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Transfer Factor Plus question

mycat
October 20th, 2005, 11:27 PM
It seems there are many praises on internet about Transfer Factor Plus (I only know it after reading justncase !), like boosting immune system, treat/stop cancer, ...

Is there anybody in this forum actually used it ? Please share your experience.

Thanks.

mycat
October 22nd, 2005, 12:29 PM
My goodness. Nobody uses it at all ???

So why there are so many hypes on the web about results of this drug on pets ?

Like this one http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/tf/s/pets.htm

CyberKitten
October 22nd, 2005, 02:33 PM
It has never been effectively studied - one of those products that you use at your own risk. I would not touch it unless I knew more about it and for me that means that it is proven clinically - with several OBJECTIVE peer reviewed studies. Just like I am not keen about drugs that are heralded as the great wonder with studies paid for the pharmacutical industry (vioxx and celebrex comes to mind), substances not subject to tough questions and objective reviews should not be used until they have been through that process. This is a so called "natural" product so under Cdn and US law, it is subject to few regulations.

Thus, if you give it your pet and something happens, almost no one in the health care system (in the case of pets, vets) will be able to figure out what happened and how to fix it. It really is at your own risk!

As an oncologist, I would be jumping for joy if someone - anyone, I would not care if they were a radical hermit who did not trust the medical establishment - managed to develop a product that "stopped" cancer. Unfortunatelely, despite some claims by various marginal groups, there is no such product, this one included that can nake this claim.

Certainly it is true that certain foods can help prevent cancer and some new medications - the new tumour dissolving meds under study currently - that show promise, but no one can say they have a product that "stops" cancer. Those claims always terrify me because I fear some trusting soul will use the product and hope it will work. It's one thing if the product is harmless (there is no evidence that this one is) though that still means dashed hopes in desperate situations. It's quite another if it is not harmless.

Anectotal info is just that - it means nothing other than one person has experienced or claims to have experienced some benefit from a product. You have to ask yourself who they are, why they are making the claim, and most importantly, how valid is it? There have always been these kind of prouducts - like laitrille - that actually caused more problems - but now with the internet, even more have proloferated, sigh!!

mycat
October 22nd, 2005, 10:29 PM
Thanks CBK ! You are right. Maybe the people quoted in the link is not unbiased.

What confuses me is whenever the pet having problem, people always say "go to the vet" which implies your vet is kind of authority people, don't try anything without asking them first.

The link has quotes from all kinds of authority people, like DVMs, PhDs, MDs. So the question comes to mind is 1) Are they real (who has time to check each of these quotes ?) 2) If they're real, then don't always trust them 100%, which is contrary to what I, and probably many others, used to believe, which is "don't try it without asking the vet (DVM) first" !

I know that it's normal to have 2 experts to disagree with each other (remember OJ Simpson case ?). But if the experts (assume to know very well in their own expertise) disagree, then how can a normal people, like us, without any specific training/knowledge, know (and then decide) ?

Puppyluv
October 22nd, 2005, 11:04 PM
The link has quotes from all kinds of authority people, like DVMs, PhDs, MDs. So the question comes to mind is 1) Are they real (who has time to check each of these quotes ?) 2) If they're real, then don't always trust them 100%, which is contrary to what I, and probably many others, used to believe, which is "don't try it without asking the vet (DVM) first" !


Think about those "miracle weight-loss cures" that are in magazines and on late night tv. They all have "authority people" touting how well they work... but do they? No. Dr. Joe Meisenphesher PhD, MD, DDS, DVM, etc etc (yes I made that up) may say that it works, but if Dr Meisenphesher is being payed a couple million for these "testimonials" what does it really mean?
Also, when there are testimonials by "satisfied users", whos to say they really are? I could write a letter saying how much I love product X, and how much it helped me, even if I've never tried it.
Just some things to think about before trusting the plethora of info on the internet

CyberKitten
October 23rd, 2005, 12:40 PM
You can always verify whether someone has the qualifications they claim. People can buy a doctorate from some fly by night school and there even are offshore places that offer medical degrees so it's always good to ask where someone obtained their degree. And if they have an MD, are they Board certified in their specialty. The days of the old time family physician do not exist any more - when someone could graduate from medical school and hang up a shingle and start practiciing. Now even family physicians have to do a residency in family medicine - and admittedly it's not a big draw. The Univ of Sask a couple yrs ago had zero applicants for its family medicine program!! But I digress!!!

Just because someone has a PhD does not mean it is relevant to what they are doing - look at Dr. Phil (who I have admittedly never watched tho I know who he is). I was surprised to discover his PhD is in some obscure subject not even closely related to counselling or psychology. He does not hide that fact tho - just uses the title as a kind of marketing thing.

Of greater concern is someone with a PhD in say philosophy who claims to be a scientific expert. Or one who graduated from an unaccredited school offshore ot by mailorder!!

There are occasionally mavericks who are true believers in a cause and back it up. Dr. Atkins comes to mind, lol Or Linus Pauling who did win two Nobel prizes and made claims about vitamin C and the common cold - but he could back them up with a PhD in chemistry and more importantly, peer reviewed properly done research!