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I'm totally lost :/

jawert1
November 23rd, 2005, 03:43 PM
Sadly I find myself yet again posting in the training forums, though this time it isn't for my very dominant Peaches, it's for Simon. We had an incident this morning involving the one neighbor's Bichon Frize (sp?) pup, where she just let him run (with leash dragging) and he doesn't know "stop" or "no" and so ran, barking and growling, towards me, Peaches and Simon. I made my 2 sit, turned back around to shoo off the Bichon, and in that flash, Simon jumped around me and grabbed the Bichon and proceeded to shake it like a rabbit. Now, Simon has NEVER been an aggressive dog, he's not the one I worry about in social situations (Peaches is REALLY leash aggressive so we have the prong collar which works). I've never seen him do anything like this, he's normally GREAT with other dogs, and best I can figure is that he went total rogue Pointer on me and thought it was an attacking bunny. The Bichon was unhurt thank goodness, the owner was mortified and totally apologetic since she had let him run off like that, but how do I keep instances of this from ever happening again?

rivers
November 23rd, 2005, 04:15 PM
When you see the pooch from afar running without a leash, yell at the owner 'my dog is going to eat yours for dinner if you don't put a leash on!'

sorry.:angel:

doggy lover
November 23rd, 2005, 04:24 PM
Thats funny, I had that happen once but my dog didn't do anything. It was a dashound and it ran over growling, my dog was 120lbs and I said to the owner that my dog enjoys hot dog(weiner dog) and she soon stoped it from comming over. I have tought my dogs the word leave it and this goes from food to other animals and children. It works great. I use to have a GSP cross, when I was a kid and he would go after other dogs too. But he was very softed mouth and would not actually hurt them, thankfully.

jawert1
November 23rd, 2005, 05:01 PM
She felt bad enough that her Bichon almost got eaten that I couldn't bear to remind her that there ARE leash laws here in VA and that it's ILLEGAL for a dog to be running loose like that. And there's the small fact that Simon acted completely out of line so ya know :( I just can't get it out of my head that he acted like a hunting dog but am now going to re-enroll him in training classes since I'm convinced that the first round didn't take :/

tenderfoot
November 24th, 2005, 12:09 AM
Possibly he was helping you out. He saw you aggressing towards what seemed to be an aggressor and he thought you could use the help.
It doesnt' make it any better that he did this but it could explain his odd behavior. He was helping the pack stay safe from a potentially mean dog (even if he was tiny).
It would have been good to tell your dogs to sit/stay and then pressured the other dog to stay away - being careful that your dogs were still being good. If your dogs are trained and trustworthy then most of your worries are taken care of. So long as you can count on them to behave then you can put your efforts towards the other dog & it's person.

Lucky Rescue
November 26th, 2005, 02:14 PM
She felt bad enough that her Bichon almost got eaten that I couldn't bear to remind her that there ARE leash laws here in VA and that it's ILLEGAL for a dog to be running loose like that. And there's the small fact that Simon acted completely out of line so ya know

This person needs to be reminded of the law. The next dog her Bichon charges might do real damage. Think how bad she'll feel then.

I don't think Simon was out of line. Look at it this way - if you saw a person charging you, screaming, cursing and waving fists at you, you would probably tackle this person when he reached you, no matter how short he was. You wouldn't let someone attack you just because they are small.

I think Simon behaved very well, since he didn't injure the little dog. I fostered a greyhound who would have no doubt killed this Bichon under the same circumstances and it wouldn't have been his fault or my fault, since he was always on leash.

People need to learn to stop letting their untrained, out of control and/or aggressive dogs run loose, no matter how small they are.

PetFriendly
November 27th, 2005, 08:33 PM
A lure for dog racing is a small white fluffy thing that moves quickly and unpredictably.. Sound familiar? Combine that with your displeasure and poor Simon didn't have a chance.

Of all the dogs in puppy kindergarden, Charley was the only white one, and the only one that any of the bigger retrievers took any interest in chasing.

StaceyB
November 27th, 2005, 08:50 PM
All dogs smell like dogs so even if they are small they are still dogs and are not mistaken for a different species. There are other reasons to show interest such as running and spinning so others usually want to play.

StaceyB
November 27th, 2005, 09:48 PM
Has the dog that was envolved in this incident been around the other while it was showing aggressive behaviour towards other dogs. It is also quite possible that you become nervous because of your aggressive dog when others approach and your other one has now begun to respond to it.

jawert1
November 28th, 2005, 11:32 AM
Nope Stacey, he's never been aggressive with other dogs, including another owner had their 2 puppies out (1 rottie, 1 minpin) and he was fine with them - even when the rottie pup started trying to be all tough, Simon just laid down and played with them (and they were both the same size as this Bichon). Peaches is the leash aggressive one, and she sat like an angel the whole time.

BernerLver
November 28th, 2005, 03:12 PM
People need to learn to stop letting their untrained, out of control and/or aggressive dogs run loose, no matter how small they are.

I totally agree with this statement. Bailey and I have had to change our morning walking route because of a woman with a tiny dog like this who allows it to be outside offleash and won't control it.

When I had words with her she had the nerve to tell me it was my larger dog (BMD who was on leash sitting quitely beside me) that was the problem. He was making her dog nervous! :mad:

jawert1
November 28th, 2005, 06:36 PM
If nothing else, I'm looking at it as an opportunity to really work on continued training for my two. That and I very sneakily left a flyer for free puppy classes at a local community college in the girl's mother's door (she stays with her mother occasionally - mom has an obnoxious pug sadly), so perhaps she'll take the hint and the scare in the same way I did and do something positive with a rotten situation.

coppperbelle
November 28th, 2005, 09:18 PM
This past summer a new neighbor moved in with her Pug. A few months back I was walking my dogs and she was coming towards me with her dog. Her dog was not tied and she had no control over him. I told my guys to sit and they did and her dog came running over growling. My dogs went nuts of course and she ran over to get hold of her dog. As she was walking away she said something to the the effect that she thought goldens were nice dogs.
She now walks by everyday with this dog unleashed and allows him to pee on every poll and tree they go by.

PetFriendly
November 28th, 2005, 09:21 PM
Ok, so I work at City Hall and share a floor with the by-law group. I explained the story about the small dog charging and the bigger dog, while on leash and under control, biting said small dog. The officers I spoke with said that the bite, had it punctured, would have been 'provoked' and the owner of the small dog would have a hard time making a case for a muzzle order on the bigger dog. It is their opinion that charges would not have been laid, but the owner of the small dog would have gotten a warning for not being in control of the dog.