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New to this forum & need help!

Arose863
September 23rd, 2005, 07:53 AM
Hi, I just discoverd this forum and I am in need of major help. We adopted a 2 year old Greyhound off the racetrack. Her name is Emma & she is s sweet funny dog.

The only problems we are having & they are big ones are seperation anxiety & all of a sudden in the past week spite peeing, she just did it this morning after her walk, she was locked out of the bedroom because I was sick and was still sleeping, my partner was in the living room with her & she just went! Any advice on this matter? Thanks

BMDLuver
September 23rd, 2005, 08:12 AM
How long have you had her for? Has she been checked by a vet for a UTI? Is she spayed? More information generally helps everyone to give you better advice. :)

Welcome to the board!

Lucky Rescue
September 23rd, 2005, 09:55 AM
Hi! Welcome, and thanks for adopting a greyhound!:)

Greyhounds usually have never spent one second of their lives alone, so it's more difficult for some of them to learn to be alone.

For the peeing, first do as BMDluver suggests, and have her checked for a bladder infection.

If she's okay, you need to get a big crate for her for when you can't watch her. Racing greyhounds are used to spending most of their lives caged and are used to it. They are also used to living on a strict and unchanging schedule, so try and do the same thing with her at the same time every day - walks, feeding, playtime, etc. This will make her feel more secure.

These dogs have never been in a home situation. Everything is strange and new to them and you must have patience and take it slowly with giving her more freedom in the house. As she gains confidence, you can allow her access to other parts of the house.

She is not being "spiteful".She is no doubt confused and unsure. Kindness, love and consistancy will do the trick!:)

TobsterMom
September 23rd, 2005, 09:58 AM
Hey there! First of.....YAY for adopting a Greyhound!!! We've actually been considering it for some time, I love those sweeties!

So first I would rule out any health problems, as mentioned. I would then contact Greyhound rescue. If you did get her from rescue, they generally are happy to provide you with support, and are very, very experienced in this special breed and all the things that go along with them! They would pobably give you the best advice. Racing Greyhounds are pretty new to just about everything and not used to any sort of homelife, it sometimes takes a long time and lot's of support, but they're pretty smart and catch on pretty easy!

Good luck!

StaceyB
September 23rd, 2005, 10:28 AM
Dogs don't pee out of spite. There is another reason why this is happening that you haven't figured out yet. Explain your reasons for thinking this and I will help you to determine why it is happening. Just because your dog is an adult doesn't mean that he/she knows all the rules. A greyhounds life racing has been very different than most dogs. With many you need to start from scratch.

Arose863
September 23rd, 2005, 10:38 AM
Thank you for all your responses.

Some more on Emma. We adopted her in July, this is our second Greyhound, our first having gone to the rainbow bridge in early May.

Emma was doing ok when we got her, she would stay in the crate when we went out and was generally quiet. She is a barker which I know is unusual for Greyhounds. As time progressed she has gotten worse with being alone, she will bark the minute we walk out the door and will not stop until we get back.

The peeing started last week and she has been tested for any infection, there is none. She was peeing when we let her out of the crate, in the bedroom, we blocked off the bedroom & she peed on the terrace, we blocked off the terrace & she peed on the far side of the living room while we were having dinner.

I have been home sick from work this week & monday morning she peed on the floor right in front of me. Today she peed when she came back from her walk, I was sleeping and my partner walked her & after the walk she closed the bedroom door so I could sleep, that is when Emma peed.

We hav an appiontment for a behaviorist to come on October 5th. Emma is also being treated with Clomacalm which I do not want to leave her on

BMDLuver
September 23rd, 2005, 11:01 AM
There is an alternative on the market now that is natural called Biocalm. Several of us have seen good results with it and it doesn't make the dog spaced out like Clomacalm does. It's available through vet's only at the moment. Sorry, I have not other suggestions for the peeing.

spectra2516
October 11th, 2005, 11:27 PM
We got our Greyhound over a year ago. We were told they did not get along with other dogs of another breed. (Must have been a racial thing.) Whitey ( Greyhound) made a couple of messes in the house but with stern correction ( DO NOT HIT AN ANIMAL) and a snoot full of smell and point to door commands, He now wakes anyone up to go out and I do mean he WILL wake you up. He also had a snapping problem! Well, after he snapped at our Angel (24 lb cockerspaniel also saved from kennel) we put him face to face with his new roomie and kept them together for about 2 hrs, supervised of course, Whitey got the message. Only when he sleeps will he snap at her but they are always together now. You can not walk one without the other crying to go with you. YOU need to work with a Greyhound closely. He sleeps beside the bed and will stay on our right side at all times. You need to praise them a lot and talk to them in a gentle or normal voice. They will come around and be your best shadow. They are very independent but when you first get one you need to show them everything! This means walking them untill they do their duty's and then as time goes on they will go out only when you want. They will tell you when they need you to bring them out. Greyhounds will take a piece of your clothes and lay with it for security. This helps them to feel wanted also.

StaceyB
October 11th, 2005, 11:48 PM
Spectra: Are you suggesting that they rub the dogs nose in it?

Arose: Does she have a clear method of telling you she needs out to the washroom? Does everyone in the home let her out. If she is usually let out by one person and they are not available such as you in the bedroom with the door closed and if her messages are not clear, she will only ask until she can no longer hold it and just go. Having an accident in front of someone usually just means that she is not afraid of you seeing her which means that she hasn't been in trouble before for having an accident. This is actually a good thing, otherwise she would just hide and do it.

In many cases you need to treat and train an adopted greyhound like you have a new puppy that has not learned any household skills yet. You may need to start from scratch. Don't give her freedom in the home until she has proven she is ready.

Prin
October 12th, 2005, 12:12 AM
Whitey ( Greyhound) made a couple of messes in the house but with stern correction ( DO NOT HIT AN ANIMAL) and a snoot full of smell and point to door commands, He now wakes anyone up to go out and I do mean he WILL wake you up. He also had a snapping problem! Well, after he snapped at our Angel (24 lb cockerspaniel also saved from kennel) we put him face to face with his new roomie and kept them together for about 2 hrs, supervised of course, Whitey got the message. Only when he sleeps will he snap at her but they are always together now.Spectra: Wow, you're really forceful with your greyhound! These guys have had very difficult lives and I feel so sorry for him that he ended up in a "my way or the highway" kind of home. Sorry if that's harsh, but "rubbing their nose in it" is a HUMILIATING practice from the 70's, and you should really NEVER EVER do that. Of course, Spectra, he'll wake you up- he is probably terrified of you. And I'm really not surprised that the dog started snapping after this.

There are a LOT of ways to abuse a dog, not just by hitting it. Seriously, you need to update your training principles. Please!! :fingerscr

StaceyB
October 12th, 2005, 01:31 AM
I had assumed that all greyhound rescue organizations picked matching homes for the temperment of each of the rescues like if the dog doesn't like other dogs, he won't be placed in a family with them, or cats/children. They do this so that the dog has the best chance on remaining there for their lifetime.

Trinitie
October 12th, 2005, 09:14 AM
Dogs don't pee out of spite. There is another reason why this is happening that you haven't figured out yet.Both of these statements can be considered true.

I have met with, and have seen it take place, owners whose dogs "spite" pee. There is no barking, no indication of separation anxiety, the dog has been put out and emptied itself just prior to the people leaving. Yet, as soon as the door is closed, bam. Pee and poop. Then when the owner comes home (opens the door) the dog treats them in an indifferent fashion. Only when the dog knows the owner isn't going out again does it greet them in a friendly way.

For the most part its a form of dominance in a case like this (this particular dog thinks its better than a lower member of the pack and it should go along). For your dog I'd definately say it's separation anxiety. High strung animals that don't like to be left alone, especially ones that have spent most of thier time around people. Try crating the dog, leaving a radio on, or a tv, and cover the crate a little so the dog isn't so spooked. Use a lightweight material so the dog doesn't overheat.

StaceyB
October 12th, 2005, 10:10 AM
Think about what exactly spite is, it is actually quite complex. It would include a plan, execution, and a thought to prove a point.
Your friends dog may have been more active than usual if the dog had not been crated and had the run of the house, may have become excited by the family before they left or someone coming to the door while they were gone. Unless the dog was filmed there would be no way of telling if the dog went as soon as they left. If the dog had the accident just before they arrived home and the dog has been in trouble for going inside it would explain the behaviour. More often it is due to their person seeing the accident and showing something in their body language that shows that they are upset. It could have been as simple as you shrugging your shoulders or letting out a deep breath. The dog wouldn't know that you were upset at them, all they know is that you are upset and are not having any part of it. This is when you see the ears go back, tail between legs and scoot out of the room. If some time had passed the dog would have gone and went on with their day and not think of it again. Dogs are in the moment.

Trinitie
October 12th, 2005, 02:41 PM
Actually, they did film thier dog. An animal behaviourist suggested they do that so they know what's happening when they leave the dog. It was quite clear that the dog watched them leave the house, without any fuss whatsoever, close the door, and he just sat there. He waited a minute, stood up, walked over to the area of the floor in front of thier favorite chair, and peed. He then sat there a minute, looked at the door, and walked over to another area (in plain sight) and pooped. All this happened within 15 minutes of them leaving the house.

Dogs may be "in the moment" for almost all things in thier lives, but how does one explain dogs who feel shy or ashamed of a haircut they don't like? Or other strange, unexplainable, behaviour?

There are some animals that are well beyond humans when it comes to emotions, thinking, or just plain reacting to stimuli.

The dog mentioned by the OP is most likely showing signs of separation anxiety, and can be controlled by using the most gentle of hands, and not fussing over the dog when coming or going. Eventually the dog will learn that them leaving is not a life-altering thing, and that they're coming back home.

Prin
October 12th, 2005, 10:53 PM
Dogs may be "in the moment" for almost all things in thier lives, but how does one explain dogs who feel shy or ashamed of a haircut they don't like? Or other strange, unexplainable, behaviour?
The haircut is easy. If the dog feels naked and unprotected in the wrong areas (see CF's Chloe pics :p ) then the dog is bound to feel less secure and therefore, more submissive or shy...

That said, I believe that dogs are wayyyy more complex than we give them credit for. If you look into a bored dog's eyes, they shift around like a human's would when the human is thinking. I can't imagine that my doggies don't think, and I often wonder how they are thinking. Do they have language in their thoughts? Or is it just activity? We see by the muffled barking in their dreams that their dreams have communication involved, but how does that reflect on thought? Those are my doggy questions. How will we ever know? We can't communicate well enough with them.

StaceyB
October 13th, 2005, 12:21 AM
I do believe that dogs have more complex thought process and emotions than we give credit for. I don't think that they think about vanity or plan and execute plans intended to offend. Dogs do however do whatever they can that benefits them and they are excellent problem solvers. They learn very quickly what they can get away with.

If dogs are as smart as some people think they are then why in the world would someone ever do the things that are often done for training purposes.

Trinitie
October 13th, 2005, 10:34 AM
I agree with you Stacey. Most people don't give dogs enough credit.

I think, but don't know for certain, that training is done for the benefit of humans. The majority of training is already something the dog knows. "Sit", "Down", "Paw", "Speak". These are all things the dog would do on its own, without man asking them to do it. Things like "drug sniffing", "sit up and beg", or other new talents, are things that man wants the dog to learn.

At puppy class, my little Ruby is wonderful. She can Sit, Down, Paw, Follow, Stay (sort of), Come, and other little tidbits. These are all things that she does naturally, but I've given treats at the right time, enforcing the word associated with the action. Now she can do these things on command (for food of course!).

I wonder, too, why we train dogs to do what they do naturally. The only things I would think are needed are "outside for potty", so we're not swimming in our own homes, and "hush" so we don't keep the aspirin company in gravy.

StaceyB
October 13th, 2005, 10:39 AM
I am referring more to aversive techniques, maybe this is why training has went in the positive direction.

Trinitie
October 13th, 2005, 11:25 AM
Ah, yes. I misunderstood. I completely agree with you!

I wish the OP would post back and let us know how things are with thier pup.

StaceyB
October 13th, 2005, 11:47 AM
Yes it would be nice. I imagine she is having quite a difficult time especially if she is comparing how it was with her first greyhound vs this new one with some issues.

spectra2516
October 21st, 2005, 04:06 AM
Spectra: Wow, you're really forceful with your greyhound! These guys have had very difficult lives and I feel so sorry for him that he ended up in a "my way or the highway" kind of home. Sorry if that's harsh, but "rubbing their nose in it" is a HUMILIATING practice from the 70's, and you should really NEVER EVER do that. Of course, Spectra, he'll wake you up- he is probably terrified of you. And I'm really not surprised that the dog started snapping after this.

There are a LOT of ways to abuse a dog, not just by hitting it. Seriously, you need to update your training principles. Please!! :fingerscr

DO not feel sorry for my animals because they are so spoiled. Read what I actualy said! SHOW HIM WHAT HE DID WRONG AND TAKE HIM OUT! If you do not catch a dog in the act they wont know what they did wrong. You need to show them what they did so they know next time. As far as the snapping ,again read what was said. We got him with battle scars from other dogs and showed him that the other dog was a friendly dog. Do not missunderstand what is said. We do not yell or hit our animals we teach them.

Prin
October 21st, 2005, 12:11 PM
Sorry, I must have misunderstood this: a snoot full of smell for "rub his nose in it".

StaceyB
October 23rd, 2005, 01:00 PM
If you don't catch them in the act there is little you can do with the accident other than clean it up and hope you catch them next time or execute a plan or change your routine to lessen the chances of more accidents.
When a dog has an accident, they go because they had to and then went on with their day. Showing them what they did even 5 minutes later will do nothing to help the situation.