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Scene Of Anarchy

heidiho
September 1st, 2005, 01:28 PM
NEW ORLEANS, Louisiana (CNN) -- Boat rescues in some areas of flooded out New Orleans have been curtailed because of violence, officials said Thursday.

"There are isolated incidents where security has become an issue for our rescue efforts but only isolated incidents. FEMA is not suspending operations," said Natalie Rule of the Federal Emergency Management Agency in Washington.

The Coast Guards also said it is avoiding areas where there are reports of gunfire.

"We're having to hold off going in until we're assured that the areas are safe to transit," said USCG Lt. Cmdr. Jeffrey Carter. "We're following the lead of FEMA on that."

He added, "We're not shut down. There's a wide area where we're still doing rescues. There's still plenty of people out there."

Troops and police have been working to evacuate tens of thousands of people displaced by Hurricane Katrina, who are growing weaker and more desperate each hour. (Watch report on the desperate conditions at the convention center -- 2:54 )

Thousands of people have been sleeping on streets, interstate access ramps, bridges or any dry spot they can find.

Outside the New Orleans Convention Center, a huge crowd waited on the sidewalks for aid that could be a long time coming. The building was used as a secondary shelter when the Louisiana Superdome was overwhelmed.

CNN's Chris Lawrence reported that conditions inside the building were appalling -- a number of bodies were visible, including a baby.

"We are out here like pure animals. We don't have any help," Rev. Issac Clark told the Associated Press.

As reports indicated a mounting death toll in New Orleans, U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu said that "we understand there are thousands of dead people" in Louisiana, according to media reports.

Evacuation points swamped with people
A Louisiana National Guard official told CNN Thursday morning that between 50,000 and 60,000 people had converged at evacuation points near the Louisiana Superdome hoping to get on one of the buses out of town.

"It's no longer just evacuees from the Superdome, as citizens who were holed up in high-rise office buildings and hotels saw buses moving into the dome, they realized this is an evacuation point," Lt. Col. Pete Schneider of the Louisiana National Guard said.

He said there were reports that several small trash fires were burning around the building and firefighters were having a hard time reaching the area. (Watch report on violence delaying evacuation -- 1:51)

Houston has offered to house about 25,000 people in the Astrodome. San Antonio, Texas, has agreed to take another 25,000 people, officials said Thursday. Schneider said that officials were looking for additional locations.

Widespread looting and random gunfire have been reported across the city. Police told CNN that groups of armed men roamed the streets overnight.

Officers told CNN they lacked manpower and steady communications to properly do their jobs -- and that they needed help to prevent the widespread looting and violence now prevalent in the city.

A police officer working in downtown New Orleans said police were siphoning gas from abandoned vehicles in an effort to keep their squad cars running, CNN's Chris Lawrence reported.

The officer said police are "on their own" for food and water, scrounging up what they can from anybody who is generous enough to give them some -- and that they have no communication whatsoever. Police also told CNN they were removing ammunition from looted gunshops in an effort to get it off the streets.

President Bush, in an interview on ABC's "Good Morning America," said that their should be "zero tolerance of people breaking the law during an emergency such as this."

He promised a rapid federal response to the disaster.

Pentagon officials said Wednesday the governors of Louisiana and Mississippi have ordered the mobilization of an additional 10,000 National Guard troops to provide security and help with hurricane relief. (See video on Pentagon response -- 2:14)

Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco said Wednesday that she was "just furious" about the lawlessness.

"We'll do what it takes to bring law and order to our region," she said.

The head of Acadian Ambulance Service, Richard Zuschlag, said Wednesday that a generator was stolen from his command center and an ambulance was tipped over as his workers tried to evacuate hospitals. (Full story)

Mississippi death toll rising
The breadth of the brutality of Hurricane Katrina became clearer as more death toll figures began to filter in from Mississippi's coastal region.

Authorities said at least 185 people died in Monday's Category 4 storm.

In Hancock County alone, Sheriff Eddie Jennings put the death toll at 85, with 60 people dead in Pearlington, 22 in Waveland, two in Bay St. Louis and one body that had washed up on the beach.

In neighboring Harrison County, which is home to Gulfport and Biloxi, authorities reported 100 bodies had been found, an emergency official in the state capital, Jackson, told CNN.

Power out; gas prices rising
Electricity was out for more than 2.3 million people in Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama and Florida.

Meanwhile, Katrina's effect on oil supplies and gas prices spread nationwide, prompting the White House to tap the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

News of disruptions in the gas supply sparked runs on stations and a sharp spike in prices, with some drivers in Atlanta, Georgia, facing prices above $5 a gallon. (Economic impact)

The operators of two key pipelines that carry fuel out of the region announced Thursday that they were resuming limited operations.

In New Orleans, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was using helicopters to drop 15,000-pound sandbags into breaches in the city's levee system -- the first step in trying to control the flooding that submerged most of the city. (See video on levee repairs -- 3:53)

The flow of water into New Orleans from Lake Pontchartrain finally abated, Corps officials said. But engineers won't begin trying to pump out the water until the breaches are plugged. (Recovery efforts)

Copyright 2005 CNN. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Associated Press contributed to this report.


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heidiho
September 1st, 2005, 01:30 PM
I cannot believe 80% of New Orleans is under water,.....

StaceyB
September 1st, 2005, 01:38 PM
I can't believe that more people are going to lose their lives because people won't stop stealing. They are sending 1500 police to drop the rescue and deal with this. That is just saying to all of us that an object is more important than a life.

heidiho
September 1st, 2005, 01:40 PM
I can understand stealing food and water,i just cant believe this happened

Roxy's_MA
September 1st, 2005, 01:50 PM
Yes, those people affected will need all the support they can get. It is so devestating. :sad: I cannot imagine losing my home, job, everything in a storm. I have heard of some fundraisers already to help these people in crisis, we should all do what we can to help out.

Dog Dancer
September 1st, 2005, 01:53 PM
It's totally unbelievable what's happened! It's shocking and devastating to watch the news reports, yet I can't take my eyes off it. I get sick when I hear hotels in neighbouring areas are charging $200 a night to evacuees :mad: My heart breaks for all those who are suffering and I know that in a moment it could be any of us. I don't think of stealing food and water and even clothing and shoes as theft right now, more a matter of survival - but people hauling off TV's? What's with that? Where you going to plug that in fella??? I have no compasion for those folks. Lord help these people, it's so hard to watch and will go on for so long to get it sorted out. :sad:

Blaze01
September 1st, 2005, 02:07 PM
Now I feel guilty for bit*hing about gas prices...these people will be in my prayers and I hope all of yalls...

Dogastrophe
September 1st, 2005, 02:16 PM
I can't believe that more people are going to lose their lives because people won't stop stealing. They are sending 1500 police to drop the rescue and deal with this. That is just saying to all of us that an object is more important than a life.

The problem that they are having is that rescuers/police/Nat Guard are being shot at, other ppl are being killed. Why risk going into an area to help ppl if a subset of the ppl you are trying to help are willing to kill you for it?

Karin
September 1st, 2005, 03:34 PM
It is a total mayhem situation. The people trying to rescue others are being shot at.
Thousands of people are trying to get out, thousands are trying to get in to help. There are no instant cures. This does take time.
Three days after Frances hit last year I and many others were getting desperate. No food, water, ice...hope. Add the 100 degrees outside in the shade. Times this by millions from Katrina the witch.

Everything that can be done is being done..if a snap of a finger would fix it, this too would be done. Time and prayers....

Florida has opened shelters across the state too. Many people from the "ground zero" gulf coast were here on vacation at the attractions or for other reasons and cannot go home, many have no homes left anyway. Georgia is opening shelters too.

This is the worse natural disaster to hit in the us in my lifetime, scary enough..it could happen anywhere, anytime.

Mind boggling...

heidiho
September 1st, 2005, 04:06 PM
It really is mind boggling and the fact that they are below sea level is crazy

melanie
September 1st, 2005, 06:05 PM
its jsut appaling, all that loss and tradgedy and ppl are carrying on like that, its shameful really. to think that their actions may hurt someone, its jsut sick, those ppl have been through enough really, its jsut not darn fair... :mad:

its been really sad watching this on tv, between this tradgedy, the tradgedy in iraq, and china it all jsut stinks and is so unfair on all these ppl....

i hope things get better real soon for everyone.... :o

twodogsandacat
September 1st, 2005, 10:57 PM
Amongst the bad is much good. That is what will make the difference. In the words of Bill Clinton “there is nothing wrong with America that can’t be fixed by what is right with America”. :usa:

They will pull together to do what needs to be done. Canada and other countries have offered to help and hopefully the help will arrive quickly.

The questions of how well or how ill prepared they were as well as the blame can be taken care of later.

Rick C
September 1st, 2005, 11:27 PM
It looks like a rescue being run by a bunch of Crackers, no slight intended to that portion of the USA.

The resources are there but its quite apparent there is no serviceable disaster plan at the local, state or even FEMA level, a plan that would have pre-prioritized what should be done and what resources should be committed to each task.

How can you have the FEMA director finding out on Day Three on CNN from a television guy that there were thousands of refugees at the New Orleans convention center?

That's appalling. How would he not know that on day three?

How is it even helicopter assets hadn't been allocated to deliver something as basic as water and some form of communication to the major hospitals in the area? Didn't it occur to someone that they didn't know what was happening at hospitals and didn't it occur to them to send one (1) helicopter over to ask? Wow.

People have their hearts in the right place but there is an appalling lack of leadership among those organizing the effort.

Another major mistake was not issuing shoot-to-kill orders for looters on day one. That merely emboldened the majority who might have sat on the sidelines if they'd seen a few being shot in the opening hours . . . . and now anarchy reigns.

I see on the news tonight that a unit of the Arkansas National Guard is setting up in New Orleans with those shoot-to-kill orders finally in their jeans.

It'll eventually sort itself out but this is turning into a classic case of what not to do in this kind of a disaster.

My thoughts.

Rick C
www.goldentales.ca

Karin
September 1st, 2005, 11:52 PM
It looks like a rescue being run by a bunch of Crackers, no slight intended to that portion of the USA.

The resources are there but its quite apparent there is no serviceable disaster plan at the local, state or even FEMA level, a plan that would have pre-prioritized what should be done and what resources should be committed to each task.

How can you have the FEMA director finding out on Day Three on CNN from a television guy that there were thousands of refugees at the New Orleans convention center?

That's appalling. How would he not know that on day three?

How is it even helicopter assets hadn't been allocated to deliver something as basic as water and some form of communication to the major hospitals in the area? Didn't it occur to someone that they didn't know what was happening at hospitals and didn't it occur to them to send one (1) helicopter over to ask? Wow.

People have their hearts in the right place but there is an appalling lack of leadership among those organizing the effort.

Another major mistake was not issuing shoot-to-kill orders for looters on day one. That merely emboldened the majority who might have sat on the sidelines if they'd seen a few being shot in the opening hours . . . . and now anarchy reigns.

I see on the news tonight that a unit of the Arkansas National Guard is setting up in New Orleans with those shoot-to-kill orders finally in their jeans.

It'll eventually sort itself out but this is turning into a classic case of what not to do in this kind of a disaster.

My thoughts.

Rick C
www.goldentales.ca


Put yourself in that position. On one hand people are are a roof, needing to be rescued, in the same field you see looters...you make the choice.

Appalling? ...Over 3 thousand have been rescued so far. The dead are left behind just as pets are. That's in NOLA only..

Believe the media. That's a big goof.

I am a cracker born and raised. We are not at fault for what mother nature gives us. The Canadians always want to blame someone eh?

Excuse me Marko...the boundries have been crossed. I thought I was tough enough but I can't like this anymore. When things get tough, let's kick them some more attitude.

Americans are not welcome here.

Prin
September 1st, 2005, 11:56 PM
I think we also forget that the rescuers that were first on the scene were also victims of everything too! Not too many humans would be able to do that- experience enormous fear, suffer huge losses, deal with the same uncertainty as everybody else, AND rescue people, AND catch looters? Barely human. Superheros.

twodogsandacat
September 2nd, 2005, 12:01 AM
Couldn’t agree more Rick. The system failed. Still there are many heroes doing what little they can.

I agree that looting is wrong and those willing to do it are probably not the most upstanding citizens anyways but let’s hope common sense prevails with the National Guard.

My coop student said something interesting today. He told me he saw on the same web page pictures of a white couple ‘finding food’ and a picture of some black youths ‘looting food’. That ticked me off to no end.

Those shoot to kill orders should not include food, water or diapers but only CD, Stereos, TV, CD Players and the non-essentials.

Anyone firing or even pointing a gun at a Guardsman deserves what ever they get back from them.

twodogsandacat
September 2nd, 2005, 12:15 AM
I am a cracker born and raised. We are not at fault for what mother nature gives us. The Canadians always want to blame someone eh?

Excuse me Marko...the boundries have been crossed. I thought I was tough enough but I can't like this anymore. When things get tough, let's kick them some more attitude.

Americans are not welcome here.
Broadcast by Gordon Sinclair on June 5 1973

The Americans

The United States dollar took another pounding on German, French and British exchanges this morning, hitting the lowest point ever known in West Germany. It has declined there by 41% since 1971 and this Canadian thinks it is time to speak up for the Americans as the most generous and possibly the least-appreciated people in all the earth.

As long as sixty years ago, when I first started to read newspapers, I read of floods on the Yellow River and the Yangtse. Who rushed in with men and money to help? The Americans did.

They have helped control floods on the Nile, the Amazon, the Ganges and the Niger. Today, the rich bottom land of the Misssissippi is under water and no foreign land has sent a dollar to help. Germany, Japan and, to a lesser extent, Britain and Italy, were lifted out of the debris of war by the Americans who poured in billions of dollars and forgave other billions in debts. None of those countries is today paying even the interest on its remaining debts to the United States.

When the franc was in danger of collapsing in 1956, it was the Americans who propped it up and their reward was to be insulted and swindled on the streets of Paris. I was there. I saw it.

When distant cities are hit by earthquakes, it is the United States that hurries into help... Managua Nicaragua is one of the most recent examples. So far this spring, 59 American communities have been flattened by tornadoes. Nobody has helped.

The Marshall Plan .. the Truman Policy .. all pumped billions upon billions of dollars into discouraged countries. Now, newspapers in those countries are writing about the decadent war-mongering Americans.

I'd like to see one of those countries that is gloating over the erosion of the United States dollar build its own airplanes.

Come on... let's hear it! Does any other country in the world have a plane to equal the Boeing Jumbo Jet, the Lockheed Tristar or the Douglas 107? If so, why don't they fly them? Why do all international lines except Russia fly American planes? Why does no other land on earth even consider putting a man or women on the moon?

You talk about Japanese technocracy and you get radios. You talk about German technocracy and you get automobiles. You talk about American technocracy and you find men on the moon, not once, but several times ... and safely home again. You talk about scandals and the Americans put theirs right in the store window for everyone to look at. Even the draft dodgers are not pursued and hounded. They are here on our streets, most of them ... unless they are breaking Canadian laws .. are getting American dollars from Ma and Pa at home to spend here.

When the Americans get out of this bind ... as they will... who could blame them if they said 'the hell with the rest of the world'. Let someone else buy the Israel bonds, Let someone else build or repair foreign dams or design foreign buildings that won't shake apart in earthquakes.

When the railways of France, Germany and India were breaking down through age, it was the Americans who rebuilt them. When the Pennsylvania Railroad and the New York Central went broke, nobody loaned them an old caboose. Both are still broke. I can name to you 5,000 times when the Americans raced to the help of other people in trouble.

Can you name me even one time when someone else raced to the Americans in trouble? I don't think there was outside help even during the San Francisco earthquake.

Our neighbours have faced it alone and I am one Canadian who is damned tired of hearing them kicked around. They will come out of this thing with their flag high. And when they do, they are entitled to thumb their nose at the lands that are gloating over their present troubles.

I hope Canada is not one of these. But there are many smug, self-righteous Canadians. And finally, the American Red Cross was told at its 48th Annual meeting in New Orleans this morning that it was broke.

This year's disasters .. with the year less than half-over… has taken it all and nobody...but nobody... has helped

Rick C
September 2nd, 2005, 10:07 AM
Put yourself in that position. On one hand people are are a roof, needing to be rescued, in the same field you see looters...you make the choice.

Appalling? ...Over 3 thousand have been rescued so far. The dead are left behind just as pets are. That's in NOLA only..

Believe the media. That's a big goof.

I am a cracker born and raised. We are not at fault for what mother nature gives us. The Canadians always want to blame someone eh?

Excuse me Marko...the boundries have been crossed. I thought I was tough enough but I can't like this anymore. When things get tough, let's kick them some more attitude.

Americans are not welcome here.

Its easy to put yourself in that position.

You prioritize.

You don't delegate 100% of your helicopter resources to rescue hundreds when tens of thousands are at risk.

A disaster plan takes out the emotion of the moment and makes rational decisions, sacrificing some to save many, many more.

If you have 100 helicopters, you delegate 50 to pull people off roofs, you delegate 25 to deliver supplies and services to isolated high value locations in the city and the other 25 to service concentrations at designated places like the Superdome and the Convention Center.

You don't delegate 100 to save hundreds while chaos reigns and tens of thousands flounder. That speaks to a lack of leadership in making the tough calls.

The Mayor of New Orleans this morning said exactly what I had said above so no apology from myself. This has been a terribly uncoordinated rescue effort lacking the prioritization necessary to help the maximum number of people possible.

No one appears to be in charge and running it.

I also see this a.m. that GW Bush agreed with that sentiment.

This has nothing to do with you being an American or anyone else being a Canadian. You'll never get the problems solved if you fall into that pit rather than face the issue head on. Its an easy way out. Don't take it.

Rick C
www.goldentales.ca

Schwinn
September 2nd, 2005, 10:22 AM
I am a cracker born and raised. We are not at fault for what mother nature gives us. The Canadians always want to blame someone eh?



Actually, what Rick said has already been mostly said on all the AMERICAN news sources. He wasn't blaming Americans, he was blaming the politicians for what some feel was a poor response and allowing things to disolve into anarchy.

This is an open board, with open debate. No one is bashing Americans here. Nothing has been said about the US that hasn't been said about Canada before. I guess we could ask for some sort of policy where, from now on, all posts must begin with hugs and kisses, and everyone else must reply with agreements?

I'm not saying I agree (or disagree) with Rick, but I come to the off-topic forum from time to time for discussion and debate. We've already seen people getting spanked for flaming, slandering, and generally being poopy towards one another, so I think some people need to either lighten up or stay away from the topics that they are too sensitive to handle. It isn't always hugs and tickles in here.

Rick C
September 2nd, 2005, 10:33 AM
For interest, the Mayor of New Orleans this morning flaming federal disaster officials:

“They don't have a clue what's going on down there,” Mayor Ray Nagin told WWL-AM Thursday night. "Excuse my French everybody in America but I am pissed.”

http://edition.cnn.com/2005/US/09/02/katrina.nagin/index.html

And Bush today:

Bush, before leaving the White House, told reporters that “the results are not acceptable” — a blunt criticism of federal efforts so far, particularly at the New Orleans Convention Center where thousands are stranded even though the site is easily accessible by vehicles.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9156612/

Rick C
www.goldentales.ca

DogueLover
September 2nd, 2005, 11:08 AM
I have watched the news reports and I am just baffled by the differences in human nature.
There were numerous warnings about the hurricane, days before it hit, and yet, when the opportunity to leave presented itself, they sat and did nothing. The people sat and waited until they could see for themselves that it was not a good idea to weather it out.
Is it just me or does anyone else see this as strange? Even if you live in poverty you have to heed the warnings and find some way out, Before the storm is upon you.
Now they are in utter chaos, and although the rescue efforts are a joke, I do not understand why the violence is so widespread, can`t people just realize that there are priorities........... maybe instead of taking the electronics and other crap they could be taking food, water and medical supplies.......... and helping those around them..... I just don`t get it.
Here in our small town, we had a tornado rip through and cause extensive damage, the power was out, we had limited water supply( but everyone had bottled water in case something happened), we had NO warning of the tornado, but there were severe storm warnings. In the aftermath the people of our community all worked together, in the pitch blackness, going with vehicles, flashlights, and offered help to those people who had been hit the hardest by the storm.
By noon the next day ( the storm hit at 11:15 pm) there were people out with chainsaws, rakes, shovels and any form of help they could use to clean up yards, streets and homes. By supper time you would not have known how badly the damage had been by the look of the town.
I realize this is not comparable to what has happened in Louisianna but why the violence and looting? Why not do what you can to help those who need it? Is there really that much of a difference in our countries?
Call me sheltered but my Heavens, what is wrong with people? :confused:

Rick C
September 2nd, 2005, 11:37 AM
Potential looters and bullies are in your community right now. Take out the police and watch what would happen. They might be living right beside you as we speak.

I think it was the former police chief of New York City who, a few days ago, put the number at 10% of a population who could be expected to do the things you're seeing in an area where there is an authority vacuum.

Its not something particular to New Orleans.

Rick C
www.goldentales.ca

Schwinn
September 2nd, 2005, 11:52 AM
I don't think it's an issue with a difference between countries. Look at the riots that happened in Detroit when they won the World Series. It was said, "That would never happen here!" And when Toronto won, it was a big love-fest. But then when Montreal won the Stanley Cup, there were riots.

No, I'm afraid, idiots are idigneous to both countries.

I say it's time to enact martial law. Whether you think the city should have been better prepared or not, I don't think anyone forsaw the rescue helicopters being used for target practice. This is disgusting, and my heart breaks for the innocent victims. They played the full interview of the man who had to let go of his wife as she said, "You can't save me. Take care of the children". I had tears in my eyes as I was driving to work. I'm flying to Thunder Bay to see Cheryl and Gracie this weekend. First thing I'm doing is giving them both a big hug.

jjgeonerd
September 2nd, 2005, 12:00 PM
Keep in mind that everything you are seeing is on the news. They tend to sensationalize things.

A member on my motorcycle board lives in New Orleans (Lakeview) and works for the local office of the Army Corps of Engineers. He has lost everything except for his family, a duffel bag full of clothes and his pickup.

He has been reporting that the looting is not as bad as what the news is showing. Same thing with the violence. Most of the looting is for food and water...which is not looting IMO. The incidences of looting for TVs and such are pretty rare, but the news is focusing on them. He said all of the rescue workers he has talked to said there was no violence and people were just grateful to get help.

Just wanted to remind everyone to consider the information source for what is happening down there. There is violence and looting, but it is not the norm by any means. I trust info. from a real person over the news anyday!

As far as Bush complaining the federal response isn't good enough. Another reason I don't like him.

In early 2001, the Federal Emergency Management Agency issued a report stating that a hurricane striking New Orleans was one of the three most likely disasters in the U.S., including a terrorist attack on New York City. But by 2003 the federal funding for the flood control project essentially dried up as it was drained into the Iraq war. In 2004, the Bush administration cut funding requested by the New Orleans district of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for holding back the waters of Lake Pontchartrain by more than 80 percent. Additional cuts at the beginning of this year (for a total reduction in funding of 44.2 percent since 2001) forced the New Orleans district of the Corps to impose a hiring freeze. The Senate had debated adding funds for fixing New Orleans' levees, but it was too late.

Sidney Blumenthal, a former assistant and senior advisor to President Clinton and the author of "The Clinton Wars."

There are levees all over the US that are old and just waiting to collapse. Sacramento is another prime location where levees are in serious danger of collapsing...due to an earthquake.

jjgeonerd
September 2nd, 2005, 12:38 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2005/WEATHER/09/02/katrina.world/index.html

Interesting article on coutries offering the US help. Australia in particular seems to be doing the most, which is much appreciated. Even Sri Lanka donated some money...even though they were devastaded by the Tsunami.

Germany, France, and Japan have lost some respect in my eyes. Japan in particular probably has some of the best disaster response teams in the world. Too bad they are still there. The US routinely sends earthquake response and search and rescue teams to Japan after earthquakes.

Rick C
September 2nd, 2005, 12:44 PM
[QUOTE=jjgeonerd]Keep in mind that everything you are seeing is on the news. They tend to sensationalize things.

A member on my motorcycle board lives in New Orleans (Lakeview) and works for the local office of the Army Corps of Engineers. He has lost everything except for his family, a duffel bag full of clothes and his pickup.

He has been reporting that the looting is not as bad as what the news is showing. Same thing with the violence. Most of the looting is for food and water...which is not looting IMO. The incidences of looting for TVs and such are pretty rare, but the news is focusing on them. He said all of the rescue workers he has talked to said there was no violence and people were just grateful to get help.

Just wanted to remind everyone to consider the information source for what is happening down there. There is violence and looting, but it is not the norm by any means. I trust info. from a real person over the news anyday!

While I respect the view offered by your friend, it does seem to be rather unique.

Some other real people report their experiences in their own words in this story:

http://www.nydailynews.com/front/story/342814p-292596c.html

Also, a news story today on the pledge from the Government of Canada:

http://www.canada.com/calgary/calgaryherald/news/story.html?id=a85f6390-4496-4e6b-9805-04d9eb06a790

Rick C
www.goldentales.ca

jjgeonerd
September 2nd, 2005, 12:56 PM
He didn't say people weren't trapped or suffering...just that the looting and violence is not as widespread as the news makes it sound. He indicated their biggest fear is when the waters recede they will find hundreds of people in the attics of homes that either drowned or died from lack of water and food and exposure to the heat.

Glad to hear Canada is prepared to help...much appreciated! :thumbs up