2005, 08:58 PM
I'm not sure what they will be able to do to help her. The vet didn't know too much but the specialist should be able to figure out what to do next. Hopefully she won't need any surgery, maybe it's just a matter of putting her on supplements or something, I hope...

Prin
December 9th, 2005, 09:04 PM
Well, if the femur is straight, I don't know what they can do... I think it's easier if the acetabulum (hole in the hip in which the femur sits) isn't deep enough. They can just grind it deeper. I don't know what they would do for a straight femur other than cutting the head off and reconstructing it at more of an angle...:eek:

maddoxies
December 9th, 2005, 09:12 PM
All 3 of my golden had hip dysplasia. My first girl had Grade 3 dysplasia and lived to aged 16.5

Most large breed dog foods these days have G and C added. I also got a glucosimine/condroitin powder from the vet; 1/2 tsp mixed in a bit of water twice a day

Weight is important. My Champ did best on Nutro Large Breed Weight Management. Treats had to be monitored and included in his daily caloric intake.

Gentle exercise is good for muscle tone and weight. Try to minimize stairs and slippery floors. Nice soft bed for the hips too. I bought a piece of MDF (medium density fibreboard) and made a ramp for him to get in and out of the van. I put a scrap of carpet on it for traction and a handle on the back for me to manipulate it easier.

I know it is distressing news, but HD can be managed and your baby can still have a long and happy life.

kayla
December 9th, 2005, 09:13 PM
Well, if the femur is straight, I don't know what they can do... I think it's easier if the acetabulum (hole in the hip in which the femur sits) isn't deep enough. They can just grind it deeper. I don't know what they would do for a straight femur other than cutting the head off and reconstructing it at more of an angle...:eek:

OMG I don't even want to think about what a painful operation that would be :eek: . Apparently they can do entire hip replacement, but I've just read about this briefly in my google searches and don't really know what part they replace or how. I'm worried about it turning into arthritis later on in life too, ugh, poor baby.

Prin
December 9th, 2005, 09:16 PM
Well, replacing the hip wouldn't fix it if it's the femur that's the problem...

kayla
December 9th, 2005, 09:24 PM
Gentle exercise is good for muscle tone and weight. Try to minimize stairs and slippery floors. Nice soft bed for the hips too. I bought a piece of MDF (medium density fibreboard) and made a ramp for him to get in and out of the van. I put a scrap of carpet on it for traction and a handle on the back for me to manipulate it easier.

Hmmm, I live on the second floor and she goes up and down stairs all the time, I will be moving in a few months though so this won't be a problem for much longer. She doesn't like getting into my car much either, she usually just puts her front paws up and I lift the rest of her in. The board is a good idea though, where would you get such a thing?

She's a healthy weight as far as I know, the vet has never mentioned she needs to lose anything, but is it better that I maybe even keep her on the skinnier side? I guess I'll ask the specialist about her weight, she did recently gain a few pounds when my last foster was here (she gets piggy when I have fosters) but she's lost it again and is looking pretty trim. She didn't even gain that much, maybe 3 or 4 pounds.

Prin
December 9th, 2005, 09:26 PM
LOL Poor doggy! First she can't jump around, and now she's on a diet too!? Tough break.:D

maddoxies
December 9th, 2005, 09:33 PM
I sent you a pm with some info on ramps, steps and lift devices :thumbs up

Lissa
December 9th, 2005, 10:48 PM
Here are a few books that might be of interest:

The Healing Touch for Dogs: The proven massage program for dogs
Canine Massage: A complete reference manual
Body Work for Dogs: Connecting through massage, acupressure and intuitive touch DVD
Getting in Ttouch with your Dog (I really like Linda Tellington-Jones - she has lots of stretches that will probably be quite good for Kayla)...

Stretches and keeping her warm will probably also help keep her in happy and less stiff.

Are there places where you are allowed to take Kayla swimming in the summer?!

I can imagine how hard it is going to be for her to not play fetch anymore...a lot of research suggests that dogs who still do moderate exerise after diagnosed with hip dysplasia do much better then dogs that have limited exercise:).

Perhaps you could get Kayla used to hiking with you on easy trails? Maybe if you taught her to fetch certain things for you, she might learn to enjoy the aspect of retrieving instead of the running/jumping part...I know its probably doubtful, especially for a young dog:) !

I'm not sure how into training you are but maybe getting involved in obedience or trick training might be a good idea!? She may even be suitable for basic tracking classes, rally-o or therapy dog training...giving her a job might help to keep her mentally and physically sharp and eager.

BTW - I have been looking into buying Dodger a pet stroller but its so hard to find one's for larger dogs - my favourite one is the Wike Jogger but it is crazy expensive...Ebay does have a couple for bigger dogs that are only about $200 but the max weight is only about 60-65lbs.

http://www.wikestore.com/products.htm

http://cgi.ebay.ca/Happy-Trails-Pet-Stroller-Carrier-AT3-ATV-Red-Dog-NIB_W0QQitemZ7730830883QQcategoryZ20745QQrdZ1QQcmd ZViewItem

I'm sure you won't actually need one for a long time...just letting you know that this is out there tool!

kayla
December 11th, 2005, 10:42 AM
Thanks for all that info LIssa! My biggest problem is that I'm stuck in a city right now, so no nearby hiking trails or anything. Occassionally I can take her on the weekend to go hiking, but most of the hiking parks around here don't even allow dogs. She swims in the summer, in any water she can see she jumps in! She's a major water dog, if there's one thing she loves more than fetch it's fetch in the water, so at least there is this. I talked to a girl at the park who has a lab with hd and she said her vet recommended taking her into the deep snow for running to build up muscle, this was after a hip replacement surgery. Yesterday I just took Kayla for a long walk but it didn't seem like enough excercise for her, I've got to figure out more.

I think I will go onto amazon now and look up those books, thanks again!

JDG
December 11th, 2005, 02:02 PM
Get better soon you silly hound!

Marty and Minou send best wishes.

I'm sorry I can't offer any advice!

Joey

poodletalk
December 11th, 2005, 06:49 PM
My parents IrishWolf hound has severe hip dysphasia on both hips. With dysphasia there's two types of hip surgery's, either they can fix the hip or they need to replace the hips. Clyde went for the first surgery, but the vet called us while he was under to say his hips were too severe he needs to have full hip replacement surgery. We agreed to the surgery, but only when he's older. He's five years old, the surgery is still "down the road" Clyde was diagnosed with hip dysphasia when he was 6 months old. At the age, the poor dog was limping, because of his hips plus growing pains! We give him glucomine regularly, keep him lean and he exercises. It's important that your dog builds muscle mass around the hips, so regular runs at a field (your dog knows when to stop or slow down or even to lie down) Also,she shouldn't walk on pavement, that's hard on the hips, Clyde walks on grass, snow etc. We use to take him to the dog, but the other dogs would tackle him from the back and hang on to his hips, which would drag him to the ground! So no more dog parks! We also don't let him out for too long when it's freezing cold out, raining, drizzle etc. You need to watch out for arthritis. When he sleeps on the floor, he wakes up very stiff and he's limping, most of the time he sleeps on the guest bed which causes him no problem. When he's limping, we put a heating pad on his hips or keep him warm. The vets are very impressed with the fact Clyde doesn't still require surgery. We take him every year for a check up, the vets love he still has alot of muscle mass around his hips and he runs after my parents other dog Lucy the lab in the backyard. If this continues, hopefully he will NEVER need surgery.

kayla
December 12th, 2005, 09:52 AM
Thanks for the words of encouragement poodletalk! I hope I won't have to stop taking Kayla to the dog park, she loves it there.. I think the most difficult part in all this is figuring out how to excercise her without hurting her. She doesn't seem to know her limit, she'd go go go forever if she could. Yesterday I took her for a 4 hour walk thinking it wouldn't aggrevate her hip but after we got home I noticed her limp was back. We stopped in at the dog park for 20 mins on the way out and back so maybe this was what made her limp, although usually it's fetch, not playing, that makes her limp. I guess I will try to walk her without any stops at the park next time, although most days i don't have a spare 4 hours so it'll be hard getting her tired out..


Get better soon you silly hound!

Marty and Minou send best wishes.

I'm sorry I can't offer any advice!

Joey

Aaaaw, thanks Joey, give the moggies a hug for me (and I hope Marty is recovering well from his surgery)!

SnowDancer
December 12th, 2005, 11:34 AM
I really hope that Kayla will not require surgery in the future. But, just in case, if you have already not done so, perhaps it might be time to open a bank account specifically to start saving for this procedure. If you already have pet insurance and it happens (unlikely) to cover hip dysplasia you should be able to claim part of the costs since the hip dysplasia was not pre-existing at time you took out policy. My policy specifically excluces dysplasia but I will be okay for other knee/leg problems such as patella or cruciate since no pre-existing condition prior to sign up and wait period. When you move to Ontario you might at some point want to make a visit to the Small Animal Clinic at Guelph - great doctors there.

kayla
December 12th, 2005, 11:37 AM
Luckily I do have pet insurance through petplan which covers HD. I still have to pay 20% of any procedure but still a lot better than 100%!

SnowDancer
December 12th, 2005, 11:40 AM
Very happy to hear that petplan will cover hip dysplasia. Not to be a wet blanket, but have you read the fine print? Does it have a maximum lifetime payout for dysplasia (as with company medical plans and kids' braces - used to be $2,000 per kid). I know some plans cover major health issues with this limit - as opposed to a yearly limit for other problems such as blockages.

kayla
December 12th, 2005, 12:31 PM
I just called petplan to ask, I was kinda expecting it would cover only $2000 lifetime, but it's actually $2000 per illness per year, including hip dysplasia. The $2000 also includes any glucosamine or other supplements the vet recommends. Also, on top of the $2000/year for HD she is covered for $200/year for theraputic massage. I'm actually quite impressed with this plan since I only got the standard plan and it still covers quite a bit and is only $30/month. They also said if she needs surgery they will make arrangements to pay the $2000 directly so that I don't have to find the cash and wait for them to reimburse me.

poodletalk
December 12th, 2005, 12:40 PM
I called petplan as well for Clyde, they wouldn't cover him! The reason he's too big! He weighs 92 pounds, which is over the limit of petplan. I was very frusterated! His operation will cost 5000k per hip! That doesn't cover any medication, boarding etc. It has been 4.5 years since he was diagnoised, when I have extra money I put it in a special bank account just for him. I always plan on having a big garage sale with the money going for his operation. I just never had the time to collect good stuff for the sale. Kayla, maybe your dogs hd is not as bad as Clydes. The specialist will tell you more what to do and not what to do. Are you going to st.Hyacinthes? I am lucky though, he doesn't need to have the operation any time soon!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Dog Dancer
December 12th, 2005, 01:17 PM
So sorry to hear Kayla's diagnosis. My last dog had displaysia and we had to put her down when she was 7. She tore her ACL running the fence line one day and the vet said while they could have done the surgery on the ACL her hips were so bad that she literally wouldn't have a leg to stand on while she recovered. It was a very sad time for us. We had known for a long while that she had the condition. Also since she was about 1.5 yrs. We didn't let her run much at all, but she did like swimming - and you can play catch in the water. Don't you throw a stick or ball into the water?? The hip replacements were not an option for us, we simply couldn't afford it then ($5,000 each at the time). No jumping, no running, we even took the frame off our bed so she could climb up onto it without having to jump. She was GSD cross. I was also going to say that a lot of the large breed foods now have glucosamine and chondroitin (sp?) in them. I used to buy mine at Costco and give them to Sheba. But good luck with Kayla. The less hard impact stress on her joints the better. Too bad you're so far away or BF would be happy to build you a ramp for the van or whatever.

SnowDancer
December 12th, 2005, 01:58 PM
I decided to take a look at the Pet Plan brochure - used to be covered years ago under their premium plans - well there really only was one type of plan and that time and those darned lifetime limits and exclusions did me in. Question - they will pay the $2,000 per year - and will pay for the operation up front - BUT if say you go to Guelph for hip dysplasia surgery in Feb. 2007 and cost is $6,000 (this was cost of my Dachshund surgery so just using as an example), I am reading this as they will pay the $2,000, minus your co-pay and breed deductible and you would pay the balance of $4,000 plus. Since full $6,000 would be in one year - and hopefully we are talking about only one surgery - the fact that they would cover $2,000 the next year wouldn't help you out much in Feb. 2007??? I bounced all over the brochure looking at the top of the line plans but could not find the dreaded wording "hip dysplasia". My VetInsurance plan specifically excludes this condition, but there are no annual limits per other conditions so I am really hoping that my 22 lb. Eskie monster will not come down with it. Afraid though after too many Dachshund back episodes. Despite my very high regard for the specialists at Geulph, I hope to never see them again. Hopefully since Kayla's condition seems a bit different than dysplasia as discussed by others, costs might be more reasonable and "spreadable". I asked why VetInsurance excludes dysplasia but covers Dachshund disc disease (for the moment...) and apparently it is because so many breeds are subject to it. Well what can I say, if I have a Dachshund, we are worst case scenario times 2. Re ramps, with so many "teacup" dogs these days and senior dogs, ramps are so readily available - even at PetSmart. If I had a new Dachshund puppy, I would buy one and try to train him to use it from puppyhood. Not sure what cost is though. There is also the Bottoms Up Leash that you can get to help support pup's back end - really could have used that instead of the sling given to us by Guelph - I wasn't really experienced at manipulating it with an alpha Dachshund. Did see one though on a Bassett - the owner told me it made such a difference. Saw it listed on ads on this site.

kayla
December 12th, 2005, 02:41 PM
Snowdancer, unfortunately if her surgery is over $2000 I have to pay the rest. I'm hoping I won't need surgery and that there are other preventative measures I can take. I am going to see a specialist tonight and will find out exactly what she needs, hopefully nothing serious :fingerscr

kayla
December 12th, 2005, 02:43 PM
We didn't let her run much at all, but she did like swimming - and you can play catch in the water. Don't you throw a stick or ball into the water??

Yup, but only when it's in it's liquid state, which doesn't happen in balmy Montreal at this time of year ;)

kayla
December 12th, 2005, 02:45 PM
I called petplan as well for Clyde, they wouldn't cover him! The reason he's too big! He weighs 92 pounds, which is over the limit of petplan. I was very frusterated!

I didn't know they had a weight limit, that's really weird! Do you know what the limit is? Kayla is about 70lbs, I hope she isn't over it!:eek:

SnowDancer
December 12th, 2005, 04:29 PM
Good luck tonight. I didn't know about the weight limit either - my only hope is that while Eskimos are prone to hip dysplasia that because the little devil is a small standard at 22 lbs. he might just not get it - despite those long legs. Am making sure he keeps his weight down - not easy - but if I could do it with the mini Dachshunds - despite their gourmet tastes, I can do it with him - he is a gourmand.

poodletalk
December 12th, 2005, 05:17 PM
There was a weight limit 5 years ago, maybe things have changed today. All I know Clyde isn't eligable. His full hip replacment surgery will cost 10K. If anyone would like to donate garage sale items for the Clyde Foundation let me know! I should also add this interesting info: Clyde was born on a farm, my vet suspects he was kicked or hit exteremly hard by a car or a farm animal that caused dislocation. :sad: The dislocation was never properly healed which caused displyasia. This all happened before he was eight weeks old, because when the litter of pups turned eights old, the farmer dropped off the pups at the SPCA. (No, the SPCA didn't notice there was anything wrong with his hips because the little guy caught piro virus and almost died! When he was healthy, we adopted him at 6 months.

kayla
December 12th, 2005, 09:34 PM
OK so some good news, according to the specialist Kayla DOESN'T have HD!:) Even going to pick up the x-rays from my vet today and looking at them I didn't think anything looked wrong, everything seems to fit perfectly, so I have no idea why my vet said she does.

Less good news is that the specialist said her right hip muscles are less developed than her left, which is apparently genetic. This can cause some joint pain but he was confused why she should be limping and stiff with such a small problem like that. I mentioned that she sits on her side but he didn't say wether this was cause or effect. He wasn't very useful in any preventative suggestions, he just said don't let her get fat and to give her some prescribed pain meds when she needed them. Kinda typical western doctor style, treat the symptoms not the problem.. I asked him to write me a recommendation for glucosamine and chondrontine, so it will be covered by insurance. I've ordered a holistic healing book for dogs, guess I will just have to figure the rest out myself (and from the many helpful ideas I get here!)

kayla
December 12th, 2005, 09:39 PM
There was a weight limit 5 years ago, maybe things have changed today. All I know Clyde isn't eligable. His full hip replacment surgery will cost 10K. If anyone would like to donate garage sale items for the Clyde Foundation let me know! I should also add this interesting info: Clyde was born on a farm, my vet suspects he was kicked or hit exteremly hard by a car or a farm animal that caused dislocation. :sad: The dislocation was never properly healed which caused displyasia. This all happened before he was eight weeks old, because when the litter of pups turned eights old, the farmer dropped off the pups at the SPCA. (No, the SPCA didn't notice there was anything wrong with his hips because the little guy caught piro virus and almost died! When he was healthy, we adopted him at 6 months.

That's a sad story, I'm glad he's in good hands now though. A friend of mine at the dog park found out her lab has HD (actually it was her who inspired me to get insurance!) and she ended up getting it done at a vet school and it was much cheaper, have you looked into this? That's great you have held off on the surgery until now though!

SnowDancer
December 12th, 2005, 09:58 PM
kayla, maybe when you move to Ontario you might visit the Small Animal Clinic at Guelph and meet with one of their specialists just to get a second opinion. There are also excellent specialists operating out of the McMurrich St. Emergency Clinic in Toronto. But for middle of night surgery, Guelph it is -24 hour work-up not required and neuro came in at 11:00 p.m. to perform surgery - heck of a drive from Toronto with paralyzing dog. Under these circumstances though Guelph Vet College costs are equal to if not greater than a Toronto specialist. Especially for spinal surgery. The neuro who operated on my last little guy was a wonderful doctor - my pup adored him - but neuros aren't the specialists for hip dysplasia - have already checked that out. Hope you find something to help kayla out.

Prin
December 12th, 2005, 10:42 PM
I'm glad it's not HD. Too bad doggy athletic therapists are few and far between. (IMO, if she was human, that would be who to see...) Are there doggy physiotherapists anywhere?

poodletalk
December 13th, 2005, 11:55 AM
Kayla, did your friends dog have full hip replacement surgery or the other surgery where they cut the bone and fuse it together. If it's the second one, the operation cost 2500$. What hospital did she go to? St.Hyacthinth's or Vanier? I went to St.Hyacthinth's to see the specialist, it's also a teaching hospital.

kayla
December 13th, 2005, 07:28 PM
Poodletalk I'm not sure what kind of surgery it was, or where she got it done, although for some reason UQAM rings a bell, do they have a vet school there? Next time I run into her I will ask her the details and get back to you though!