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same day adoptions?

amber416
October 31st, 2005, 04:04 PM
For everyone involved in rescue, how do you feel about same day adoptions? Do any of you allow same day adoptions?

The rescue I work with has always had a policy against same day adoptions. However, over this past summer, pretty much all of the other rescues in our area, including the humane society, have started allowing same day adoptions (for cats). Now the board that heads my group is debating changing our policy to reflect the other groups' policy so that we are not making it more difficult to adopt from us versus the other local groups, and therefore have to take a big hit as far as our adoption success rate goes. I am in charge of the adoption events and i work closely with another woman who does the events i am unable to run. She strongly advocates same day adoptions.

The problem is, I don't, and I would be the one that would have to actually handle these adoptions. I am the one that would have to watch people i know nothing about (except what they have written on an adoption application that could be a bunch of lies for all i know) walk away with a cat whose well being and safety was in my hands. I don't think i could do that.

The people in my group that are for the same day adoptions say it is in the best interest of the cats. This way, they are not missing out on potential homes because our adoption procedure is more difficult than another group's. Also, we can move more cats through our system this way and ultimately save more.

I am a firm believer in quality over quantity, though. I admit that I have seen some rescues that are, in my opinion, way too picky with some of their adoption rules and therefore are probably missing out on some great homes. But when it comes to making sure we do not have a lot of impulse adoptions (which i think would happen if people could walk out of the store with the first cute one they see), not to mention seeing the environment the cat will be going to (as our policy stands now, we drop the cats off at their new home so we can do kind of a home check as well as see how they interact with the cat in their home), i think those are things that are not picky or too difficult but rather very important and something we owe to these cats.

Maybe i am just being too emotional,though.....what do you guys think?

Prin
October 31st, 2005, 04:09 PM
I'm not in rescue, but I have to say that when we got Jemma, we got her from a lady and we went to her house twice and she came to ours twice before handing Jemma over. With Boo, we went to the SPCA, picked him up and that was that. For the dog's sake, I prefer the heavy screening we got with Jemma than the same-day-never-see-you-again deal with Boo.

If we had been almost anybody else, we probably wouldn't have kept Boo. He cost us a small fortune in the first few months and kept us up throwing up every night. How many people who walk into the spca and walk out with a dog on a whim would have put up with that? I think waiting is a filter for the not serious, impulse buyers. JMO

Roxy's_MA
October 31st, 2005, 04:18 PM
I feel the process of getting an animal is so much more than just going out and getting one that day. If people are truly commited to an animal, I don't think they would mind the wait. If they can't wait one day, I would question how well thought out getting the pet was. I think this would also deter the people who decide to get a pet on a whim and prevent folks from making emotional decisions.

JMO

BMDLuver
October 31st, 2005, 04:31 PM
Jane Doe and John Smith walk in to an adoption event. Alongside of them they have Betty and Jimmy. What a beautiful, lovely looking family. Betty has been asking Mommy & Daddy for a kitten for a long time. Mommy and Daddy don't really want the kitten but anything little Betty wants she eventually gets. Jimmy doesn't really want a kitten, he wants a puppy. Little Betty picks out a cute little fluffy orange kitten. Jane and John fill out the application, pay the money and off they go. The kitten lasts a month with the family as the only one who was playing with it was Betty until she got scratched a few times then bitten. Jane hates cleaning the litter box, her curtains are getting shredded, her upholstery has claw marks all over it and John is getting tired of hearing about it. The kitten gets dumped at the local shelter as it's much simpler than admitting to a rescue that their perfect daughter Betty lost interest and that they never really wanted a kitten in the first place. They looked like the perfect family but everyone was so busy with all the people asking questions that they never got screened properly, visited in the home and talked to at length about the damage to a home, training and work involved in a kitten.

I'm not saying that this would happen every time but it happening just once would be very sad.. people who really want a pet will wade through the process to get one. It's not a pet store, it's an adoption event. It's not about volume it's about quality of adopters and return ratio. As you can see, I'm not an advocate for same day adoptions.

Beaglemom
October 31st, 2005, 04:36 PM
I think anyone who has given careful consideration to which pet to get and has done all the research that is necessary into getting one that fits with their lifestyle than what is another day or week or month? It takes a long time to do all that research so waiting is no big deal. Anyone who really wants a pet and is serious about it will wait for the right one. JMO.

jesse's mommy
October 31st, 2005, 05:35 PM
I think there should be a common medium found. I don't think same day is good, but I do think there should be some policy to research. I do however think some shelters are way too tough and here is my example. We were thinking of getting a dog or puppy, whichever one was the right match for us -- we were open to either, it was a matter of the perfect match to the family. We ended up falling in love with a puppy and she fell in love with us. My heart melted at the humane society when this puppy wouldn't stop kissing me. That was it! We left the application for them to research and told them (it was a Wednesday) that we would be back on Saturday. We went to our landlord to make sure we were permitted to have this dog, gave them $250 as an extra deposit, went to the store, bought a bed, food, treats, toys -- the whole lot. We didn't think it was going to be a problem because we both have always had dogs, knew the responsibility, were ready to take it -- through thick and thin, went through the motions to ensure we were permitted to have a pet ($250 says something), bought all this stuff, went back to the humane society and they told us they threw away our application without telling us because they don't adopt to people who rent because all renters are the same when they move out. I was astonished. In my heart I already let this puppy in as my family. I know I would die before I would allow anything happen to my pet. I would literally throw myself in front of danger before my pet would have to experience it, it's my child. So why would these people just put us in this category with everyone else? Why wouldn't they even call our references, our landlord, or visit the house? We were just stereotyped because we rent. Well I started crying right then or there and just could not stop. I had the bed setup in the car and had a collar and leash in my hand. Jim then stepped right up to the lady and said "Look we have gone through so much to make sure we can have a dog. We bought everything for it. We as a couple are strong and are willing and ready to take in a new family member. We will have a dog today even if we have to go to the pet store and buy a mill puppy for $1,000." Needless to say between Jim's rant and my crying they gave us Jesse and they couldn't have been more wrong to stereotype us like that. And we have been back there, giving them updates on Jesse, bringing pictures, finding donations to help them, and I also bring them cookies once in a while as a gift (I work for a cookie company) and you know, they never ONCE APOLOGIZED TO US!

I think some of them are a little too strict and there is some kind of happy medium, if both sides are willing to give and take a little.

BMDLuver
October 31st, 2005, 05:46 PM
For renters, we ask for a letter in writing from the landlord or a copy of the lease stating that they have permission to have a dog. That way everyone is sure it's ok and most landlords are surprising willing to do so.

jesse's mommy
October 31st, 2005, 05:58 PM
Actually, our landlord had no problem doing that. The Humane Society wanted nothing to do with us because we rent. I had the letter and the receipt for the deposit.

mastifflover
October 31st, 2005, 06:00 PM
I have to agree with you I do not like the idea of same day adoptions. You really do not know what people are like by meeting them once. The first rescue I got we spoke on the phone 3 or 4 times and they were in the Michigan. They did not do a home visit but did call my vet and one of the 3 references I gave them. It was not a done deal until we actually met. Which went well and I brought home my boy Jake who has since gone to the bridge. I think the scenario that was told is so true and if the rescue would have known more this kitty would not have been shuffled around like that. Yes there is the chance that you misjudge someone but I think it is better to err on the side of caution.

SOS MIOW
November 5th, 2005, 03:30 AM
We often do same-day adoptions at our adoption clinics. However, I personally attend these events and spend time talking with the potential adoptors to be sure that they know what they are getting into.

Last month we had a woman with 2 boys come in and each boy wanted a different kitten. I watched the woman talk with the 2 boys and decided that they would probably lose interest in the kitten within a very short time and Mom was not interested in being 'stuck' with litter box cleaning. She went on about the hamsters and guinea pigs that she had ended up 'stuck' with when the boys lost interest after a couple of months.

I spoke to the mother and suggested that they go home and think long and hard about the commitment of a kitten and to remember that the kitten would tear up the house (while young) and may grow up into a lazy, hissy adult .... we didn't hear back from her.

Did I talk them out of the idea? Probably. But I didn't feel they would last with a cat. Not when it is adopted for the children to have full responsibility for its care.

At the end of the day, we still had 6 adoptions!

A lot of adoptions are through our website and we send out applications and a lot of e-mails go back and forth as part of the interview process. I have even adopted out cats 'sight-unseen' to people who are more interested in a good companion animal rather than a particular colour or hair length. Once I know the family situation, I have had excellent success in matching the right cat with the home, as I am fully familiar with the temperament of each and every rescue we have for adoption.

I think everyone in Montreal knows the rescue that has over 1500 cats placed in foster homes and crammed into a duplex in town. I've heard it said that it is easier to adopt a child through Social Services than to adopt a cat from this particular rescue. ;)

CyberKitten
November 5th, 2005, 06:16 AM
I am not at all in favour of same day adoptions. I honestly think it is a great thing that is harder to adopt a cat or dog than a child - or so it is believed. I doubt it to be true, having some experience in dealing with social service agencies. Human adoptions done through the government route (as in a family applies to a social services department can take years for an infant and the competition is fierce (In NB, there were 11 infants placed!) and it takes months to adopt older children. The same is true in Nova Scotia. Private adoptions - which are legal though most people just assume the only route available in Canada is through regular govt channels - probably take less time but still require a complete home study. These are usually conducted between a young unmarried teenage women and her lawyer(s) and a doctor who has delivered the child and a familt s/he knows and their lawyer. I think the potential for problems in the second instance are greater if only because the birth mom knows immediately who the parents are and where they live. But most cases are most often done between parents who live some distance away to minimize contact unless of course there is a contract seeking it until the adoption is legally finalized. During the probationary period in both situations, home visits are regularly conducted.
There are fewer home visits in international adoptions (a friend recenly adopted a baby from China and went through red tape for five years!). Still, I have to disagree that it is easier to adopt a human baby than a furbaby.

If it were up to me, I would do the same thing as social service agencies and include a probationary period of adjustment. I realize many agencies do this but I think more should. A well adjusted "good" family will not mind a home visit and will in fact welcome it so they can show off their new baby in her surroundings. How does one verify references in one day? I suppose it is possible but if it like a questionnaire I filled in recently for another friend adopting a baby from China, it takes time just to fill that in! I would not make it that complicated but I think the issue of references needs to be certain. And forms for landlords and time to meet all the family members is essential. Think of the case recently raised on this forum where a poster wrote about her grandmother hated a cat that the family had adopted for her. Such an attitude would most likely have been picked up in a home setting and if not, would certainly have been noted in a home visit during a probationary period.

And yes, I realize this is volunteer work but we need to do the best for cats - or dogs or rabbits - or any furbaby in placing them. I even think this can be done at a distance. I myself have conducted home visits for some Siamese kitties now at happy forever homes in the Maritimes. And checked references by ensuring the references are also credible. (There are some silver linings to being one of the few people in youre field in a small area - you get to know most communities because sooner or later, you have a patient from that area).

So, I do not see how any of what I described is possible if you do a though home check. Of course, there will be some exceptions - a family that someone in your organization can vouch for. There are some ppl here I know more about in terms of how they feel about pets than some of the people I work with! I see the work they do with animals - it is online and quite evident they do a good job. I would adopt a cat in a heartbeat from several organizations here.

And that is the other side of the coin. Adopters also have to be cautious. There are unscrupulous organizations out there who do not do all the vetting they should or adopt kittens before they are 12 weeks old (unless of course they are bottle babies and there is a reason as to why they can leave before that usual age). And some people even pose as rescuers to make money when they are in fact backyard breeders so one should ideally visit a Rescue group and see how a cat/dog/bunny interact with other cats, how s/he was raised = all the things we would look for in a breeder. These animals need a second chance but that does not mean we should give them away more easily than a credible breeder would part with one of her babies after investing time, attention, excellent care and most of all live in the animal. If anything, Rescues need to more vigilant because these animals have been traumituzed enough already. They need to be sure they are going to a safe and happy home!

And that does not mean I would exclude adopters who are less well off or who are elderly or have special needs themselves. I have seen chained dogs in the best neighbourhoods - dogs who are status symbols just like the Mercedes or BMW oarked conspicuouly in the front of the house. The difference is dogs - and cats - are living beings who need love. I have seen a situation in my own neighbourhood where a lawyer and his family bought a beautiful dog but chained him in the back yard when their busy lives interupted,. It was a tragedy waiting to happen and it did when the family's next door neighbour was dogsitting a bichom and the chained large breed dog managed to get loose and attack the little pooch. The little dog's injuries were so severe he had to be euthenized and his owner was completely devisiated. He literally was her furbaby! The other dog - through no fault of hiw own really - was also put to sleep though I do think he might have been rehabilitated by someone with the time to help him. A family with fewer financial means but enough to care for him and to have a fund to cover vet bills would have been less likely to have been in this situation.

Sorry to be so long winded (It s my curse or maybe yours since you have tyo read my engthy missives, sigh!) In short, it is impossible to do good adoptions without home visits and referencing. That takes more than a day!! If one allows anyone to walk in off the streeet to adopt, you might as well set yourself up as a pet store selling to the first person who walks in the door with cash - and that is not what recuse is all about!

amber416
November 5th, 2005, 01:29 PM
Thanks a lot for your opinions, everyone.

SOS MIOW, that is what my group wants me to do. I run the adoption fairs and am in charge of all adoptions so they want me to be able to get a feel for people when they first come in and make my decisions based on that. I just can't do it...I don't trust my instincts well enough, nor can i get past the fact that without seeing their home, no matter how wonderful and animal-knowledgable they seem to be, they could be taking one of our cats that have already been through too much, home to a house filled with 30 other cats that are not taken care of properly. Too much Miami Animal Cops, maybe :) .

I have sent a lengthy letter to the board of my group, explaining my feelings on the subject and listing things that could be more likely to happen to our cats by skimping on our adoption procedure. I'm really hoping they feel the same way or will at least decide that our adoption success rate is fine without the policy change, otherwise i don't know what i will do...

Thanks again, everyone!

Prin
November 5th, 2005, 01:48 PM
Umm, maybe this is horrible, but I'd hint the animal they're looking at has some sort of medical condition and see what the people's reaction is. People who aren't likely to treat an animal well are also going to pick the healthiest, lowest maintenance one, you know? You can always say the tests were negative later... :evil: :o

Lucky Rescue
November 5th, 2005, 03:03 PM
run the adoption fairs and am in charge of all adoptions so they want me to be able to get a feel for people when they first come in and make my decisions based on that. I just can't do it.

You can get an amazing amount of information from people with just casual-seeming conversation. People don't even know they're being interviewed so will reveal a lot.

Example:

Prospective adopter: "Oh, what a cute cat. I'm looking for one."

Me: That's great! Do you have other cats?

P.A: "I did have one (or 2 or whatever) but I lost him.

Me: Oh how sad!! I'm sorry! What happened?

P.A. "Well, I moved (had a baby/got a dog/got new furniture) so had to give them to the SPCA".

OR it was an intact male spraying OR an intact female who "keeps having kittens" OR if someone in the home is allergic, but they want to "try out" another one OR they want a guarantee the cat won't claw their new sofa or ever miss the litter box OR if they want a kitten "for the kids"....etc.

(one idiot wanted a kitten for her husky to play with, since the husky was "too rough" with her other dog!!!!!) :eek:

'Nuff said.;) Next!

Their demeanor says a lot too. If someone stands there eyeing the cat as though judging how many miles it has on it, or if it's a good investment - no way. Same if they try to beat you down on the adoption fee. If they don't want to pay this minimal amount for a spayed/neutered healthy cat, what happens if the cat gets sick?

Other people don't even ask the adoption fee, smile, hold out their arms and can't wait to have the kitty put into them.:)

CyberKitten
November 5th, 2005, 03:24 PM
I agree that you can tell alot from interviewing and there are many questions that elicit info the prospective adopter may not realize s/he is providing. But that does not solve the home situation - the references. Psychopaths are expert liars and bouchers who bring children with them to the free to a good home ads come to mind here.

Lucky Rescue
November 5th, 2005, 06:47 PM
References have their place I guess, but depends on who is giving them.

Many people swear by vet refences, but I do not. For example, I have neighbours whose dog LIVES in a cage in the garage. This dog has never walked on grass, run, played or chased a ball. Ever.

Yet I'm sure it's up to date with shots, neutered, etc. So any rescue who gave these people a dog based on vet references were condemning the dog to a life not worth living.:(

badger
November 5th, 2005, 07:30 PM
I guess if your neighbour's dog got kidnapped, they'd know it was you :)

free
November 5th, 2005, 08:35 PM
last month we went into toronto animal control to adopt our airedale. i knew to bring our other dog to meet him. within the hour we had met beau filled out the application and left with him. no interview nothing. if we had not had an airedale before and did not know what we would be getting into it could have been a disaster. i would have thought they would have done their investigation about us so they would know that we were the right family for him. who knows what would have happened to our beau if some with know experience adopted him.

SOS MIOW
November 7th, 2005, 12:10 AM
If we had the time, personnel, and resources, we could do all the things CK has been saying ..... however, we do not. I, personally, am a good 'people person' and of the 200+ cats we have placed in the past 18 months, we have only had 5 or 6 'returns'. Most returns were because of an unforeseen allergy popping up, or during the trial period, it was found that the cat could not adapt well to the family situation.

We give a one-week 'trial' period, particuarly in the case of the adoptor having another cat at home. We want to make sure that there is not going to be any major problems with the entrance of a second cat into the family.

We do the best we can with the resources we have. All of our cats are properly vetted, vaccinated, and operated before adoption, unless they are young kittens (8-10 weeks old), in which case we make the appointment for sterilization when the kitten is 18-20 weeks old.

I know there are vets who sterilize at 2 lbs (2 months old), but one of our vets (over 40 years in the business) feels it can harm the development of the cat (like doing a hysterectomy on an 8-year old child).

Most people who adopt from our clinics are not going to throw away $120 on a 'whim'. The ones who need to be looked out for are the ones who (like CK said) try to bargain or are looking for a freebie. They are the ones who will dump the little cat at the first sign of sickness rather than pay vet costs for treatments.

SOS MIOW
November 7th, 2005, 12:12 AM
last month we went into toronto animal control to adopt our airedale. i knew to bring our other dog to meet him. within the hour we had met beau filled out the application and left with him. no interview nothing.

Few Animal Control Agencies/SPCA's have the time or the personnel to do any type of screening. They do the best they can with the resources they have and the huge amount of animals that pass through their doors.

Lil'RickyMom
November 8th, 2005, 03:21 PM
I didn't read all the posts because I've got work to do, but I wanted to give my two cents. I've been rescuing for 12 years, and NEVER do I have same day adoption. I don't go to adoption day events, as I believe any potential family should be screened before walking away with a pet. I do realize that for each dog there is at least 15 cats looking for homes, but I still believe serious people will wait for the screening process to be done with.

I've had people find it too complicated, or too long, well they can go save a dog from another shelter. I won't take the chance of placing a dog that might get dumped. Rather lose one good home and find another one, than take the risk that it wasn't a good home....

That was for my 2 cents worth....

SarahLynn123
November 8th, 2005, 05:03 PM
I dont agree with same day adoptions, but I dont agree with how it was done when we wanted Shadow. They dont do same day adoptions, fine. But you can only put a dog on hold for 24 hours. So we drive in rush hour friday right after work for 2 hours, get there right in just in time, meet Shadow, take her for a quick walk and meet our other dog Belle. Go home, come back saturday morning right when they open, fill out the paper work, asked us some questions, payed the money and brought home Shadow. We wanted her as early as possible so I could spend as much time as possible before going back to work. (we would have rather taken her home friday)

Why wait the night? they had no paper work on us, asked us no questions until we came back. I realize its probably because some people dont come back the next day, and its a pre-screening process of its own but I kept in contact with them all week because we couldn't get there any earlier then friday and I wanted to make sure she hadn't been adopted by someone else.

Thats all behind us now, Shadow has been with us for 7 months now!

Oh yes and they told us friday that she has medical issues and we had no problem with that. (She is all better now)

doggy lover
November 8th, 2005, 08:50 PM
I adopted a kitten years ago from the Scarb. animal control, I just walked in and picked her out. No questions asked really, they gave me a voucher for money off of her spay and that was it. It might be different now a days as that was quite a few years ago, she lived until she was 7 and was pts due to kidney and liver problems. When I think about it I can see why you guys are more interested in where your animals go, I could have been anyone and to them it didn't matter.

SOS MIOW
November 9th, 2005, 10:27 PM
I do realize that for each dog there is at least 15 cats looking for homes, but I still believe serious people will wait for the screening process to be done with.


Now, before everyone jumps all over me ..... I agree that home screening is important for dogs; however, a lot of people who want cats can just open their door and "poof", there's a stray, or go down the street and pick a kitten from a litter that a neighbor's cat had.

Just to get people to pay $$$ (over $100) for a cat can be a very big deal (why pay, they say, when you can get them for free all over the place). We feel that those who are willing to fork over $$$ are most likely (a) cat lovers, and (b) willing to make the commitment.

If we had to do lengthy screening and home visits, we would not have been able to place as many cats as we have, OR, we would end up with over 1500 cats like another Montreal rescue has (who does do very strict screening).

Again .... we do the best we can with the resources we have.

PS: I know other groups on this board do same-day adoptions. Am I the only one brave enough to risk the wrath by admitting to it????:confused:

lm9012
December 4th, 2005, 02:41 PM
Unlike many of you, I didn't have tons of experience with dogs before I decided to adopt. We wanted a Jack Russell Terrier, but knew nothing about the breed. I did some research online and discovered what we could possibly get into...they require tons of attention, can be super active, etc. But that's what he wanted, we weren't too big on a puppy, since we knew there were many grown dogs out there that needed a home. We started with petfinder and made some appointments with different rescues. We ended up looking at 3 JRT's. Some were a 2 hour drive away, all were with fosters, so we had to meet with an agency rep, as well as the foster parents, and were told they'd want to see our home first as well. So no same-day adoptions here. We liked the idea of being able to meet the pup before hand, and also meet with someone who has been caring for them and knew their personality, fave treats, routine etc. We soon realized a JRT wasn't necessarily a good fit for our personalities and lifestyle. Luckily we were among several couples looking to adopt those 3 guys we looked at so we are sure they went to a good home regargless.
We decided to check out the anti cruelty society here in Chicago one Saturday morning. We'd assume we were still several weeks away from actually owning a pet. We walked around the pound, and eyed a JRT, snuggled up and not really paying much attention to people looking at him. While all the other dogs showed their eagerness, we were drawn to this little pup. We took him outside and just loved him immediately. He had such a calm demeanor, acted very non chalant towards some kids that were there, and didn't flinch as other dogs were jumping and barking at him. We waited patiently for about 4 1/2 hours in the waiting room during the adoption process. We weren't really 'interviewed'. We knew our landlord would be ok with us having him, but we didn't have our lease or anything else in writing. THey said they'd have to contact him. Of course he wasn't home! So we were told we'd have to stay there until closing time to ensure that no one else could adopt him, then get a written letter or have our landlord call the center himself to OK it. We could take him home the next day. About 15 minutes later, they came back and told us to just go ahead and take him--without the standard landlord ok. We paid $50 and were given a bag of food. HE'd just been altered, had his rabies and distemper shots, they didn't know too much about him, since he'd only been there about a week, they didn't even know his age!
It has been almost two months and we adore our little guy. Everyday we learn something new..he did have a few problems, had a cold, ear infection, eye infection, has a little dental disease and a heart murmur. But he is ours.
So in this case, Albert came to a good home with a couple who was willing and able to take care of him. We get the handsome look of a JRT, but he is the sweetest lap dog! We are his world and he is ours. He loves to cuddle and kiss. Due to his heart condition, he can't be too active, so a few minutes of play a day and a few short walks do it for him.
Now for us, after investing several weeks and car mileage searching for a good pet...(always with the understanding that we don't get to pick them, they pick us!) we were very happy with the outcome. A place like the ASPCA probably has to allow same day adoptions due to the numbers of animals they get in. True, they judged us on our demeanor only, no questions about our home situation was asked. True, anyone could've come in and taken Albert. By their first vet visit they woud've learned that he's a lot older than he looks, and had all the problems I'd mentioned above. Albert was on antibiotics and other medication the first month we had him. It seemed every weekend we had to take him to the vet.
Now he has a clean bill of health! So for us, it worked out. But I'd hate to think what someone without our commitment level would've done. :confused:

lm9012
December 4th, 2005, 02:49 PM
Unlike many of you, I didn't have tons of experience with dogs before I decided to adopt. We wanted a Jack Russell Terrier, but knew nothing about the breed. I did some research online and discovered what we could possibly get into...they require tons of attention, can be super active, etc. But that's what he wanted, we weren't too big on a puppy, since we knew there were many grown dogs out there that needed a home. We started with petfinder and made some appointments with different rescues. We ended up looking at 3 JRT's. Some were a 2 hour drive away, all were with fosters, so we had to meet with an agency rep, as well as the foster parents, and were told they'd want to see our home first as well. So no same-day adoptions here. We liked the idea of being able to meet the pup before hand, and also meet with someone who has been caring for them and knew their personality, fave treats, routine etc. We soon realized a JRT wasn't necessarily a good fit for our personalities and lifestyle. Luckily we were among several couples looking to adopt those 3 guys we looked at so we are sure they went to a good home regargless.
We decided to check out the anti cruelty society here in Chicago one Saturday morning. We'd assume we were still several weeks away from actually owning a pet. We walked around the pound, and eyed a JRT, snuggled up and not really paying much attention to people looking at him. While all the other dogs showed their eagerness, we were drawn to this little pup. We took him outside and just loved him immediately. He had such a calm demeanor, acted very non chalant towards some kids that were there, and didn't flinch as other dogs were jumping and barking at him. We waited patiently for about 4 1/2 hours in the waiting room during the adoption process. We weren't really 'interviewed'. We knew our landlord would be ok with us having him, but we didn't have our lease or anything else in writing. THey said they'd have to contact him. Of course he wasn't home! So we were told we'd have to stay there until closing time to ensure that no one else could adopt him, then get a written letter or have our landlord call the center himself to OK it. We could take him home the next day. About 15 minutes later, they came back and told us to just go ahead and take him--without the standard landlord ok. We paid $50 and were given a bag of food. HE'd just been altered, had his rabies and distemper shots, they didn't know too much about him, since he'd only been there about a week, they didn't even know his age!
It has been almost two months and we adore our little guy. Everyday we learn something new..he did have a few problems, had a cold, ear infection, eye infection, has a little dental disease and a heart murmur. But he is ours.
So in this case, Albert came to a good home with a couple who was willing and able to take care of him. We get the handsome look of a JRT, but he is the sweetest lap dog! We are his world and he is ours. He loves to cuddle and kiss. Due to his heart condition, he can't be too active, so a few minutes of play a day and a few short walks do it for him.
Now for us, after investing several weeks and car mileage searching for a good pet...(always with the understanding that we don't get to pick them, they pick us!) we were very happy with the outcome. A place like the ASPCA probably has to allow same day adoptions due to the numbers of animals they get in. True, they judged us on our demeanor only, no questions about our home situation was asked. True, anyone could've come in and taken Albert. By their first vet visit they woud've learned that he's a lot older than he looks, and had all the problems I'd mentioned above. Albert was on antibiotics and other medication the first month we had him. It seemed every weekend we had to take him to the vet.
Now he has a clean bill of health! So for us, it worked out. But I'd hate to think what someone without our commitment level would've done. :confused:

Lucky Rescue
December 4th, 2005, 07:33 PM
Adopting out dogs is harder than for cats, and yes - we do same-day adoptions for cats.

The adopters usually live close to our events, and I have taken the cat and followed the person with it after the contract and fee are out of the way and can do the homecheck right away.

We question people quite closely before doing the adoption - people reveal an amazing amount of info in seemingly casual conversation - and will not adopt to one person in the home if the others living there do not come and also agree they want the pet.

Anyone haggling over the fee also doesn't get a cat nor do people wanting to declaw OR asking for a guarantee the cat won't scratch their expensive furniture. Anyone with unruly kids who allow them to pound on the cage doors is also denied, as is anyone who has ever dumped a pet at the shelter or kept intact animals and allowed them to reproduce.

People who think they can get a free cat elsewhere obviously aren't planning on having it spayed/neutered, or vetted since the cost of this is much more than our adoption fee.

We also do not adopt single kittens to anyone who works all day and has no other cats.

A few days after the adoption, we call to check in, then go visit after that. If any of the terms of the contract are being broken, we take the cat back.

If we did a Dun & Bradstreet on everyone wanting a cat, we would soon be in serious trouble. Someone might be willing to wait quite awhile for a rare breed cat or dog, but not for a 4 year old tabby.

Every cat is as important to us as our own personal pets. We do the best we can, and have had VERY few problems. We try and match the cat to the household and disclose everything about the animal so there are no surprises.

We do NOT believe that "any home is better than none" and do all we can to ensure that animal's life will be better in the new home and not worse!

Even if a new home doesn't work out, as it did not with my Stinkerbell, it's all for the best since it seemed fated for her to stay with me and I'm so glad she did!!

Prin
December 4th, 2005, 09:31 PM
We do NOT believe that "any home is better than none" and do all we can to ensure that animal's life will be better in the new home and not worse!
I think you have to ask yourself, "Is my home the best one this dog could ever get? Am I the best owner this dog could have?" and then you might begin to maybe get closer to being the home the doggy (or kitty) deserves.:)

Lucky Rescue
December 4th, 2005, 10:53 PM
"Is my home the best one this dog could ever get?

Of course MY home is the best!!:p

Actually, the hardest part is trusting anyone else to treat the pet the way YOU do!!

Puppyluv
December 5th, 2005, 10:46 PM
Arrrrgggh I'm really frustrated with my friend right now:mad: She went with me to the vet yesterday for Layla, and while we were there, we saw some kittens up for adoption. They were really cute, yada yada, we played with them a little bit while we were waiting. Then, while I was in the back room, holding Layla to be put under, my friend went to the counter and tried to "adopt" one right then and there. Fortunately, the receptionist said she couldn't, since my friend didn't have a crate or anything. So my friend says "but if I have to wait until tomorrow, then I'll probably be too lazy to come back" (WTH?!?!? ARRGGGHHH AND I CALL THIS CRAZY LUNATIC MY FRIEND?!?!?!) The receptionist, gave her this look, and told her no, sorry, not going to happen. (Thank god, is what I was thinking) So I was talking to my friend, saying, "you know, maybe you should think about this a little longer than 15 minutes" and she says "you got Layla on a spur of the moment" (which is wrong, and I clear this up with her, I actually spent months finding a dog, and then once I made contact over Layla, spent another month working things out, making sure everything would be perfect)
So we went home last night, me with my saddened dog, her without a cat. I got a call from her about 20 minutes ago. She went to a pet store, bought a cage, and then called the vet to see if it was the same receptionist. It wasn't, so she went to the vet, and well... now she has a cat. I'm sure she'll give this cat some love for a little while. But she doesn't have a great track record with animals.. she had a dog last year and had to send it to her parents after 6 months.:mad:
So in the long run, my oppinion on same-day adoptions? :evil:

Prin
December 5th, 2005, 11:01 PM
Never talk about animals with friends you intend to keep...JMO

mesaana
December 5th, 2005, 11:30 PM
Prin, that is sooo true!

I almost got in a serious argument with a good friend this week-end... He thought he was being funny telling me that he was thinking about getting a dog for a surprise Christmas present to his parents... Oh boy! My other friend actually got up and out of the line of fire!!!

Lyne

twinmommy
December 5th, 2005, 11:36 PM
Well said Prin.

I cannot talk to very many friends about ANYTHING in re to animals. I've given up, somewhat. If it's not the crappy food they see nothing wrong with, it's the lack of vet care --spay/neuter arguments, (i know!!) and don't even get me started on the whole "Christmas gift" thing!!!! Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.:evil:

SOS MIOW
December 6th, 2005, 10:55 AM
We try and match the cat to the household and disclose everything about the animal so there are no surprises.

I believe this is the key to adopting ..... matching the kitty with the family situation and lifestyle of the adoptor.

We also do follow-ups (by phone) and receive numerous letters and e-mails from our adopters about how wonderfully their new family member is doing.

Most people who come to our adoption clinics have seen the ad in local papers and have already made the decision to adopt (I have never had a 'walk-in' who spontaneously decided to adopt). We also get a lot of calls before our adoption clinics and screen by phone before the adopter comes to the clinic. When they get there, they already have a cat in mind based on our phone conversation.

I am not going to say that each and every adoption has been a 100% success - we have had 4 or 5 'returns' over the past year and a half (often due to unforeseen allergies).

However, I am dealing with one adopter from a year ago who wants to give the cat back because she and her husband bought a new house, "bought" a large breed dog, and kitty has started peeing all over the place. This has all happened in the past month!!!! I told the woman that the kitty is reacting to the changes and is obviously upset about the dog. I told her that the cat needs a 'safe' room of her own where she can use her box without worrying about doggie sticking his nose in while she is peeing and to give the little darling a bit more time to adjust to all the newness around her.

Most certainly we will take the cat back if these suggestions don't work out. Poor baby - she's not quite 2 yet and may undergo another stressful upheaval in her life ....

Here's a picture of the little love ....