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new puppy decisions

Beetlecat
November 13th, 2005, 11:57 AM
I am considering getting a new puppy and I have some questions.

My current dog is an almost 1.5 year old neutered male. He is fairly timid and submissive. What personality type would be best in the new puppy to get along well?

I would probably prefer an adult dog, but I know this pup's parents (it was an 'oops' litter with a definite father) and I can visit as they get older to pick the right one (they are only about 2 weeks old right now). And heelers are hard to find in the shelters.

So I am thinking of leaving the pup at the breeder's home so I do not have to deal with all the 'puppy issues' right off the bat. The upstairs renters complain about enough already. Would there be a 'best' age to introduce it to life in the city and life away from home. Would it be better to shuttle it back and forth a few times, or is a clean break the best? At what age do puppies have reasonable bladder control? I do not have a crate anymore, hence why I'd prefer to wait until it can 'hold it' for a longer time.

And the last question is the most important. My city has a bylaw stating each household can only have 3 dogs and 6 cats. I live in a house and the renters upstairs already have 2 dogs. What is considered a household? The family unit or the physical building? Who could I contact to figure this out?

Beetlecat
November 13th, 2005, 12:28 PM
And the last question is the most important. My city has a bylaw stating each household can only have 3 dogs and 6 cats. I live in a house and the renters upstairs already have 2 dogs. What is considered a household? The family unit or the physical building? Who could I contact to figure this out?

Never mind this last question. I found the bylaw information.

(1) No person shall keep or have more than three Dogs, Restricted Dogs, or any combination thereof on any premises with a municipal address in the City.


So does the fact that I'm in a basement suite matter here? Or is that still considered the same address as upstairs...

But, just in case I do move or the folks upstairs do, please still give me your opinions on the other questions :)

kayla
November 13th, 2005, 01:58 PM
If you have a male I would look at female puppies, opposite sex tends to get along best. Do you take your current dog to the park? What sort of dog does he play with? Does he like more outgoing dogs? Dominant ones, submissive ones?

Puppies can hold their bladder for around their age in months plus one. For example a 2 month old pup can hold it for 3 hours, 3 month for four hours etc. Some pups can be clean at around 6 months but many take longer.

Do you have a separate address than the family above? How does your mail get separated? Is your electrical bill separate or on one?

mona_b
November 13th, 2005, 08:55 PM
Since the bylaw states only 3 dogs(our bylaw is the same here),I would forget about getting this pup.You live in a house that you rent,correct?And you already have one,and the people upstairs have two,well that's the bylaw limit right there.If you get this pup and word gets out that there are 4 dogs living there,then one will have to go.I don't think you want to get this pup only yo have to rehome it.

The only thing that would be different at your address is the last names of the people who live there.The address stays the same.

Beetlecat
November 14th, 2005, 12:36 AM
If you have a male I would look at female puppies, opposite sex tends to get along best. Do you take your current dog to the park? What sort of dog does he play with? Does he like more outgoing dogs? Dominant ones, submissive ones?


He has been to the park, though it's not too often that there are other dogs there. Far as I can tell, he likes to play with all dogs of all types and all sizes. He has never been less than friendly though I've never had a situation where another dog has tried to dominate him. I think he would fight back, if he figured he could win. The tiny, nippy ones he seems to ignore. Not worth his attention, I guess :)

Beetlecat
November 14th, 2005, 12:56 AM
Since the bylaw states only 3 dogs(our bylaw is the same here),I would forget about getting this pup. If you get this pup and word gets out that there are 4 dogs living there,then one will have to go.

That's depressing.. and totally unfair :yuck: So if they had moved in with three dogs, I wouldn't have been allowed to have any!!? Too horrible to contemplate...

My other choice is to do a sort of.. hmm.. sharing of the dog. It will live at another home (in the country) but be considred mine and I would visit and take it on trips with my other dog and such...

.. hmm.. that sounds worse than it is. It would know me and my dog already and I could stay for long periods of time and give it attention then. Consider it long term boarding. And if I do the same summer job as last year, we could spend the whole summer together.

hmm.. that still sounds bad. sorry I can't explain it better. :sad:

The sane thing is probably to forget the dog for now, but my housing situation is likely to change in the (hopefully near) future and I would really prefer to get a dog I know from a source I know and trust. And to be able to be there as it grows up...

mona_b
November 14th, 2005, 06:08 AM
So if they had moved in with three dogs, I wouldn't have been allowed to have any!!

Sorry to say,but probably not.

As for "sharing" the dog,this is something I couldn't do.If it couldn't be with me all the time,then I wouldn't get one.But that's just me....:)

SnowDancer
November 14th, 2005, 08:42 AM
I agree totally with Mona. I understand that you really want to get a second dog, but it just isn't feasible under the circumstances. In your original post, you mentioned that you were already experiencing difficulties with the upstairs tenants - I think a second dog in a basement suite would only add to your problems. Sometimes the thought is better than the reality. I hope you one day are able to have 2 dogs and that there temperaments are such that you can leave the house, go to another room etc. without worry that one turns out to be a bully "alpha want to be" and goes after the other. Not pretty.

kayla
November 14th, 2005, 09:07 AM
What exactly do your neighbors complain about? If you don't want to deal with puppy stuff why not get an older dog?

raingirl
November 14th, 2005, 09:09 AM
I beleive a "municipal" address means that if you are at 103A (A for the apartment) at 103 main street, that is a separate municipal address. It goes by address, not by building. The only reason I know this is because my parents are landlords and rent out houses. For legal purposes, they own 4 municiple addresses, because they live at one, and rent the other three, which are two basement apartments, and one upper floor apartment. It really has to go by address, not the building, or our apartment building would be way over limit! Wouldn't make sense.

Sorry...wanted to add something. It depends on the legality of the aparment you live in though. If you are just renting a room in the basement, but it's not legally considered a separate living space/apartment, the it would be 3 for the whole house.

kayla
November 14th, 2005, 09:14 AM
My mom is also a landlord who owns 4 apartments, all in one house. That's why I was asking you about addresses and electrical bills. You could probably get away with it. I just don't understand why you want a puppy when you don't seem to really want a puppy!:confused:

Beetlecat
November 14th, 2005, 10:03 AM
I'll try to answer all the questions..

How would I know it's seperate? Is there someone I could ask?

It's the same address, but I just add that I live in the basement suite. Then the packages come to my door at the back. I don't have a mailbox, simply 'cause I've never bothered putting one out. Most of my mail goes to another permanent address.

I don't pay a seperate electrical bill, a fixed amount is included with my rent. The folks upstairs pay the full bill but get a break on their rent.

They didn't really complain about it when I got my pup, they're just older and complain about everything. They have a little dog which they do not let play with my current dog. So they cannot be outside at the same time. I really consider it their problem and not mine (Ky would never hurt her) and I'm pretty sure the older lady is a little scared of Ky. But we hardly talk, so that's not really a problem either.

I would prefer an older dog since my reason for wanting another is for companionship for Ky and to exercise with us. I feel sorry sometimes for him being cooped up in the house with just me and a cat that despises him. We rarely go to parks (especially now with it being too cold and snowy) so he doesn't really have the chance to interact and play with other dogs.

I do not want to get a dog from a shelter because I do not: know why it's there, know where it came from, know how old it is, know what breed it is, know if it will actually act like the breed it might be, know if it was well xocilized as a puppy, if it was taken from it's parents too young, if it will get along with my dog... basically, I don't know anything about it. And I, unfortunatly, am quite particular when it come to the dog breed/personality type I want.

And heelers, on the whole, are quite rare around here. And I'd like to snatch one up while I have the chance. Or Ky will be an only dog for an indeterminate amount of time, and I'll continue to feel bad about it.

I got Ky as a puppy, though I would have prefered an adult dog there too, but now he's a well behaved, well trained adult, who is old enough to do adult things. And I do love looking at his puppy pictures. They grow up fast.. :party:

And if I can't keep the dog here for the first year or two of its life, well, we can at least share the last 10 years together..

Prin
November 14th, 2005, 12:12 PM
I have to say, if you have a submissive male, you have the biggest selection of dogos to choose from. Submissive males are the most flexible and the easiest to get along with. There aren't too many dogs who won't get along with a submissive male- old, young, male or female. Female is easiest, but with a submissive male, an older female might even do better than a younger one because the dominance issue would never come into question. If you get a dominant but smaller dog, you could have issues until she is bigger, if she does, indeed, get bigger than him.

An older female would know how to assert her dominance better and in a safer way.

You don't have to get from a shelter either. There are plenty of rescues who know more about their dogs than a shelter would.

PetFriendly
November 16th, 2005, 05:15 PM
How would I know it's seperate? Is there someone I could ask?

It's the same address, but I just add that I live in the basement suite. Then the packages come to my door at the back. I don't have a mailbox, simply 'cause I've never bothered putting one out. Most of my mail goes to another permanent address.

And if I can't keep the dog here for the first year or two of its life, well, we can at least share the last 10 years together..

Its a seperate unit if the walls the seperate are fire rated, you don't share any common spaces that aren't also fire rated and if a permit was issued to create the unit (if there wasn't a permit its the owners problem not yours.) It is my opinion that the dogs in the unit above will not count towards how many you can have.

If you're willing to wait a few years, why not find a heeler rescue and sign up there? As I understand it, they are very pretty dogs but can be 'too much' for most novice dog owners so you're likely to have a nice selection if you wait and if you explain to the rescue group what kind of personlaity traits you're looking for they'd be able to find you a good match. Its just a thought...

Beetlecat
November 16th, 2005, 07:03 PM
If you're willing to wait a few years, why not find a heeler rescue and sign up there?

Unfortunatly, there really isn't such a thing around here. I keep tabs on the local humane society and online such as petfinder, but I have never found anything I wanted there. And the breeds are usually a guess and the heeler phonotype is very strong so they could look like one but act completly different.

I could get one from a breeder but, again, there are none locally. None that I know of anyways. There are one or two backyard breeders around but I have no desire to get a dog from them.

And there are occationally heelers in the papers but, apart from them almost always being a cross (usually collie/heeler or australian shepherd/heeler) I don't know the owner's reasons for having puppies.

An oops litter out of working dogs I would accept, but not dogs that are let to breed contantly because the owner doesn't care to seperate them or who is breeding for profit.

PetFriendly
November 17th, 2005, 07:51 PM
If you put it that way. But I was thinking more along the lines of if you've found a potentially good litter now, you'll probably find one again? That said, if these people are willing to foster the dog on a long term basis for you it might be worth a try.

be careful, we've heard about arrangements like this going sour... I'd hate for you to invest so much emotion into this, all for naught.

mafiaprincess
November 17th, 2005, 08:22 PM
I'd say you have separate residences. And their dog limit doesn't count against yours. But the situation is sketchy about wanting to add to your family.. I wouldn't be leaving a dog uncrated even with a playmate. I'd be getting another crate. While good breeders will let you leave your dog with them within good reason. You might have to leave it a year for a well enough behaved one who's perfectly potty trained, and won't randomly chew stuff. Not sure any breeder would welcome a pup in for that long term.