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cat's possible cancer.... dealing with the more philosophical questions....

milo's mama
October 17th, 2005, 01:20 PM
our beloved cat is slowly dying before our eyes. she is only 12 years old and we fully expected this crazy cat to be living out her much deserved golden years of retirement. sadly, that is not going to happen for her and we are just starting to go through this process. we have most of our medical questions answered (as well as they can be) and so now we are mainly saddled with those nagging philosophical questions about how to move forward. we are trying desperately to keep ourselves and our needs out of the decision making, but i'm sure as all of you know, it is extremely difficult. i feel like i do not have anyone to speak with on this level, and i'm hoping that at least some of you are out there to listen, if not give some suggestions.

her story is one of those typically heard, she was great one day and then bam, here we are at the vet. we found her huddled up under the bed and she was not interested at all when we went throught the nightly ritual of the wet food can opening. this was our first sign something was wrong, as this kitty is more of the food where's food give me food i want food type of kitty. when we finally coaxed her out, we saw the horrible labored breathing and finally saw (why didn't we notice this earlier?) her horrible weight loss.

the next morning we took her to the vet. our normally 15-16lb kitty was down to a measly 11lbs. the immediate concern, of course was the breathing. xrays showed fluid in the chest cavity so they did a chest tap and took out 1/2 cup of fluid on the right side. the left side was less accessible. so it was not possible to really say whether or not the mass showing in the xray was the fluid or tumors. sigh. they ran the battery of diagnostic tests to try to rule out diagnosis. bloodwork and fluid analysis were fine. so no thryoid problems here. next step was the sonogram. thankfully she showed absolutely no signs of heart disease. but all that meant was that the mass on the lungs were probably cancer. our vet said that the locations of the mass were in such a position to make a FNA biopsy not possible. and considering her weakened state, an endoscopic would be highly stressful. basically, they could only tell us with confidence it was cancer. but of course, without a biopsy you cannot confirm this. the prognosis was 4-6 weeks and we went home with some prednisone and antiobotics.

we made an appt with an oncologist (which is not for a couple of days). when i ask myself why? i think mainly, just to see whether or not she can perform a FNA to confirm the type and phase of cancer. then we will move forward with the decision about treatment. because i know that without a biopsy, chemotherapy is not possible and so basically i feel that our options are not truly choices at all. without treatment she will surely die by next month.

at the same time, i know that even with treatment, she is going to die. and considering that the onset of clinical symptoms usually mean the cancer is severe and not as successfully responsive, this is clearly a sooner rather than later reality.

however, we are definitely not at the point of death right now. despite her obvious decline (breathing, weight, energy, etc) she is definitely still alert and with us in every other sense of meaning and experience.

so with her not at the point of unnecessary suffering, i feel like i would be doing her an injustice if i didn't take her to to the oncologist to gain a confirmation. for me, it's simple... cancer = oncologist.

however, a confirmation for what? is it for me, so i can feel better putting her to rest? is it so that we can move forward with chemotherapy even though i know that her weakened state makes her a poor candidate? is it so that i can look her in her sweet face and believe that i tried "everything possible"? is it for that possible but improbable, but if we don't try we'll never know, chance of a successful treatment?

go to an oncologist with some hope? (again, hope for what?) or let her die out her final weeks?

i know these are all very personal questions that no one (not even the oncologist) can give us the right answer. but i am hoping that some of you might understand that it is not just the test results that give us pause in these situations. and i am hoping maybe some of you also grapped with these very same questions and could share your story. i am constantly second guessing myself, which is almost killing me as much as seeing her so sick.

BMDLuver
October 17th, 2005, 01:35 PM
This is an extremely difficult time for you and your family. I went through this 2 years ago with my beloved dog of 14 years Selena. She was great, doing wonderful.. then in a matter of a week, we noticed she was losing weight and becoming less inclined to eat. I took her to the vet's as it must just be something simple and they'll fix it. When she had a thorough exam and some tests.. they indicated that she was in very advanced stages of cancer. I asked myself, why didn't I notice before... how could I have missed this? I discussed at length with their Hollistic vet who also specializes in cancer therapy... what I could do to keep her going, to make her better for a bit? There were many options but all of them pointed to continual decline with minimal comfort to her. I made a decision that she had given my family and myself 14 wonderful years of love and devotion and that she did not need to leave this world with any additional pain or endeavours on my part to keep her going for a bit longer. It was one of the worst days of my life and I still think back on it with tears and play the "what if I had noticed sooner" game. As you said, this is an extremely personal decision but I just wanted to share with you my experience.

Roxy's_MA
October 17th, 2005, 01:49 PM
Although I have never been through this I can only imagine how hard it must be. :grouphug:

Below is a link to a website, that has lots of info on dealing with cancer in pets. Specifically the Education, Reasearch, and Loss support links

http://www.kaliswish.com/

Lucky Rescue
October 17th, 2005, 01:56 PM
Of all the decisions we have to make concerning our pets, this is the hardest one.

I've done it many times, but rarely with complete confidence of doing the right thing. You have to weigh the pros and cons. Is further testing going to benefit your cat in any way, or just increase or prolong her suffering or discomfort?

She is 12 and has lost nearly a third of her body weight. Only your vet can tell you if she's strong enough to endure tests or treatments, if treatment will have benefit, or even if it's worth putting her through more trauma.

My criteria for ending my pets' lives was:
Are they pain free?
Do they enjoy anything - eating, playing or cuddling?
Are they still interested in what's going on around them?
Is there any hope for recovery?

When the answer to all these questions was "no", then I knew it was time, even though I wanted them to stay longer and not leave me.

Please do not blame yourself. Cats are masters of disguising illness or infirmity and often by the time we notice anything, it's too late.

milo's mama
October 17th, 2005, 02:08 PM
thank you to all so far, for reading my story (i didn't realize how long that was!) and for your kind words.

we're going tonight for another chest tap. and i will maybe talk with the vet. she is very competent, but very matter of fact.... which i know is good but sometimes i have a hard time processing my questions/concerns with her.

thank you everyone. i can't believe how incredibly hard this all is...

Prin
October 17th, 2005, 02:29 PM
It is so hard. I always shared the blame of not noticing sooner with my dogs because they are so good at hiding pain and hiding illness until it's really bad.

I can tell by the concerns you have and the questions you raise that you are doing your absolute best in this situation. This cat is really lucky to have you. :grouphug:

justncase
October 17th, 2005, 02:49 PM
All one can really hope to do in situations such as this is to try and make a well-informed decision based on the facts, what is available treatment-wise, and also( unfortunately) what one can afford. According to your post, it would appear that you are missing vital information in order to make any kind of a decision. Is that really what you are looking for? Some definitive proof in order to base your decision? Your heading ".. possible cancer" was followed by your post containing these words " we have most of our medical questions answered(as well as they can be) ....it was not possible to really say whether or not the mass showing in the xray was the fluid or tumors. ....all that meant was that the mass on the lungs were probably cancer. ...they could only tell us with confidence it was cancer. but of course, without a biopsy you cannot confirm this." You ask what a visit to an oncologist would accomplish and what possible benefit there would be to receiving a confirmation. Is that not what is needed in order to base your decision? Of course , it is possible to make a decision without any kind of facts to support it , but is does not sound as though you make decisions that way. Do you not want to know what the mass is? How can one say what can be offered treatment-wise when results are inconclusive? Fluid in the lungs could account for the appearance of a " mass", it could also be responsible for the laboured breathing and eventual weight loss because fluid in the lungs does nothing to encourage a cat to eat.
I cannot say what you should or should not do. According to Dr. Martin Goldstein, DVM , world-renown New York holistic vet, author, and lecturer he has this to say concerning cancer (he treats those given up as hopeless by their vets- not only for cancer but other diseases considered fatal as well):

"By the time I see a pet with cancer the owner has likely heard the diagnosis from his own vet and had days, perhaps weeks to ponder the news.Chances are he's become frantic, depressed or just plain pessimistic,... if the pet has gone through a regimen of chemotherapy or radiation which hasn't eradicated the cancer, the owner is likely to be all the gloomier.How can a pet whose life is devoted to pleasing his master be unaware of this attitude? That's why during a cancer patient's first visit even before I take a blood sample ... I deal with the owner too. I show him albums of before and after pictures of terminally ill dogs and cats we've saved with Immuno-Augmentative-Therapy and other holistic measures. I tell him the stories I've told in this book, I make him understand that cancer is not a death sentence, that patients do get well(page 289)...." On page 298 he says " There's one .phenomenon that I think of as spiritual because it occurs among some pets with no explanation except possibly that their spirits have prevailed. With every serious case I do what I can to instill hope in a patient's owner. Holistic medicine is nothing if not a therapy of hope until an animal actually dies there's hope of recovery from even the most dire condition because when you allow for miracles by persisting with the right natural supplements , sometimes they occur. Keep up hope, I tell those owners, for hope breeds perseverance and perseverance, I'm convinced, is often the element that makes the difference in desperate cases)- The Nature of Animal Healing

There are others who follow his course of treatments. Did your cat have a blood test? It would certainly show the presence of cancer cells if a mass that large was cancerous. Vincristine is something that has has great success in treating various forms of cancer. There are others. If you are looking for options it would be helpful to determine whether or not your cat actually has cancer.( do you live in the US?)

jawert1
October 17th, 2005, 03:00 PM
My thoughts and prayers are with you and your kitty, as no matter what the prognosis, this is an incredibly difficult time for you both. After losing my springer spaniel to a ruptured splenic tumour (she was fine one minute - 10 later just the opposite), I know how difficult it is to get hit with that diagnosis, knowing that I had no warning, no signs, no nothing. The best you can do, you are already doing. Make a list of questions to take with you to the vet if verbalizing fails (I know it did for me). Most importantly, know that we're all plugging for you both :)

CyberKitten
October 17th, 2005, 03:26 PM
I am very sorry to hear about your dog's possible cancer. This is a tough decision and I think LR has provided you with some good questions. You and your family know your cat and I think as you talk this over with an oncologist, you will have a much better idea of whether it is worthwhile to pursue aggressive treatment. Chemotheraphy is not always indiacted for all cancer patients and only your oncologist can provide you with info to make a decision about that. Has anyone recommended surgery? Do you know what stage the cancer is at? Is it possible to build up your cat's health so that she could withstand aggressive treatment whether it is chemo, surgery or other kinds of treatment?

Many cats are doing very well with cancer treatments and you have to weigh whether the quality of life your cat would have as she lives thru the treatment is good enough to make it worhwhile. I would really wait until you have more information before making any decisions - there have been some amazing recoveries. That said, I do not know any of the medical data regarding your beloved kitty's situation so can only make general observations.

Cats actually tolerate chemotherapy very well, much better than we humans and usually, they sometimes loose their whiskers - which grow back in. The progression of cancer of course is another matter. Have you consulted other people whose cats have cancer?

This web site (which I often share with my young patients who have cancer) is of a cat named Punkie Louise who is battling cancer. Now, her situation may be completely different than your kitty's but it might be good to talk to someone whose cat is going through this to discover how it all might affect your cat and your family.

http://www.barbarascamera.com/punkie.htm

I wish you well in your deliberations and will keep you and your cat in my thoughts!

justncase
October 17th, 2005, 04:45 PM
Again, I ask " Do you live in the US? Britain?" There is a reason for my question. There is something that is available in the U.S. , Britain, and just about anywhere else except Canada that is wonderfully supportive and even curative for various forms of cancer. It also helps recovery in the very ill and stimulates the appetite. Substantiated by qualified vets. There's no use posting what it is, and its success if you live in Canada.

milo's mama
October 17th, 2005, 04:51 PM
you are all very wonderful. just being able to finally allow myself to talk about it in these terms is helpful. i constantly feel this heavy sadness in my heart, but at least i want my brain to be clear... at least!! :)

and yes, i live in the USofA.

doggy lover
October 17th, 2005, 04:55 PM
My thoughts are with you, it is a hard choice to make, keep us updated on how your cat does. :fingerscr

BMDLuver
October 17th, 2005, 04:57 PM
Again, I ask " Do you live in the US? Britain?" There is a reason for my question. There is something that is available in the U.S. , Britain, and just about anywhere else except Canada that is wonderfully supportive and even curative for various forms of cancer. It also helps recovery in the very ill and stimulates the appetite. Substantiated by qualified vets. There's no use posting what it is, and its success if you live in Canada.
As Tamiflu was not available in Canada when it was required yet vets were able to get it via the states, I'm not sure why the "no use posting what it is" as availability is the least hurdle in Canada.

mycat
October 17th, 2005, 11:50 PM
I wonder if Tamiflu is the same drug to treat influenza in human ?

I see Canadian pharmacy sell it here:

http://www.canadapharmacy.com/cart/index.cfm?fuseaction=product_detail&producturlname=Tamiflu.Oseltamivir&productid=2446&ovmkt=DM49PN020MJVMJQBVO1K63QV4C&OVRAW=tamiflu&OVKEY=tamiflu&OVMTC=standard

Do you think I am wrong ?

Prin
October 17th, 2005, 11:52 PM
I read that they couldn't use Tamiflu on the bird flu, so maybe. I mean they wouldn't try it if it wasn't made for flus, right?

mycat
October 18th, 2005, 12:09 AM
Sorry I am confused. Is the product treat cancer Tamiflu or Transfer Factor Plus ?

BMDLuver
October 18th, 2005, 08:55 AM
We purchase two cases of Tamiflu through the DMV here in Montreal. It really helps young pups to cope with some of the symptoms that go along with parvovirus. The DMV has had great success with it and I've seen the results first hand in 24 hours of using it.

BMDLuver
October 18th, 2005, 08:58 AM
Yes, Tamiflu is used in the US to help with flu symptoms in human patients. It is also being considered for Avian Flu but as a human strain has not developed yet and the likelyhood of the virus mutating in humans, they are saying now that it most likely will not be an effective choice. That is not stopping countries from purchasing it in huge volume for just in case of a pandemic.

milo's mama
October 18th, 2005, 01:31 PM
thank you for this interesting discussion. of course, since there is not even a real diagonsis yet (no biospy = no diagnosis) then your suggestion is not an option at this point.

we went to the regular vet last night for a chest tap. thankfully her chest cavity sounded relatively clear and a tap was not needed at the time.

however, she has lost another 1lb since last week :(

at any rate, we see the oncologist tomorrow. hopefully we can get some more answers then and make a fully formed decision for treatment (or not) based upon those results.

i will keep you all updated!

justncase
October 18th, 2005, 01:54 PM
Mycat, in answer to your question, Transfer Factor Plus is not the same as Tamiflu(seeing as your cat also has cancer, you may want to also consider it for your cat)

Milo's mama, thanks for the update. The fact that there was a relatively clear chest cavity is a good sign. It may help to narrow down the possibilities of what the "mass "actually is, and whether or not the lack of fluid in the chest cavity changes the appearance and size of this" mass".Transfer Factor Plus isn't used only when there is a diagnosis of cancer, it's used successfully for many other conditions and illnesses besides . It supports the immune system( always important when there is an illness) and can strengthen an ailing pet. What's more, for all of this, it's non-toxic. You are fortunate that this is availble for you to , at least, consider using because you live in the US.

CyberKitten
October 18th, 2005, 02:31 PM
There is no product yet to have an "even curative for various forms of cancer" as was suggested here. I would be jumping for joy is one existed - needless to say - and would gladly be rid of the hassle of all those bureacratic forms for our cancer protocols but my point is to please be careful when assessing what many call alternate treatments. Even tho the FDA and here, Health Canada, is not always perfect and sometimes I wonder what they're thinking - thy do for the most part get it right. Now if pharmacutical companies were less the creatures we are, that would be wonderful too. But one has to be extremely careful in assessing a product with ony anectodail information. And alas, such products are not regulated so one does not even know what you are buying.

I am not opposed to using alternate substances. I use Rescue Remedy and cocculine for my kitty and cannot scientifically tell you why they work. But if she had cancer, I would see an feline oncologist (if one exists) or an oncologist to get the best help I could. You might look into clinical trials too - once you have a diagnosis.

Good luck and take care!!!

doggy lover
October 18th, 2005, 06:48 PM
You can get tamiflu here we used it last year at the nursing home I work at for the residents who had the flu. There was alot of it going around last year.

mycat
October 18th, 2005, 11:01 PM
however, she has lost another 1lb since last week :(

at any rate, we see the oncologist tomorrow. hopefully we can get some more answers then and make a fully formed decision for treatment (or not) based upon those results. [/QUOTE]

Don't want to sadden you, but here is what I know about chemo:

1) It will be expensive (3500$ and above)
2) It will take long time (24 weeks)
3) IF it works (I mean IF), it will not cure cancer, but only put it into remission state. The cancer will come back. And this time, chemo will give up. Expect lifetime is on average 9-15 months.

If money is not your constraint, then, IMO, go for it :-(

About weight loss, if you want him to go thru chemo, you need to stop it. Since he doesn't like to eat, use force-feeding. It's somewhat awkward in the beginning, but then you will get used to it. If you can cook your own food (more fat, less protein, to contain cancer), then it will be much better.

CyberKitten
October 19th, 2005, 12:04 AM
I am sorry to hear your kitty is not doing well. I do hope you have a productive meeting with the oncologist.

Where on earth did anyone get info that Tamiflu is not available in Canada? (I just noticed this now - did not have time did read every single line here). It is indeed available(it is in my CPS directory which means the Cdn Pharm Society obviously deals with it.)

My dad - on a whim and because he's nosy :D - wentto visit a local pharmacy for info on Tamiflu. He was told they did not have any in stock but could get some for him in 1-2 days. It's costly though - $6 a pill approx so for 10, that's $60, yikes!

It did not work at all however on a little girl in Vietnam. I rather liked what one person (not sure who, it was background noise)said on CNN tonight. He suggested people should be more afraid of "bird flu" from the birds they eat now - like the fried chicken that puts the pounds on. :D

milo's mama
October 23rd, 2005, 09:04 PM
update....

meeting with oncologist went relatively well. however, the front right paw was now all gimpy and so they feared for a blood clot that would indicate possible missed heart disease diagnosis.

therefore, we did another echocardiogram, read by certified cardiologist. like our previous diagnostic, no evidence of heart disease.

we then proceeded with an abdomen ultrasound. nothing.

we then proceeded with a CT scan.... and there they saw the end. she indeed had a tumor that had destroyed her entire left lung lobe. nothing was left there. it also had metastasized into her right lung. the gimpy paw was just another clinical symptom of the spreading cancer. a true confirmation with an intrusive biospy was just not possible with her weak condition. however, we were satisfied with the extent of her diagnosis.

it was hard to believe that this dramatic decline in health was only clinically evident for literally the past 2 weeks. but it was obvious with the advancing aggressiveness of the tumors and the fact that she was now refusing to move or eat at all (and only drink water when offered) what our options were. i'm a real advocate for a natural death, and it still took me a long time to come to the moral decision of euthansia. but it was understood that the probable natural death for her would be suffocation due to buildup of lung fluid, and that was just not a bearable suffering for her. based upon the advice of the oncologist (and the reality of the real decline in quality of health) we decided sooner than later, meaning friday night.

we wanted a home euthansia and our local vet does house calls. but the next available appt was in 6 days!! grr....

so we went to the hospital with her favorite blanket we bought on our honeymoon in peru and her favorite little lazy basket. she did, indeed, look horrible although her mind was definitely still alert. she perked up and meowed when she saw us (no doubt because she thought she was going home, which only saddened us more) and she continually tried to pick up her head to see us. her eyes had lost their usual sparkling curiousity but her face was still so beautiful. she laid on her favorite blanket and we petted her for several minutes. she was only 12 years old and it still seemed so unfair.

the act itself was nothing extraordinary. intellectually i understand the bond between human and animal species, but i am still always surprised by the real depth of the grief at the final moment.

our remaining kitties paid their respects and then we drove upstate to the country to bury her. it is a beautiful little grave and we know she is in peace, wrapped in her favorite blanket, tucked in her favorite basket, on the edge of the woods, facing the mountains.

as we were driving back down to the city, one of the local radio stations had a call-in contest. the person who won was on the air, and her name was samantha. the same as our beloved cat. dear samantha, we know you were giving us a sign that you are well and up doing whatever happy things you do up in kitty heaven!!

so now it's over. we miss her terribly. she loved us for 12 good years and we know she loved us right up to the end. we only hope she knew and felt how much we loved her in return.

thank you for letting me write this, however measly cathartic it has been!!

dear samantha, we love you. rest in peace.

CyberKitten
October 23rd, 2005, 10:00 PM
Oh my Gosh!! I am so very sorry for your loss - what an agressive cancer she seems to have had. Cats are very effective at hiding pain and other symptoms. I marvel that you have such fortitude to write of this painful period with such eloquence. Thank you for sharing such a personal and wrenching experience with us and I hope all the wonderful times you had with Samantha will sustain you through this time.

She will always be a part of you and it would seem she has already found a way to let you know she is OK up at the bridge, active and playing. Take care of yourself too - it is important to take time to grieve and to be good to yourself during this time! :grouphug: :grouphug:

doggy lover
October 24th, 2005, 04:50 PM
Sorry to hear of your loss, my thoughts are with you. Rest in peace Samantha :angel:

Roxy's_MA
October 24th, 2005, 06:33 PM
:sorry: I am very sorry hear about you loss. Samatha is in a better place now with no more suffering. RIP Samatha

Airlies
March 26th, 2006, 10:46 AM
update....

meeting with oncologist went relatively well. however, the front right paw was now all gimpy and so they feared for a blood clot that would indicate possible missed heart disease diagnosis.

therefore, we did another echocardiogram, read by certified cardiologist. like our previous diagnostic, no evidence of heart disease.

we then proceeded with an abdomen ultrasound. nothing.

we then proceeded with a CT scan.... and there they saw the end. she indeed had a tumor that had destroyed her entire left lung lobe. nothing was left there. it also had metastasized into her right lung. the gimpy paw was just another clinical symptom of the spreading cancer. a true confirmation with an intrusive biospy was just not possible with her weak condition. however, we were satisfied with the extent of her diagnosis.

it was hard to believe that this dramatic decline in health was only clinically evident for literally the past 2 weeks. but it was obvious with the advancing aggressiveness of the tumors and the fact that she was now refusing to move or eat at all (and only drink water when offered) what our options were. i'm a real advocate for a natural death, and it still took me a long time to come to the moral decision of euthansia. but it was understood that the probable natural death for her would be suffocation due to buildup of lung fluid, and that was just not a bearable suffering for her. based upon the advice of the oncologist (and the reality of the real decline in quality of health) we decided sooner than later, meaning friday night.

we wanted a home euthansia and our local vet does house calls. but the next available appt was in 6 days!! grr....

so we went to the hospital with her favorite blanket we bought on our honeymoon in peru and her favorite little lazy basket. she did, indeed, look horrible although her mind was definitely still alert. she perked up and meowed when she saw us (no doubt because she thought she was going home, which only saddened us more) and she continually tried to pick up her head to see us. her eyes had lost their usual sparkling curiousity but her face was still so beautiful. she laid on her favorite blanket and we petted her for several minutes. she was only 12 years old and it still seemed so unfair.

the act itself was nothing extraordinary. intellectually i understand the bond between human and animal species, but i am still always surprised by the real depth of the grief at the final moment.

our remaining kitties paid their respects and then we drove upstate to the country to bury her. it is a beautiful little grave and we know she is in peace, wrapped in her favorite blanket, tucked in her favorite basket, on the edge of the woods, facing the mountains.

as we were driving back down to the city, one of the local radio stations had a call-in contest. the person who won was on the air, and her name was samantha. the same as our beloved cat. dear samantha, we know you were giving us a sign that you are well and up doing whatever happy things you do up in kitty heaven!!

so now it's over. we miss her terribly. she loved us for 12 good years and we know she loved us right up to the end. we only hope she knew and felt how much we loved her in return.

thank you for letting me write this, however measly cathartic it has been!!

dear samantha, we love you. rest in peace.

I am so sorry for your loss. I cried while I read your post becuase it was so touching and heartfelt. Please know that Samantha felt your love and understood that you loved her and will always love her. You did everything you could for her, including the unselfish and courageous decision to let her go to peace.

The love, affection, devotion and joy our pts give us is a miracle. I am honoured for being loved by all the pets who have shared their lives with me.

Hugs to you and your family!

Airlies

Mishkamax
March 26th, 2006, 02:56 PM
Oh I am so sorry, I really do feel for you, the responsibility to care for them to the end and having to make such hard decisions, truely shows our love for them. Spending small fortunes at the vets, even though we know that in the end they will have to be put to sleep. The little furrballs turn somehow into our own children and having to part with them, sometimes is too much to bear. Boris my persian tabby did just that, hid his illness, until it was too late, but even then I tried everything I could, it was futile. I had to let my beautiful Boris go in January, he was 15 years, then just two weeks ago I had to let go my beloved Max he was nearly 12 years. The pain and hurt has been unbearable, but I know that I had to do it, any pain and suffering could'nt go any further. The people on this site are so sympathetic and it really has helped me coming on here. Writing about Max in the 'Pet Cemetry' I found very cathartic, it really did help me.

Your baby will be at the bridge...... Now cracks a noble heart. Goodnight Sweet Prince; and may flights of angels sing thee to thy rest.

OntarioGreys
March 26th, 2006, 03:15 PM
editing because I responded before realizing the date of the post. My sympathies in your loss

LM1313
March 26th, 2006, 10:26 PM
I'm so sorry for your loss. :( You did the right thing, but that doesn't make it any easier, does it? :(