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Dusty, the flying dog :)

Jazz&Cricket
October 14th, 2005, 11:03 AM
Well, we've had Dusty for about 3 1/2 months now (he's a darling...but comes by the name Dusty BAD A** honestly. I have a problem that I've never encountered with any of my other dogs, and in fact, no trainer I've spoken to has encountered this. So, I'm asking all of you.

Dusty is our foundling...he's about a year old (according to the vet), weighs 19 lbs. and appears to be a Llasa Apso, something mix - we think Jack Russell only because he's so bouncy!! :)

Dusty, doesn't just jump up to greet...you know, back paws on the floor...Oh no....Dusty FLIES into the air...straight up like he's on a pogo stick...so high, that he can touch my nose!! I'm about 5'5...so we're talking a fair leap here. The hard part, it's a totally unpredicable action...sometimes he does, sometimes he doesn't..and you can't see it coming, its so fast! Sometimes, if he's REALLY in fine form, he uses his teeth... :eek: he's not biting...but he's caught my shirt on occasion (no teethmarks or tears)
Has anyone got any idea how I can train him to quit? Other than this...he's a great little dog...one of the best mousers I have (I'm firing the cats!!) I am still trying to figure out why someone would have abandoned this little guy!

Puppyluv
October 14th, 2005, 11:42 AM
I swear that Layla has part kangaroo in her, because you should see her soar!!! I have this half-wall that separates part of my kitchen from the eating room (about 4.5 feet tall and with the sink, 3 feet wide) and I came home one day and she had jumped over this wall and into my kitchen (which was otherwise closed off by doors, so I know this is how she crossed, not to mention the knocked over stuff that was sitting on the wall/counter). She clears snow-fences with ease, and if I let her, would jump up at anyone too. But that's the thing, you can't let them do it. Keep him a short leash, and as soon as he jumps up step down on it, never ever let him jump up, no exceptions.

doggy lover
October 14th, 2005, 05:31 PM
Tucker gets bouncy when people come over, I grab him by the collar and get him to settle befor I let him go it seems to work. I also put my hand in front of him when he tries it with me which isn't very often. Were your bc's jumpy at all? Tuckers breeder has bc's and jack russels, she likes active dogs :D

Roxy's_MA
October 14th, 2005, 05:51 PM
Sounds like it might be part Jack. Roxy does this. Almost like a tigger. Straigt up, and she can jump about 5 feet or more in the air. Roxy does this to greet us when we get home. I often call her my jumping jack when I greet her. I find that I have to get down to her level to greet her in order to prevent the jumping.

If it is a Jack, you may have a hard time getting it out of him, as that is part of the nature of the breed. Doesn't mean it is impossible to teach him not to do it, it just might take some time and patience.

Also just as a side note: Roxy not only flies, she can climb. She once chased a the neighbors cat 10 feet up a tree. The tree did't go straight up, but had a pretty decent incline.

doggy lover
October 14th, 2005, 05:52 PM
Put them in a box and you'd have a jack in the box. LOL only joking. ;)

Prin
October 14th, 2005, 05:58 PM
My dad taught his jack to jump and then stop jumping... I don't know if you can try that. He doggy was abandoned because he jumped on the preggo wifey and they didn't know what he would do to a baby... He doesn't jump anymore unless you ask him. :)

Roxy's_MA
October 14th, 2005, 06:18 PM
My dad taught his jack to jump and then stop jumping... I don't know if you can try that. He doggy was abandoned because he jumped on the preggo wifey and they didn't know what he would do to a baby... He doesn't jump anymore unless you ask him. :)

I like that idea. They seem to get so much pleasure and fun out of the jumping, it would be a shame to cut them off totally. Jumping is a way I can excercise my dog in the house. We play games were she jumps for the toy and grabs it. I mix up the jumping and grabbing the toy with fetching the toy, and it really wears her out.

Prin
October 14th, 2005, 06:26 PM
I like that idea. They seem to get so much pleasure and fun out of the jumping, it would be a shame to cut them off totally. LOL Doggy version of catnip? :D

tenderfoot
October 16th, 2005, 11:00 PM
It could be hard on his back so you would do well to discourage it. It is really just like teaching the 'off' command. 'off' means 4 feet on the ground.
You can try to anticipate it, but you are just as well of f to just teach him 'off' and reward him when he has 4 feet on the floor.
You as the parent dictate your dogs manners. Know that he will want to jump so set him up for learning. Put him on the leash and have a friend just stand there and do nothing – you approach the person with your dog from across the room. As you see your dog start to shift his weight to jump up, you give a couple of leash corrections (dinks on the collar) and say ‘OFF’ in a firm (not loud) tone and walk away from the person.
Then you do it again. Each time giving a correction for the bad choice and walking away. In about three tries your dog should start to realize his mistakes and stay down – typically he will actually sit on his own volition. When he is good, then reward him with praise and soft touch. Repeat this game a couple of more times to ensure success and learning.
Ideally you have to stop him as he is thinking about jumping up not when he is half way in the air - he can't stop himself then. Try to anticipate his actions and tell him ‘off’ before he has a chance to react. This is teaching you to read your dog's thoughts and to react in time to help him make a better choice. Always use just enough energy to get results - not so too much so you intimidate him but not so little that he blows you off. Each time and day might be a little more or less according to his mood, and as he gains respect for your word then it will be come just the hand signal or just the word and barely any energy at all.
The key is that you re-create the situation and correct the bad choices and give him another chance to make a better choice. As your dog gets good at this game, have the person pat their chest with energy and when you even see him thinking about jumping, you say 'off'. Invite him in again and again until he chooses to sit for his greeting.
The problem is usually people teach failure not success. A dog jumps up you eventually get them off and then the day goes on - but the dog never learned not to jump up. You have to give him multiple chances to make a better choice and then do it once more to enforce it and then reward the heck out of him for the good choice.
This can be taught in five minutes if done correctly.