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Cat with Kidney disease

kittiwake
October 27th, 2005, 04:06 PM
I have a 17 yr old cat who has borderline kidney failure & she is suppose to eat KD or a low protein diet. I am looking for suggestions of an alternative to KD or some basic facts to help me feed her as best I can. She eats but doesn't like the KD at all. I try mixing it into her other food & that works for a day but if she can avoid it she will. I also feed her dry cat food. Is there a food I can get that is lower in protein that she might eat? I understand it needs to smell like food to her & the KD just doesn't. She will eat boiled chicken, hamburger, sardines, tuna, salmon & most of the brand name cat foods just not kidney food. Altho she is thin, she doesn't seem sick. She did have a cold about a month ago & I was told by the vet that she could use some fluids when she gets stressed so I took her in for that. She is about 5% dehydrated. Her blood work shows that she is about 1 pt. off so she's not really seriously compromised as yet if I understand it. I would like to keep her as healthy & happy as I can for as long as I can. I would very much welcome some tips & info. Thank you.

CyberKitten
October 27th, 2005, 04:18 PM
I have been trying to figure out what KD is (and I thought I knew most foods and brand names). Wellness has some good stuff made for elderly cats. As does Royal Canin and Felidae. The chicken and rice at one of our Health Food stores - and I forget the name - works for some ill kitties. It's in a small tin and is expensive (1.99 for a tiny tin). You might ask your vet what s/he recommends?

shannonRN
October 27th, 2005, 04:42 PM
KD=kidney diet, I think; not a brand. I would suggest trying a different variety. Please try this link, I really think it will be helpful: http://www.felinecrf.com/managd.htm

Just something else I came across---From http://www.2ndchance.info/homemadediets.htm--I have no idea how credible this source is, but they're some ideas maybe you could ask your vet about. Some vets are much more educated about nutrition than others, by the way.
"A diet suitable for dogs and cats with failing kidneys can be prepared at home by adding one-half cup of cooked ground chicken breast or two crushed large hard-boiled eggs (no shells) to four cups of mashed potatoes or four cups of boiled brown rice. 30ml (Two tablespoons) of Canola oil, one-quarter Centrum tablet, 100iu of vitamin E, and 500mg of absorbable Calcium from any human calcium supplement, which is free of phosphorus on the label. As with all home-prepared diets, the addition of a taurine tablet and the vitamin E from a drug store is advisable in cats of all kinds. Taurine deficiencies can lead to heart problems. Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol acetate is known to slow the aging process by scavenging free-radicals). Garlic or onion powder can be used in moderation if the diet is fed to dogs. It must never be fed to cats. The amount prepared should feed a ten pound cat for two to three days, or a 25 pound dog for a day or two, depending on its activity level and metabolic rate.***
A second recipe, originally published by Hillís Pet Foods, for renal failure in dogs but somewhat modified by me, consisted of ľ pound ground regular beef (not chuck or round), 1 large hard-boiled egg, two cups of cooked white rice, three slices of white bread, and a teaspoon full of calcium carbonate. I would add a multivitamin with vitamin E to this recipe.
A second recipe, originally published by Hillís Pet Foods, for renal failure in cats but somewhat modified by me, consists of one quarter pound of lightly cooked liver (retaining the fat or adding two tablespoons full, if none is present) two large hard-boiled eggs, one teaspoon-full of calcium carbonate, one tablespoon full of canola oil, and one quarter teaspoon full of Mortonís Nu-Salt (salt substitute). I would add a multivitamin with vitamin E to this recipe.
In any of the renal diets, the addition of fermentable fiber may be helpful in controlling uremia. The theory is that the bacteria that ferment this fiber in the intestines utilize some of the excess urea in the petís blood stream."

Good luck--above all else, kitty has to eat--so keep trying and keep in touch with your vet.

Lucky Rescue
October 27th, 2005, 06:05 PM
I've never had an animal who would eat any of those prescription diets. They're pretty revolting.

I would think senior canned cat food would be good, since it's much lower in protein and has a very high water content.

kittiwake
October 28th, 2005, 10:00 AM
Thank you SO much, I will followup on all info and I very much appreciate your time & interest! If I learn anything I will bring it back here to share as I assume there are others facing these same issues.

mycat
October 29th, 2005, 02:59 AM
"A second recipe, originally published by Hillís Pet Foods, for renal failure in cats but somewhat modified by me, consists of one quarter pound of lightly cooked liver (retaining the fat or adding two tablespoons full, if none is present) two large hard-boiled eggs, one teaspoon-full of calcium carbonate, one tablespoon full of canola oil, and one quarter teaspoon full of Mortonís Nu-Salt (salt substitute). I would add a multivitamin with vitamin E to this recipe.
In any of the renal diets, the addition of fermentable fiber may be helpful in controlling uremia. The theory is that the bacteria that ferment this fiber in the intestines utilize some of the excess urea in the petís blood stream."
.

What's if the pet does not want to eat this ?