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Reverse Sneezing?

Copper'sMom
August 11th, 2005, 01:07 PM
Has anyone heard of the term "reverse sneezing?" It sounds like snorting through the nose in short spurts and doesn't last long at all.

Can anyone elaborate on this??

Copper'sMom
August 11th, 2005, 01:21 PM
:o oops sorry people, I should have done a search BEFORE I posted!! lol

Anywho, Copper has been doing this reverse sneezing yesterday and today. He has done it before on occasion but never more than once or twice in a stretch of days, weeks and months!

I have also noticed he's been having eye boogers. Not the normal ones he gets but they are a little thicker looking.

I am worried because we are leaving tomorrow to go camping!! So after doing a search, maybe Benadryl would help if it is allergies?? And stroking his throat when he's having a fit? Someone mentioned foxtail(plant) - is it super common?? I'll search that too!

Copper has been going into alot of weeds out behind our shop lately. When he comes in he's covered with little white things(flowers??) that look like they would cause allergy symptoms!!

Any input from anyone??

Dog Dancer
August 11th, 2005, 01:32 PM
My Shadow does these on occasion, fortunately not too often. Halo not so much. But in your case it does sound like allergies with the eye boogers too. I tend to stroke Shadows throat when it happens mostly to try to calm her so she doesn't panic. Hers is not often enough to use Benadryl, but it would be worth a try to try and settle it. It's very distressing to me when the girls do it, I'm sure it kinda panics them too. :( It appears you must have found the info about this on this site already, it was very informative for me when I dug it up. Good luck.

Lucky Rescue
August 11th, 2005, 02:01 PM
Chloe gets the reverse sneezes a lot too - usually when she's very excited or after eating.

Apply very firm pressure on the throat to help stop the spasms. If that doesn't work, I put my fingers over Chloe's nostrils for about 3 or 4 seconds, after which she swallows and that can help stop it too.

Allergies in dogs normally manifest in itching, and not sneezing or other symptoms humans get.

SnowDancer
August 11th, 2005, 05:50 PM
My Eskimo also reverse sneezes - I do same as Lucky and DogDancer.

sarahandelvis
August 16th, 2005, 08:26 AM
Actually my Boston pup had severe snotty nose, goopy eyes, and sneezing from what I determined was a wheat allergy. And that's when he got his reverse sneezes too, it scared the crap out of me - he was so stuffed up I thought he was choking! And this was after I took him to my vet who was no help as to what could be causing it.

So from experience with my dog, I know they can get these types of symptoms from food, and the most common food allergy culprits are - wheat, corn, and dairy. It took me a week to find that out, fortunately someone told me that on a different message board I no longer log on to.

StaceyB
August 16th, 2005, 10:45 AM
Check out www.avcvet.com
Go to FAQ's, almost at the bottom of the list is one that says something like my dog makes a wierd gagging, snorting noise.

tenderfoot
August 16th, 2005, 11:17 AM
Occasionally one of our dogs will do the reverse sneeze spasms. We can actually tell them "quit" and they stop doing it. It's kind of like saying 'boo' to someone with the hiccups. Say it short and sharp.

Prin
August 16th, 2005, 11:37 AM
LOL tenderfoot!!! (When my doggy gets the hiccups, I just grab her paw really firmly- she growls and is so preoccupied with being a crabby that she forgets the hiccups...)

savannah
August 19th, 2005, 08:52 AM
My dog used to have this problem, as she is a brachecephalic breed (pekingese). She was having long episodes many times a day, and i felt that it really stressed her out -not to mention me. I spoke to my vet about it, and was referred to a specialist who saw videotape of her doing it, and they removed some of her soft palate, and enlarged her nostrils, and since that operation, she has not had a problem with breathing. I know the surgery is somewhat controversial, but looking back, i am 1 million % happy that i did it. Back then i researched it, and i did see that long term reverse sneezing could cause problems.
My new peke also has these problems in the heat, but with his age and infrequency of the attacks, we have decided not to get the surgery for him.

tenderfoot
September 6th, 2005, 06:34 PM
Hi everyone - someone emailed me to say they were bothered by my response to the reverse sneeze. I am sorry to have upset anyone and here was my response to that person.

I was simply trying to tell an anecdote about my dogs. I have had a few dogs get the RS, and it's almost like saying 'boo' to someone with the hiccups. If its done in the right way to the right dog they can actually control the spasms and stop them. Not to say that they won't start up again in the next hour when something sets it off. And it certainly isn't a cure, but in the moment it can stop them and help them from suffering from the spasms. I was simply trying to share my experience.
I am sure it depends on what is causing your dog to 'reverse sneeze'. Everyone interprets these things differently. Some people whose dog has kennel cough thinks the dog is trying to cough up a bone lodged in their throat because that is what it sounds like. The 'reverse sneeze' can be caused by lots of different things and everyone describes it in their own way. Personally I never thought it sounded like a sneeze at all. To me it sounds like a reverse hiccup - as if the soft palate were interferring with the dogs ability to breathe and because he panics it becomes a spasm. There has not been enough reseach done on the RS because it is not life threatening and does not harm the dog - though the panic in their eyes is enough to disturb everyone in the room!
I am sorry to have shocked you that was not my intention at all. Perhaps I need to go back to the board and clarify myself.

So I hope that helps to clarify my earlier statement & remember that the RS will often go away on its own provided it is not caused by a physiological reason.