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Disappointed.

sjat24
September 23rd, 2005, 10:05 AM
I really had my heart set on this girl http://www.petfinder.com/pet.cgi?action=2&pet=4875268&adTarget=&SessionID=43340a155fd4d21a-app5&display=&preview=1&row=0&tmpl=&stat= , But they told my hubby NO cause we live in apartment! :sad:

Well today I am going to the Montreal SPCA and if I dont find anything there then I am going to Monteregie SPCA on Saturday. But I am still so sad, I shouldn't have let myself believe I was going to get her. I felt confident that I was, but noooo.http://smilies.sofrayt.com/^/aiw/cry.gif

TobsterMom
September 23rd, 2005, 11:14 AM
I know how that feels. We applied for a sweet chocolate lab X once. I had my heart set on her. I looked at her picture every day. They even called my vet (whom I worked for at the time) for a reference, so I thought she was a sure thing. Then they phoned and said it was between us and a family with older kids. Our son was 6 and very good with our Golden (who is VERY hyper) he knows how to behave around dogs and has the pack order thing established. They chose the other family (even though they knew she was great with kids and other dogs) :sad:

We still haven't gotten a second dog, just waiting for the right one to find us. I learned not to get my hopes up, but it's super hard! :sorry:

SpanielLuver
September 23rd, 2005, 11:19 AM
sjat24,

I am the one who spoke with your husband last night. He was not told NO for Alaska for the reason that you live in an apartment, but it was explained that she had been tried in an apartment situation and she did not do well. As she is extremely active, is quite vocal, and is still in the process of being toilet trained, and apartment is not an ideal situation for her. Plus she needs someone who is experienced with this breed of dog. I understand you have not had a dog before, and as I explained Alaska is not a suitable candidate to be your first dog. You will also notice on our home site that it clearly states she will not be adopted into an apartment situation.

I also told your husband that we do adopt to people in apartments and that we would be happy to help find you a dog that would be suitable for your situation should you application be approved.

As this was the only communication your husband had with Foxys, a 5 minute conversation, I am not sure why you would have assumed you would be adopting her, especially as you yourself have not even met her or had any discussion with us about her.

I had also told your husband that I would speak with him more and that you were welcome to come to the dog run and meet us and the dogs on the weekend.

I would appreciate if you would not post such statements without giving the full story. There is an adoption process that must be followed to adopt a dog. Our main concern above all else is that the right forever home be found for Alaska and any of our other dogs. It would be very remiss of us to knowingly place her in a situation where it would be only a matter of time before she was returned.

I hope this clarifies the situation an I wish you good luck at the SPCAs.

SnowDancer
September 23rd, 2005, 12:11 PM
I have to agree that a Husky would not be the best dog for an apartment. Nothing to do with size - some of the biggest couch potatoes are the biggest guys out there. But I have an Eskimo and while Eskies are a different breed, they are not unlike the Husky in some respects. I would not be able to live in an apartment with him without getting kicked out I am sure - especially no doubt a condo. The same actually goes for small dogs who are out to protect their people and home at all costs - Dachshunds come to mind! Good luck with your search.

sjat24
September 23rd, 2005, 12:17 PM
I total understand that Alaska is not suitable for our home and especially for us we never owned adog. I shouldnt have got so attached looking a her picture everyday LOL. I know that she'll get a good home because FCC sounds very caring and knows what is suitable for her.

I didnt want to explain the whole story, I just wanted to say that I am dissapointed that living in an apartment has stop me from possible adopting her and other dogs from the past. I know some people are concerned that the dog would be barking and maybe disturbing other neighbours in our apartment building but when 80% of our neighbour are dogs owners, I cannot see them being disturbed. I know that not having any experience of personally owning a dog will hurt my future adoption process. What would be the next process, purchasing a dog from the pet store? I was hoping not to do this but the way you make it sound, I have no chance for adopting a dog in the near future or the future at all.
I hope one day to be adopting a dog from a shelter and I hope Alaska finds a good home.

Shanna

SnowDancer
September 23rd, 2005, 12:25 PM
Just a tip. Try not to look at pictures too much. Maybe look once if checking web sites and then try and meet the dog in person. That is often the defining moment. Often a person will go to a shelter intent on adopting a specific breed or dog - and then they will make eye contact with a dog and it will be love at first sight. Love at first sight can back fire - it just never has with me. My love of my life dogs were super Alpha, but after doing the "dance" after making eye contact with me, they lowered their eyes first and clung to my neck. It is a respect thing. Certainly I have been put through the ropes with our Eskimo but we adopted him at age of 13 weeks - with some baggage even then - our youngest dog up until then had been 6 months - with lots of baggage but a bit more mature. Note - Eskie puppies are not easy!

Roxy's_MA
September 23rd, 2005, 12:39 PM
I know how it feels. You see a dog online a fall in love only to find out that the dog is not available for whatever reason. I remember falling for a sweet terrier at the local humane society. I took the day off work and went down to the shelter. I was so sure I would be coming home with her(that was my mistake). I got there about 10 min after the shelter opened and there had been a line up for the little girl outside before the shelter had even opened. I guess I didn't realize how quik you have to be to get the little ones. After that I knew I had to take my time and the perfect dog would work it's way into my life. I couldn't take the dissapointment. Well I was patient, and I ended up with a dog I wouldn't trade for the world. If the dog is not suitable match, it could possibly lead to bigger dissapointment. ;) Your perfect dog is waiting somewhere in the future, just be patient, and I am sure things will work out for you.

jjgeonerd
September 23rd, 2005, 12:55 PM
It sounds like they are willing to adopt a dog out to you...just not that specific one. I would recommend going to the dog run and meeting them and the dogs as they offered. That would help them and you find the right dog for you.

Sorry to hear you were disappointed. The pictures and descriptions can be sooo cute. My wife and I were disappointed on a few dogs before we were able to adopt Gabby. We were just patient and now I can't imagine having a different dog...she is perfect! :thumbs up

Please don't get frustrated and go to a pet store.

Lucky Rescue
September 23rd, 2005, 01:15 PM
I know that not having any experience of personally owning a dog will hurt my future adoption process. What would be the next process, purchasing a dog from the pet store?

Everyone was a first time owner once. That's not the problem, and there is no need to say you'll support puppy mills by buying a petstore puppy just because Alaska is not suitable for you and your situation.

Living in an apartment is not a problem either, if you get the right dog. I suggest an adult dog, who is housetrained and who can safely be left alone.

Unfortunately, the dog we want is not always the best one for us. I really wanted a young(puppy), brindled male pit bull, but it turned out the best dog for me was an adult, blue fawn female and I"ve never ever regretted bringing her home!

The right dog for you is definitely out there, and when you find him/her, you'll be glad you waited!:)

BMDLuver
September 23rd, 2005, 01:30 PM
SJAT, why don't you consider fostering for a rescue organization? That way it will help you to decide what works for you and your husband in the apartment, what age works, what type of dog, etc... Most if not all rescues give first option to fosters to adopt so it's a good way to help with a decisions as well. As you have two cats, it also ensures that there will be a harmony in your home with all animals. JMHO. :)

Roxy's_MA
September 23rd, 2005, 01:35 PM
If you do decide to go the route of buying a dog, PLEASE look for a reputable breeder and not a pet store.

SpanielLuver
September 23rd, 2005, 01:39 PM
BMDLuver has written exactly the same as I was going to write regarding fostering to start with. This is a good way to start if you have not had a dog before, especially if you are looking at adopting a puppy. A lot of potential adopters have realized they are not ready to adopt or that an older dog would be a better match, but in the meantime the dog finds a good home, the fosters can help another dog and they always get first option to adopt.

Please let me correct your statement I was hoping not to do this but the way you make it sound, I have no chance for adopting a dog in the near future or the future at all.

We have not made this statement at all in either conversation or on this board. Your husband phoned to find out how the process worked and he was asked to complete the online adoption application as the first step. As of now I have not received anything. We will be more than happy to review it and see how we can help you adopt or foster. If we can't help with the dogs we have, we will give you other options and other rescues who maybe able to help.

Lissa
September 23rd, 2005, 02:12 PM
While I believe and understand that Alaska is not a good fit for the OP, I can certainly understand her disappointment and frustration.

I am NOT pointing my finger at anyone but I do think that some people get turned away and/or are written off immediately because they don't meet a specific requirement. I know that rescues have good intentions but I also think that by waiting for the perfect home for a particular dog, they turn away a lot of great dog owners.

I am so glad that I found Dodger and didn't have to try and adopt him because I know I wouldn't have been chosen. Seeing as I was a first time dog owner, with no hound experience or fenced backyard, or a vet as a reference, I wouldn't have even been considered. I also have yet to meet a hound as well trained as Dodger, so I know he couldn't have found a more perfect home.

jiorji
September 23rd, 2005, 02:22 PM
maybe it wasn't meant to be. I believe animals choose their human companions. personal experience, I didn't want a cat.....I endep up with it anyways. She was one of 3 feral cat kittens. when my parents moved to the house where the kittens were born 2 eventually disappeared and only this one stayed behind. I caught it to take to the shelter to give it a good life and i called a LOT of shelters and none wanted to take it. So weird. They were either full or didn't answer the phone.
Now I have a huge collection of cat hairs all over the apartment...She returns the love lol

anyway, I'm 100% positive you'll find a doggie :) good luck and post pictures as soon as you get it :D

BMDLuver
September 23rd, 2005, 02:23 PM
I am NOT pointing my finger at anyone but I do think that some people get turned away and/or are written off immediately because they don't meet a specific requirement. I know that rescues have good intentions but I also think that by waiting for the perfect home for a particular dog, they turn away a lot of great dog owners.
Rescues test out dogs in many foster homes in various situations. Some dogs cannot cope in certain situations as proven in the foster home. This is the reason to go to rescue in lieu of a shelter where you can get a complete unknown. Many rescues have placed well over 200 dogs in one year and have gained a wealth of knowledge on what works and what doesn't. This does not mean that a home is not a good one but that for a particuliar dog it may not work. A rescuers purpose is to find a match for dog and adopter that they hope works first shot.. it's also not fair to bounce a dog back n forth from foster to adopter to foster when you know it's not going to work. Dogs in foster care are not being harmed in any way by waiting for the right home. They are part of a family and well loved during their stay. I would much rather see one move than multiple moves by waiting just a bit longer for the right match... but hey, that's JMHO. :) A less than 3% return rate is pretty darn good odds for any rescue. :thumbs up

SpanielLuver
September 23rd, 2005, 02:30 PM
I am NOT pointing my finger at anyone but I do think that some people get turned away and/or are written off immediately because they don't meet a specific requirement. I know that rescues have good intentions but I also think that by waiting for the perfect home for a particular dog, they turn away a lot of great dog owners.

I agree. I, myself, would most likely have been refused adoption had I just walked in to adopt. No fenced yard, work during the day, husband not 100% in favour of having a dogs (we have 4 now, lol), pretty much a lot against me. That is why we have tried to be pretty flexible and approach each case individually. Some of our best adopters and fosters have been people who could not adopt from other rescues. But the fact still remains that the dog is the number 1 priority, a lot of effort from the fosters goes into training the dogs, working with them on different issues if needed and no dog is placed until we and the foster parents agree that this would be the best home for the dog, if that takes one week or 2 months then so be it.

Even if we turn down a possible adopter for a particular dog, we do keep their application active and still try to find a good match.

Lissa
September 23rd, 2005, 02:54 PM
I know that the animal to be adopted has to be the first priority and I am very impressed that you acknowledge that this can happen.

I am going to keep your rescue in mind as I think you have been very clear and very fair about everything. Your posts have made me less skeptical about rescues as I did write my first post with a bit of an attitude :p !

SnowDancer
September 23rd, 2005, 02:55 PM
Never met a hound that didn't love me - actually any dog for that matter. But I do not have a fenced yard - not that I would leave a hound in one unless there was concrete 10 feet deep to prevent digging out - we have had a Beagle and 7 Dachshunds so I know of what I speak And of course my Eskimo could jump a 6 ft. fence and then tumble to his death. For this reason, I adopt my pets through my vet.

Lucky Rescue
September 23rd, 2005, 03:16 PM
We are not expecting "perfection" in the search for homes, just for the very best home we can find for that particular animal. Some are much easier and more adaptable, others have very specific needs. If we ignore those needs, the adopter is likely to return the animal and that is not fair to anyone, especially the poor cat/dog who is being bounced around.

sjat24, since you have two cats, a puppy is not a good idea for you since adult cats and puppies are one of the worst combinations. Unless you are prepared to have stressed cats (who may hide constantly or even avoid the litterbox) and do tons of training, confining and supervision for a long while, I would choose an adult dog.

I chose my dog because she was living in a home with cats, and it was known that she was very good with them.

You just have to figure out what quality is most important to you, then find a dog with that quality.

mafiaprincess
September 23rd, 2005, 03:23 PM
I'd never do a puppy in an apartment again. My roomate eventually chose a pottybox, cause it was too hard to catch an accident and whisk the dog outside.

In the learning curve of first dog ever.. a puppy in an apartment wasn't good.. We should have gotten one a year or older too.

Puppyluv
September 23rd, 2005, 03:50 PM
I know some people are concerned that the dog would be barking and maybe disturbing other neighbours in our apartment building but when 80% of our neighbour are dogs owners, I cannot see them being disturbed.
Shanna
Don't be so sure about that. Just because someone owns a dog doesn't mean they want to listen to other dogs bark.

Prin
September 23rd, 2005, 04:24 PM
Puppyluv- I was going to say the SAME thing. My neighbors' dog barked ALL DAY and I was going nuts- I was actually shaking from the stress it caused me. I have 2 dogs but they don't bark. Just because somebody has a dog, it doesn't mean they LIKE barking nor does it mean they will tolerate it at all. Frankly, nobody finds a barking dog pleasant at all.

MIA
September 23rd, 2005, 04:30 PM
I lived in an apartment and my neighbors had a dog who barked all day, you bet I complained! Just because I love dogs doesn't mean I want to hear one bark all day!!!!! Most people who live around me hate me, not because of my dogs because I expect them to be responsible for THEIRS!!!! LOL

mafiaprincess
September 23rd, 2005, 04:32 PM
The 4 closest neighbours and us have dogs. I feel bad when mine barks and either go shush her or bring her in. The neighbours behind us and their neighbours have 2 dogs and 1 dog. And they keep each other going. One barks and it is a chorus. I can tell you just because I have a dog, that it isn't okay to let yours go on and on.

Puppyluv
September 23rd, 2005, 04:53 PM
Oh i know, barking dogs drive me NUTS. Layla is soo quiet, so I couldn't be more grateful (and I'm sure my neighbours agree). It's really not fair to appartment/condo neighbours to own an excessively barking dog. The dogs across the street from me are always barking and even that drives me nuts, because it goes on for at least an hour at a time, which makes me wonder where the owners always are :evil:

Roxy's_MA
September 23rd, 2005, 05:00 PM
The only thing worse than neighbors with barking dogs are neighbors who open the front door and just let their dogs out, then the dogs come and rip apart everyone in the neighborhoods garbage.

Puppyluv
September 23rd, 2005, 05:06 PM
Yes! or people who come home, and tie their agressive dog outside their appartment, on a busy sidewalk, so that whenever someone walks by (with or without a dog) it lunges at you.
(Sorry, there's a man about a block away from me who does this, and refuses to do anything about it, saying that if we dont like it, we can walk on the other side of the street)

I think responsible pet owners get more frustrated by irresponsible pet owners than non pet owners do. That's why saying "oh they all have dogs, so they won't mind if my dog does (insert annoying behaviour here)" just doesn't cut it.

Lucky Rescue
September 23rd, 2005, 06:46 PM
I think responsible pet owners get more frustrated by irresponsible pet owners than non pet owners do.

How true is that?? I've always had cats, and it makes me nuts when other people's cats come on my property, spraying and fighting with my cats. I keep my cats home, and s/n all of them and it seems pointless since so many other idiots do not! :mad:

I have a dog, and irresponsible dog owners make me much more angry than they do non-dog owners, I'm sure! I sure wouldn't want to listen to a dog barking all day.

the gang
September 23rd, 2005, 07:08 PM
I Agree With Foxys And Teddys!! They Have Been Doing This For A Long Time, Listen And Take Notes They Really Know What They Are Talking About, And Rember What Is Worth Waiting For Is Worth Getting, But Please Do Your Homework We Have Lots Of Dogs In Rescue, And Be Carefull With The Small Breeds They Can Be Yappy, I Should Know I Have 3 Min Pins Good Luck To You.

Chiceh
September 23rd, 2005, 08:58 PM
I agree with them. A large dog needs room to move around. And even if you own dogs, doesn't mean you want to listen to other dogs bark.
Good luck, I hope someday you can experience the joy of owning dogs.
Chiceh :crazy:

Crystal M
September 23rd, 2005, 09:15 PM
[QUOTE=Deb's Lucky Rescue.

Unfortunately, the dog we want is not always the best one for us. I really wanted a young(puppy), brindled male pit bull, but it turned out the best dog for me was an adult, blue fawn female and I"ve never ever regretted bringing her home![/QUOTE]

I have never adopted an animal, most of my animals where strays. I'm alittle interested in what you have said above because my dog was a pitbull (she wasn't a stray I got her from a relative). How did they come to the conculsion that a pitbull was not for you?

twinmommy
September 23rd, 2005, 09:42 PM
fostering is a great suggestion, I highly recommend it. !!! ;)

Also, have you thought of rescuing a greyhound? They are perfect appartment dogs.

Try not to be too dissapointed Sjat, the perfect dog will come your way soon enough, have patience. :fingerscr

Lucky Rescue
September 23rd, 2005, 10:51 PM
I have never adopted an animal, most of my animals where strays. I'm alittle interested in what you have said above because my dog was a pitbull (she wasn't a stray I got her from a relative). How did they come to the conculsion that a pitbull was not for you?

This was the first dog I ever adopted too. All my other animals were dumped or found stray.

No one said a pit bull wasn't for me. The dog I did adopt is a pit bull!:)

I decided that as much as I wanted a cute little puppy (who doesn't?) that what I wanted and what was suitable for me were two different things. At that point in time, I had to face the fact that a peeing, chewing, crying puppy and all that work that goes with it was not going to work for me.

I see that you're in Vaudreuil. Are you looking for another pit bull?

Sorry to hijack this thread!!!!

Joey.E.CockersMommy
September 23rd, 2005, 11:58 PM
Sjat,
I am sorry you didnt get your dog, I think the SPCA in Montreal did the right thing. We adopted a malamute husky from our local shelter about 7 years ago no questions asked they just gave him to us and asked us for the $42 adoption fee. We made a mistake adopting him in the first place our fault totally, but I can I let you know from our mistake honestly, having a husky in a regular size house with a regular sized yard is a lot of work it would be even harder in an apartment. In the end he ended up to be to much for us and we actually rehomed him (sucessfully)

We went back to the SPCA later just so the kids could see the dogs and they would have again send any dog home with us. Dogs seem to get adopted quickly at our SPCA but to right owners who knows I often see the same dog returned a few weeks later.

We have another dog now that is much more suited to our situation. In the end it ended up in a more suitable situation its just to bad he wasnt there in the beginning.

Take your time the right dog will come.

BellaMJ
September 24th, 2005, 02:11 AM
Hi sjat
I know how you feel well my son went through what you are going through. He always wanted a Lab but because he lived in apartment they turned him down too. My son recently bought a house, so now he is looking forward to adopt a Lab. I am sure you'll find your soul mate LOL. Did you go to the SPCA today? They usually dont care about your living situtation and dont know squat about dogs etc.

[QUOTE=Joey.E.CockersMommy]Sjat,
I am sorry you didnt get your dog, I think the SPCA in Montreal did the right thing. QUOTE]
Joey it wasnt the SPCA that turned her down it was anoth adoption shelter.
Because like I just mention SPCA would just be happy to get rid of the dog.

Anyways Sjat goodluck, Oh and maybe I might see you at Monteregie tomorrow since I am looking for Lab for my son :p

huskypup
September 24th, 2005, 07:33 AM
Im sorry you a disapointed at not being able to adopt Alaska - I believe the shelter has made the right decision. I have two siberian huskies - and can tell you they would be terrible in an apartment - they love to be out doors - Lucca will quite willingly lie outside all the time - if he was allowed, Mia loves the sunshine, they are very big, very boistrous and extremeley inquisitive - on the other hand they have the attention span of a gnat and get bored easily. The shedding fur is a nightmare - but I love them to bits, I have had huskies for 15 years (adopted and bought). I have a huge garden were they can run, they are also wonderful and climbing over fences and love to dig (thought I have been very lucky - they save that for when they go into kennels when I go on holiday).

There is a baby out there for you - one that is suited to living in an apartment.

Joey.E.CockersMommy
September 24th, 2005, 10:46 AM
=BellamjJoey it wasnt the SPCA that turned her down it was anoth adoption shelter

My apologies....we went and looked at some pups and dogs at the SPCA there was one we saw that we thought was adorable and seemed to have a really nice disposition.Our only criteria was to have a fenced yard. We thought we would go home and think about it and do some research on the breed which was apparently maybe a mix of cattle dog, border collie and husky the SPCA wasnt really sure. In the end we decided against it not a good mix for us she was also taken from her mother at about 6 weeks too.

That same dog and her litter made both got adopted a few days after we looked at them, her brother was returned about three weeks later. He was the more aggressive of the two of them, right away I knew he would be to much for us, I would imagine it may be why he was returned in the first place.

Yes the SPCA will adopt out easily but its important to do your own research don't just see a dog and take him home.

We were turned down on the English Cocker Spaniel list rescue for a dog, because we had young kids we waited about three weeks to found out about this dog and to be told no. It was a dissapointment but what if they had sent us this dog that wasnt good with young kids. That would be a bad situation for us and for the rescue.

Sorry to blab, but the right dog will come.http://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/dogbreeds/index.html

I like this sight I think it gives a really honest opinion of the different breeds and even the mixed breed is mentioned here. :)

SpanielLuver
September 24th, 2005, 04:36 PM
Please let me reiterate once again that this couple were not turned down to adopt. They have neither been accepted or rejected as they have not yet applied to adopt any dog. Its important to remember this when responding to the posts.

They saw a picture on our website that is all, and called for information on the process of how to adopt.

twinmommy
September 24th, 2005, 09:33 PM
As an afterthought, I think that any rescue who refuses to place a husky in an apt is not only reputable but is doing you a BIG FAVOR!!!

My sister has a husky in a small apt.

He has eaten 4 couches.
He's destroyed family pictures.
He's shredded birthcertificates and passports.

not to mention clothes, shoes, 1 leather jacket, 1 ski suit.

not to mention the vet visits that followed these episodes.

and that's aside from all the times he's escaped!!!!! :eek: :eek:

it's not about the material stuff, but a great experience sours quickly when the dog is not in his proper "niche".
I would respect their opinion and trust them with finding you a great pet.

Joey.E.CockersMommy
September 24th, 2005, 09:35 PM
Spaniel lover=

I am the one who spoke with your husband last night. He was not told NO for Alaska for the reason that you live in an apartment, but it was explained that she had been tried in an apartment situation and she did not do well.

I am sorry I was under the impression that they were turned down for this particular dog, because their situation was not suitable for it. I was only trying to relate a personal experience to the OP, and how people are turned down for certain dogs because the shelters/rescues /foster homes or owners don't see it has a good fit and how in the end it is for the best even though it is dissapointing at first to be told no. Which IMO is how a shelter should be run.

Prin
September 25th, 2005, 01:06 AM
Please let me reiterate once again that this couple were not turned down to adopt. They have neither been accepted or rejected as they have not yet applied to adopt any dog. Its important to remember this when responding to the posts.

They saw a picture on our website that is all, and called for information on the process of how to adopt.
I am the one who spoke with your husband last night. He was not told NO for Alaska for the reason that you live in an apartment, but it was explained that she had been tried in an apartment situation and she did not do well.

I don't mean to cause trouble, but in one post, you say they were told "No" for this dog, but then you say they have not been rejected, that they were not turned down? I don't get it.

I understand why you would turn them down, but don't do it and say you didn't if you did. You know what I mean?

sjat24
September 25th, 2005, 03:01 AM
MY God this thread seems to never end!

All I wanted to say is that I was diappointed that my chances were slim to none to get ALASKA( a Husky/LAB mix BTW), based on my living arrangments (ex:apartment/condo), which most likely played a major part of not getting her.

As for the experience, sure I never owned a dog but its not like I have never been around any. I have not had a child as of yet either but does that mean I can never give birth to one because of my lack of experience. I must start somewhere.

I know people are concerned about the well being of all dogs (which is great) but who is to say that a specific breed will or will not adapt to life in an apartment or even a house for that matter.

In my opinion it may depend all on the love and care of the owner of the dog and not so much on the living arrangment.

That is all i have to say and I hope this thread ends here.

SpanielLuver
September 26th, 2005, 02:20 PM
Prin, I suggest you re-read the quotes. I did not say I said they were told NO. If you read the post it says they were not told no.

They have neither been accepted or rejected as they have not applied to adopt. so therefore they could not have been turned down. They called for information which they received.

Its unfortunate the whole link was added naming the rescue, otherwise I would not have responded, but we all the damage that can be done to rescues.

To sjat24:
You are quite right to have to start somewhere, but with the right dog for your situation. As I said you and your husband are more than welcome to come meet us, to meet the dogs to hang out with us at the dog run for a while, to talk to the other fosters, etc. How did it go at the SPCA, did you manage to find one that would be a suitable fit?

Prin
September 26th, 2005, 02:32 PM
Thank YOU! I knew it was me. :)