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Is car sickness normal?

Conners
September 28th, 2005, 01:31 AM
Shasta doesn't ALWAYS get car sick, and normally I find it with who is doing the driveing. Like quick and jerky drivers. Since I'm not a driver, she doesn't get into one on a regular basis and I make sure I bring baggies and soft clothes just in case. Like I say, she could go for a car ride and not get bothered by it at times too, but other times and the shortest ride she starts to drool and you just know she's getting queezy. Is this normal for a dog not all that used to daily car rides? It's not seasonal as she gotten sick in the summer and the winter. She's sick when my brother drives and one of my g/f's drive, and both of them are heavy footed drivers that speed and break quicly and weave through traffic.
Anyone else had this problem and how did you eliminate it?
Also, is there anything she can take to prevent this?

Prin
September 28th, 2005, 01:53 AM
My big Boo gets way more anxious depending on the driver. I am a heavy foot, but he has been in the car with me so much that he knows how I drive and he's way more settled than when my bf drives. I think it's partly the predictability of the driver. Since your doggy doesn't get to ride much, she probably won't get used to it anytime soon...

Conners
September 28th, 2005, 02:32 AM
My big Boo gets way more anxious depending on the driver. I am a heavy foot, but he has been in the car with me so much that he knows how I drive and he's way more settled than when my bf drives. I think it's partly the predictability of the driver. Since your doggy doesn't get to ride much, she probably won't get used to it anytime soon...
Well, she'll be 3 near the end of October, Prin and is there anything I can give her to make her stomach relax...like graval for doggies?

Prin
September 28th, 2005, 03:42 AM
The problem with gravol is it actually takes a while to wear off. Depending on the dose, you could have a groggy doggy for 3 hours or more... Maybe rescue remedy? I have never used it but other people on the site have.

CyberKitten
September 28th, 2005, 08:01 AM
Gravol is a pretty heavy duty med for that use!! (Plus, it affects every animal, incl people differently and you would want to try your dog on it first before giving it to him in a car ride and then discovering it made her hyper!!)

My vet recommends cocculine, which is a natural organic ingredient , like Rescue Remedy. I have tried cocculine with my cat and it works very well but again, I'd try it first. Rescue Remedy might also help.

OR, you could set up a schedule where she gets used to driving if that is the problem.

Conners
September 28th, 2005, 09:38 AM
Where would I get Rescue Remedy? From the vet or the pet stores?

Lucky Rescue
September 28th, 2005, 10:59 AM
You can get Rescue Remedy at Independant grocery stores, but you have to start giving it a few days before the car ride.

My vet recommends cocculine, which is a natural organic ingredient
A vet on this board also recommended this.

For a long car trip, Gravol would be better.

Conners
September 28th, 2005, 01:29 PM
You can get Rescue Remedy at Independant grocery stores, but you have to start giving it a few days before the car ride.


A vet on this board also recommended this.

For a long car trip, Gravol would be better.
Hmmm...sometimes that would be a bit of a problem as I'm not always sure when we will be going in the car unless of course, it was for an appointment to the vet, etc.
If I were to give her Gavol, she weighs 50 pounds, so how much of a tablet would I give her?
Is Rescue Remedy in the pet section of the grocery store and is that the actual name? I hate to have to drug her if I don't need to, but I suppose with certain drivers, it's better than her throwing up and feeling queezy. Do you think she will outgrow it? She's already better than she was, as she got sick no matter who was driving before. Now it's just the ones I'd like to take a bat to their heads and tell them to stop the darn jerking! LOL :rolleyes:

SnowDancer
September 28th, 2005, 01:52 PM
It may sound crazy, but what worked for my friend's Retriever who for 6 years could never go in the car without being sick was a small scoop of Vanilla ice cream before the trip. They were skeptical to try it, but what the heck - it worked. So for rest of her life she enjoyed going everywhere with the family - and her ice cream. Guess she wasn't lactose intolerant.

StaceyB
September 28th, 2005, 02:15 PM
I get sick myself when the driver speeds up or slows down quickly. My cockatoo gets sick if she is able to watch the scenery, cars, etc. She has to be crated in the car, which is safest anyway.
I see more dogs getting car sick in the winter than any other time a year. There is a glare from the snow and the heater is on.

Lucky Rescue
September 28th, 2005, 02:41 PM
Is Rescue Remedy in the pet section of the grocery store and is that the actual name?

It's in the pharmacy section, where all the herbal supplements are. It's a small thin yellow box. If you don't see it, ask the pharmacist.

Car sickness is dogs is most often caused by anxiety rather than the motion of the car,so calming her a bit may help.

Don't feed her before a car trip.

Conners
September 28th, 2005, 05:13 PM
It's in the pharmacy section, where all the herbal supplements are. It's a small thin yellow box. If you don't see it, ask the pharmacist.

Car sickness is dogs is most often caused by anxiety rather than the motion of the car,so calming her a bit may help.

Don't feed her before a car trip.
You might have just touched on something I didn't realize. As a pup, she got car sick all the time, but now...and as I recall, it was back and forth to the vet when she was being spayed. Again when my brother bought a brand new car and kept hollaring at me not to scratch the car with her. She doesn't like anyone hollaring at me. Another time in the back of a 4X4 and she wasn't on a seat, just the back of it. She's never traveled like that before. And various different times like that. When she's sitting with me or in the back seat with me in front, she's fine. All those other times would have been stress related.
So stress related it is. I'm going to have to watch her in stressful situations and try to avoid them as much as possible. Hard when you don't drive yourself. I always bring her, her little blanket. It's more so she isn't on peoples car seats as not everyone has dogs...cabs, etc. But I also think it's a security thing too and knows she can lay on it.
By jo! I think we found the answer!!! Thanks everyone!!! :grouphug:

CyberKitten
September 28th, 2005, 09:41 PM
cocculine and Rescue Remedy are both usually found in the pharmacy or natural foods (organic) section of the grocery store. I have noticed in the Maritimes, they are either in the pharmacy or in a section that is labelled organic - usually located near the pharmacy but not always. It has been my experience that the pharmacist may know nothing about it but the customer service person in the organic foods section usually will know where to find it in 5 minutes! The products are also usually (not always) cheaper in a grocery store than in a health food store.

I really think gravol is way overdoing it. Gravol is a heavy duty medication that has some adverse side effects and I would use it only if your vet - who knows your dog's history - suggested it and gave you the precise dosage. There are other prescription medications that help nausea in pets but many pets overcome it by becoming adjusted to travel in a car. And the objective should ideally be to get to a position where the pet can travel in the vehicle without nausea and that can be more of a behaviour issue than simply medicating.

mona_b
September 28th, 2005, 10:10 PM
When my sister had her GSD and came to visit us,Torrie would always get car sick.So what she started doing was giving her Gravol.She only gave half.And it worked.Torrie only got this way with long car rides.

As for the Gravol,I have taken it for many many years,so has my daughter and my sister.We have never had any issues with it.And to be honest,I don't know anyone who has.Since we get migraines,and the sick stomach along with it,we need to take it along with whatever else we take for the migraine.Whether it be with Tylonals or Advils.When absalutely nothing works for me and my sister,we are off to the hospital for a shot of Demeral and Gravol.I really wouldn't say it was a heavy duty medication.

StaceyB
September 28th, 2005, 10:25 PM
I have never heard of an issue with gravol for car rides as long as you give the right dose. Check with vet for proper dose. I don't like the idea of medicating a dog for flights.

CyberKitten
September 28th, 2005, 10:28 PM
I beg to differ but I am talking about DOGS and not people. That is another issue again, <g> Gravol does have adverse effects and is in fact one of the medications that Health Canada receives many adverse effects forms from physicians about. It is also an abused drug (by some teenagers mainly because they have access!)

I think in part it is because people assume that since it is an OTC med, it is fine to take it. And for most of us, it is. But it is a CNS depressant and as such, needs to be taken with caution and according to directions. In children, it can cause convulsions (esp children 1 1/2 - 3 yrs of age). Along with that adverse effects, according to the CPS directory (kind of a bible for Cdn docs and pharmacists), it also can cause hallunications at high levels.

It is a good med taken when needed but I always find better meds with fewer problems for my patients undergoing chemo - but then we are talking really heavy duty meds. And loathe as I am to use personal anecdotal info, I cannot tell you when I worked in the ER - how many gravol problems we saw. While all that is true of any medication, any CNS depressant always carries with it the "rule of thumb" to be cautious!

If I have time, I will search for info online about the adverse effects of gravol. I have taken it on occasion myself to sleep and a half tab is enough to make me sleepy (but with chronic pain not to sleep, alas). One tab makes me too drowsy in the AM!

It can also act in a completely different way in some people ie, they become hyper and not sleepy or less nauseated.

StaceyB
September 28th, 2005, 10:51 PM
I tend to give half the dose when I am giving the kids and dogs meds for allergies, pain(advil) than what is recommended. I have rarely had to give anything to any of them. I guess I make up for all of them.
I haven't taken gravol myself since I was a kid, my kids have never had it, nor have my dogs. I have had many students dogs take it over the years w/o any problems but that doesn't mean there hasn't been with others especially if they receive an overdose.

Prin
September 28th, 2005, 10:56 PM
Every dog is different though. With Boo, if he gets a sedative that is supposed to last a couple of hours, it lasts a couple of days. We gave him 12 hour sedatives for the ride home from PEI and they took 4 days to wear off. He got a 20 minute sedative at the vet and it took him till the next morning to wake up... You just have to know your dog's reaction to it before you expect anything from him/her.

Prin
September 28th, 2005, 10:57 PM
Oh, and a possible side effect of any sedative is hyperactivity.. So if you thought you were in hell before, imagine if your dog reacts the wrong way... :eek:

CyberKitten
September 28th, 2005, 11:06 PM
Oh I know Prin!! I saw the effects of a cat gone wild (thinking of those infamous films , ugh!!, NOT feral! ) one nite when a child came in with soooo many scratches and bites!! They had given the kitty valarian to calm her. It of course had the reverse effect and their child required stitches!! And cat bites are no fun, regardless of age!