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Teaching puppy that grooming isn't a game!! Please help!

Jenmlf
November 23rd, 2005, 03:59 PM
Ok, My little guy always thinks I'm playing when I try to brush him, clean around his eye and cut his nails. I have never played with him in this way so thats not the reason. I do try to get him used to me touching his paws, around his eyes and things so he won't freek out but it doesn't work. He trys to bite the brush or whatever I'm holding to help groom him. I really don't want the grooming thing to be this way and I don't want him to be afraid of it either but really I feel like the only thing left to do is hold him down someway and I DON'T want to resort to that.
Anyone else have/ had this problem? HOw did you stop it? Whats the secret??:crazy:

Thanks a lot everyone!
Jen

rivers
November 23rd, 2005, 04:12 PM
I have the same problem, but no solution. You beat me in posting for help, lol. My pup is 13 weeks, and also play bites the brush, my hands, her feet, anywhere where the brush is. She thinks its a game too. To do her eyes, she is getting used to me holding her face securely, and I say 'keep still' very sternly. I have to be very careful though, as she could move any second.

So anyone out there got advice on how to teach a pup to stand still to get a brush? :rolleyes:

TracyG
November 23rd, 2005, 05:14 PM
Me too folks! Last night was the first night my golden let me brush her without trying to eat the brush. The main difference was I waited until later at night (so she was more tired), and gave her a toy to chew that she hadn't seen in awhile. That's the only time I've been able to comb her without her chewing the brush/comb. I am having trouble cutting her nails. I've been handling her paws since day 1 and she's never had a bad reaction to having her nails cut...but lately she squirms and bites at the clippers and tries to wiggle away before I can cut them! Anyone got advice for that??

rivers
November 23rd, 2005, 08:21 PM
anyone got advice?

Jenmlf
November 23rd, 2005, 09:21 PM
Nice to know that I'm not alone! Now for a solution:p

I have tryed to occupy him with something like a toy and it works... sorta... ok not really but better then nothing to distract him at all! I have to get his face now and thats just impossable! AHHH Frustration!

:clown:

glasslass
November 23rd, 2005, 09:36 PM
Den-Den is sensitive to his front paws being clipped; not his back paws at all. He keeps trying to pulll them away from me. Corky is the same way. Sometimes I distract him by putting my face close to his and making kissing noises. Then while my face is getting washed thoroughly with his tongue, I can make a few swipes with the clippers.

Prin
November 23rd, 2005, 11:24 PM
Uhh.. Usually people say "my dog bites me hard and becomes aggressive when I try to brush him" and we say "try to make it a game. Try to change the mood to a more positive one"... I don't know how to do the reverse...:o

angie79
November 24th, 2005, 10:36 AM
lol i know one other person (rivers) has a ms i have a ms too is it ms's that think the comb is the best toy chew toy... of ms think everyrthing is a game.... btw makes brushing the teeth a breeze

rivers
November 24th, 2005, 10:40 AM
Angie79, funny. I think the toilet paper is her favourite chew toy! aaarggh.

angie79
November 24th, 2005, 10:42 AM
today the snow is his favoite attck toy lol its hilarious

Boubou
December 2nd, 2005, 08:57 PM
:pawprint: Hi guys,

Well, unfortunately, there are no miracle solutions to grooming your dog at home, but being a pet groomer for 17 years, I can offer some advice:

#1: Be gentle, but firm. Never scold or hit your dog, the brushing/combing experience must be made to be a pleasant one. I have seen too many dogs that have been roughly handled by owners who want to show their dog "who the boss is" - and usually these dogs are the most traumatized ones when they come to my shop. Try to have some treats, toys, another person available to help out and make it as quick as possible. I often compare dogs to young children when it comes to their ability to be patient. Asking them to be still and not move is very boring for them, especiallly if they are pups. Don't forget, they are perfectly happy looking scruffy and dirty, they don't understand WHY they have to be groomed, even if they do feel better after!

#2: Try to find a place to elevate them (such as the washer/dryer and put a rubber mat for grip). Dogs feel less secure when they are not firmly on the ground and this gives us more control for the grooming process. If it is a larger dog, investing in a portable grooming table will be a great help, especially if it is a long haired dog (such as a golden, old english sheepdog, etc.)....or a homemade one is a cheap alternative....

#3: Make sure you have the right tools for the job. Certain brushes and rakes are made for certain breeds. Sometimes, with the wrong brush you could actually be hurting your dog by scratching his skin. DO NOT depend on pet store employees to help you with this. Trust me, they know nothing when it comes to grooming your dog! Rather, visit your local groomer (if you don't have one, ask someone you know who can give you a referral) and ask them what tools would be best for your dog. You could even bring your tools with you to show her what you are currently using.

#4: If all else fails, let the groomer do it! We are better equipped, and quite frankly, the dogs are much better behaved with us!! Like children, they behave much better with strangers than with mom and dad!! Especially if you have trouble with the nails. It's just not worth traumatizing your pet over. Most groomers will do nails without an appointment and it is usually between $5 - $10, pretty cheap considering............

Good Luck!!

Cindy:pawprint: :pawprint:

Prin
December 2nd, 2005, 11:29 PM
Good tips Cindy.:thumbs up

t.pettet
December 3rd, 2005, 10:44 AM
Am also a groomer and you couldn't have been given better advice. The only other thing I would recommend is a noose (collar) with attachment to an elevated position (ceiling) so pup is restrained and less likely to attempt an escape.Also make the 1st. sessions short (2 min.) gradually building up to an overall grooming with a tiny treat and very positive happy voice every few seconds when he lets you brush out,cut nails, etc. My dogs all want to be first to get groomed (nudging each other out of the way) because when its all over and everyone is beautiful again they each get a jerky treat.