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Pop vs Soda

CyberKitten
July 20th, 2005, 02:38 PM
What generic word do you use to describe carbonated soft drinks? (Note that these could be of any brand or type, Coca-Cola, Pepsi, 7-Up, etc. the overall word, not a specific brand.) See the web site for further info: http://www.popvssoda.com/

Dogastrophe
July 20th, 2005, 02:41 PM
Pop. (and chocolate bars, not candy bar)

Prin
July 20th, 2005, 02:41 PM
I use 7-up, coke, ginger ale, Crush (applies to anything fizzy that is nasty, colored funny or non-descript)... Somehow I fell that iced tea should be in this list too.. :)

Basically I use the brand.

happycats
July 20th, 2005, 02:47 PM
I say "Pop" but quite often I say "sodapop" :)
I think most Canadians say Pop, and Americans say Soda. ;)

Beaglemom
July 20th, 2005, 02:50 PM
I say pop. Dogastrophe, I also say chocolate bar not candy bar.

CyberKitten
July 20th, 2005, 02:52 PM
Re: "I think most Canadians say Pop, and Americans say Soda." I thought so too but it is very regional - some parts of the US say pop, others soad, Georgia says coke (Coke has its HQ there) for every kind of ...er ... soft drink). Look at the map on the web site, it's intriging. <g>

And, sorry but iced tea is not pop or soda or any soft drink. It is not carbonated. I like Hawaiian Punch too (strange I know, lol) but it does not qualify either.

I also say chocolate bars but then chocolate bars were invented in New Brunswick, lol

Prin
July 20th, 2005, 02:54 PM
In French, it's liqueures douces, so my man "Franglais" it up and says Liquor. "You want a liquor?"

CyberKitten
July 20th, 2005, 02:58 PM
We often say here "Veux tu un pop?, lol As you likely know, more Quebecois drink pepsi than coke so I do hear people saying "Donnez moi un pepsi")

Writing4Fun
July 20th, 2005, 02:59 PM
Oh, no! Not this again! :D This was one of the things I was teased for mercilessly when I first moved to Ontario - along with pronouncing the letter "h" as "haiche" instead of "aiche". The translation of "liqueures douces" is actually "soft drinks", which is what we've always called them. :p

heidiho
July 20th, 2005, 03:04 PM
I Cant Believe How Many Say Pop,that Is Funny I Say Coke Or Soda No One Says Pop In Arizona

Shamrock
July 20th, 2005, 03:20 PM
Sodapop? That sounds funny to me too! :) I thought soda was strictly an American term..
The only soda I know is baking - or Club..

Prin
July 20th, 2005, 03:46 PM
Funny thing, I always thought people who said sodapop were joking. :D Sodypop. :D

pags
July 20th, 2005, 04:10 PM
Extreme Southern US - we usually call it all "Coke". And a photocopy machine is a "Xerox" and so on...

I sometimes have a hard time when travelling elsewhere in the country and I forget this.. OR when we have a transplanted person working as waitress in a restaurant here... "What would you like to drink?" "Just a Coke for me" "I'm sorry but we only have Pepsi." "Yes - that's what I said..." :p

jjgeonerd
July 20th, 2005, 04:11 PM
Someone told me "pop" was an east coast thing...looks like it might be true! Being on the west coast I'm a "soda" guy.

Jackie467
July 20th, 2005, 04:39 PM
I call it both, sometimes I call it pop others soda, but never coke. I lived in PA where everyone calls it pop and if you say soda they look at you really weird. Here in Houston they call it soda or coke. If you say pop most people have no idea what you are talking about, which is why since I'v moved here I'v started saying soda. My SO calles everything Coke, which drives me nuts. In the US it seems like in the north east it's pop and in the south and west it's soda and in the really deep south (like houston) some people call everything coke.

Prin
July 20th, 2005, 04:45 PM
I think the only thing I know of that isn't called by a brand name is paper towels. But then the French call them "Scotts".

happycats
July 20th, 2005, 04:48 PM
I think the only thing I know of that isn't called by a brand name is paper towels. But then the French call them "Scotts".

What do you call toilet paper?? :D

Joey.E.CockersMommy
July 20th, 2005, 04:48 PM
I say pop and chocolate bar too. I think in England Lemonaid is gingerale if I remember correctly

happycats
July 20th, 2005, 04:50 PM
I say pop and chocolate bar too. I think in England Lemonaid is gingerale if I remember correctly

And in Holland a Coffe house doesn't really have coffee!! :)

pags
July 20th, 2005, 04:51 PM
What do you call toilet paper?? :D

LOL Funny you should ask that! Down here a bunch of people call the toilet paper "Charmin"...( I used to do the name-brand thing more when I was younger... Though I've toned it down a bit just so I can be more clear. I once called it Charmin too.. although I had never actually used the brand. :p )

kandy
July 20th, 2005, 05:44 PM
I say Pop and I say candy bars. Lots of the oldtimers around here say "sodapop". I used to just say Pepsi, but after my son got a job with Coca Cola, and I started getting free Coke products he heatedly corrects me if I say "hey, want a Pepsi?" so I've had to retrain myself. LOL I agree that soda would make me think of club soda, which I love - seltzer water too! YUM!

Prin
July 20th, 2005, 05:50 PM
LOL happycats! My family has always called toilet paper "bumwad" or um.. "certain places" wipe. :D Doesn't get a brand name either.

Shamrock
July 20th, 2005, 06:02 PM
Originally Posted by happycats
"What do you call toilet paper??"

Bathroom tissue. Or tissue paper.

lol.. Happycats - what DO the coffee shops in Holland offer then?

melanie
July 20th, 2005, 06:06 PM
in australia you will never hear anyone ever say pop or soda unless its a canadian or american backpacker, its not used here and we very rarely use words similar to yours, hey it would be unaustralian :D

we call all carbonated drinks -SOFT DRINK, OR FIZZY DRINKS (sometimes lolly water). and coke is only used when you actually buy a coke, that is the black elixer of tastyness i mean...

the only pop i know is a grandfather, and the ony soda i know is for baking or removing stubborn stains (club soda)....

and to clarify we dont have candy either, we have lollies and chocolates. lollies are exactly the same as your candys i think (got that from the movies :D ). and chocolates are bars and free or loose chocs.....i looooovvvveeee lollies... :D

happycats
July 20th, 2005, 06:15 PM
Originally Posted by happycats
"What do you call toilet paper??"

Bathroom tissue. Or tissue paper.

lol.. Happycats - what DO the coffee shops in Holland offer then?

marajuana (sp) :o

Prin
July 20th, 2005, 07:32 PM
But you only know that because you heard a story about it, right? A friend of a friend told you? :D

Shamrock
July 20th, 2005, 07:41 PM
Happycats, lol! I realized the moment I'd posted this question that this is what it had to be..
But - shouldnt they call it Herb House or something.?


Another question:

Is it "brown" bread - or wheat?

To me, "wheat" signifies whole wheat bread.

Brown bread is well.. brown :D

Prin
July 20th, 2005, 07:45 PM
What is the difference? Whole wheat bread is brown... Do you mean that really dark brown bread?

I don't know how I would say it- I haven't been able to eat brown/whole wheat bread since I was 11...

Shamrock
July 20th, 2005, 08:03 PM
Yes, in restaurants here you are offered a choice for your sandwich/toast - white or brown? (sometimes whole grain)

In the U.S - it's white or wheat? They dont use the term brown bread,at least not in the few states I've been in.

So, asking for this is just a little tipoff that you are a Canadian - if they hadnt guessed by ordering tea to go with it ;)

happycats
July 20th, 2005, 08:08 PM
But you only know that because you heard a story about it, right? A friend of a friend told you? :D

LOL :D Actually I have been there,, and saw it with my own eyes :eek: :p

happycats
July 20th, 2005, 08:11 PM
Happycats, lol! I realized the moment I'd posted this question that this is what it had to be..
But - shouldnt they call it Herb House or something.?

Or maybe a "get happy" house, :sick: !!


Another question:

Is it "brown" bread - or wheat?

To me, "wheat" signifies whole wheat bread.

Brown bread is well.. brown :D
I say whole wheat :)

Prin
July 20th, 2005, 08:13 PM
Hey one thing that separates Quebecers from the rest of Canada is how we order French fries.

Rest of Canada: "Can I have some fries?"
Quebec: "Can I have a fry?"
People out west think they're soooo funny when they say "A fry? Really, just one?" :rolleyes: What can I say, we're a distinct society. :rolleyes:

CyberKitten
July 20th, 2005, 08:15 PM
We say fry in NB too - except for my dad who says chips but then he's Irish! We also have poutine palaces and in addition to McLobster, you can get poutines as well. I am not a poutine person myself but my brother, Gawd I don't know how he eats that stuff, lol

Prin
July 20th, 2005, 08:22 PM
Is it poo-teen or pootsin?

kandy
July 20th, 2005, 08:51 PM
We say fry in NB too - except for my dad who says chips but then he's Irish! We also have poutine palaces and in addition to McLobster, you can get poutines as well. I am not a poutine person myself but my brother, Gawd I don't know how he eats that stuff, lol

That's that nasty looking stuff with giant cheese curds, right? :yuck:

I think I'll go buy myself a plane ticket to Holland! :crazy: (Just kidding - but I do know a few people that could use to go!)

CyberKitten
July 20th, 2005, 10:15 PM
Yep, it is that nasty gooey looking stuff, lol Prin, we say pou -tin (with your best French accent) with the tin pronounced like a badly sounding eh. Some Anglphones say pou tine (teen) though.

melanie
July 21st, 2005, 01:36 AM
we have chips, except at mcdonalds who sell fries....

we have white bread, wholemeal bread (brown) and grain bread.... (not to mention the million other varieties)......

as a smoker, a trip to holland is naturally a girls first choice :D :p :p

jessi76
July 21st, 2005, 12:23 PM
Someone told me "pop" was an east coast thing...looks like it might be true! Being on the west coast I'm a "soda" guy.

I'm on the east coast and it's definately SODA here.

pamha
July 21st, 2005, 01:38 PM
My little corner of the world uses several unique words or pronounciations that aren`t usually heard elsewhere. Carbonated drinks are all 'sodys'. Anyone who asks for 'pop' is either a tourist or recent transplant. ;)

Dogastrophe
July 21st, 2005, 01:54 PM
we have chips, except at mcdonalds who sell fries....



Chips in NS means potato chips, unless you order a fish and chips in which case it means french fries.

toby's tracy
July 21st, 2005, 02:01 PM
we say pou -tin (with your best French accent) with the tin pronounced like a badly sounding eh. Some Anglphones say pou tine (teen) though.

That's a first for me! I have never heard anyone call it pou - tin with the eh sound! I spent 4 years working in a very francophone bar in Montreal that served the stuff and everybody called it poutine (teen)!

Maybe it's a Montreal thing and not an Anglo thing?

toby's tracy
July 21st, 2005, 02:05 PM
I never call it pop...I remember being in Nashville and giggling at my friends' use of pop...but then, they were giggling at how I said pecan (pee-can) :) .

I don't think I really say soda either...I call it a soft drink...or liqueur if I'm ordering in French. ;)

mrjohndoe
July 21st, 2005, 03:44 PM
but then, they were giggling at how I said pecan (pee-can) :)

LOL! I nearly pee-can'd myself! :evil:

My girlfriend is from MA and use to call it tonic. I'd never heard that before. When she lived in Upstate NY she asked where the tonic was and the clerk took her down the hair care aisle. They call it pop just like the rest of us normal people! :D :evil:

PS. I just can't see myself eating a sodasicle.

melanie
July 21st, 2005, 06:03 PM
we dont have popsicles really either, their called ice blocks....

whenever i think of the words soda or pop it comes out in my mind with this thick southern drawl, 'kan i have a poooop plllease' oh you gotta hear it its soooo funny....

i think both of thsoe words remind me of western movies, its like those hershy chocolate bars you have, whenever their mentioned i think of war, in the movies this is something the soldiers give the kids in the land their saving, stupid i know but hey its my imagination and a bit of hollywood influence......

kandy
July 21st, 2005, 06:39 PM
we dont have popsicles really either, their called ice blocks....

Hmmmm, that's what I use in the cooler to keep my beer cold. Of course, I prefer cubed. :crazy:

Prin
July 21st, 2005, 10:28 PM
You don't have popsicles? Or Fudgesicles? :eek: :eek: How do you grow up in a place without fudgesicles?

melanie
July 22nd, 2005, 02:18 AM
a fudgesicle sounds a very difficult thing to eat, sticky i would imagine, is it just fudge on a stick??

our ice blocks are mainly water with flavors or juice and frozen in shapes, and they also come in chocolate and such, like an icecream or flavored ice on a stick really..... charlie my dog looovvveeeesss ice blocks.....

and we make our own to, we flavor water or use straight juice and pour into molds and freeze, you jsut stick the stick in the middle yourself...... and voila, a yummy iceblock.......

we have ice blocks and icecreams (cone and such) that is generally it....

but fudge on a stick, yeah i could go one of those for sure....mmmmmmmm....

oh yum im starvin :eek:

Prin
July 22nd, 2005, 01:05 PM
Hey I found a recipe: (I haven't tried it though)
http://www.dhcheney.com/fudgesicl.html

1 (4-oz) package instant chocolate pudding mix
2 cups whole or skim milk
1/4 cup sugar
1 cup evaporated milk

Combine pudding and whole or skim milk in a large bowl.

Beat 2 minutes.

Stir in sugar and evaporated milk.

Pour into popsicle molds (or use paper cups and popsicle sticks) and freeze.

Here, Mel, go here- I have a feeling you don't know what a popsicle is either... :D Do you?
http://www.popsicle.com/treats/Treats.asp

kandy
July 22nd, 2005, 03:19 PM
a fudgesicle sounds a very difficult thing to eat, sticky i would imagine, is it just fudge on a stick??

That's funny - my mom would love it if they were really just fudge on a stick! :) Course, she'd take it without the stick too!

CyberKitten
July 22nd, 2005, 04:47 PM
My friends think I'm nuts but I love banana popcicles. Wouldn't you know we keep popcicles in the unit at the hospital!!! They're for the kids tho but they sometimes share, lol

Anyone ever make their own popcicles in the freezer?

happycats
July 22nd, 2005, 04:58 PM
Anyone ever make their own popcicles in the freezer?

All the time!! I find it's much healthier for my son when I make my own with real juice, Tropicana fruit juice blends are great for this!
You can pick up popsicle makers in the dollar store for a buck.

chico2
July 22nd, 2005, 05:19 PM
My husband,being from France,knows English perfectly,but sometimes screws up on the pronounciation(sp?)...
At work when ask what he liked to drink,he said coke,but he said it with ck instead of ke :D so from now on he drinks Pepsi :D

Prin
July 22nd, 2005, 05:26 PM
LOL I have heard that before! When you work in a resort, you get all sorts of accents. It's funny sometimes.

melanie
July 22nd, 2005, 06:28 PM
prin hon, please, im not from tasmania you know :eek: (sorry tassies) :D :p

your popsicle is exactlythe same as our ice blocks, exactly the same, even the fancy ones you get in the stores.....colored flavored ice really, i eat ice blocks alot in summer, i love the pure juice ones, yuuummmmm..............

CK frozeen babnanas, oh delicious, i love them and i will put a stick in it to make an ice block, yuuummmmmm..... try frozen grapes, delish and just like grape sorbet...

Prin
July 22nd, 2005, 06:52 PM
LOL Melanie- I didn't get the ice blocks thing. Here, ice blocks are what you put in your cooler to keep the food cold on trips... To me Ice Blocks means this:

doggy lover
July 22nd, 2005, 09:40 PM
In England they call them ice lollies, Mel do you call potato chips, crisps like the British.
Is Canada the only country that sells milk in bags?
The thing I don't like about Quebec is they only sell white margarine, I like my yellow marg. Funny how we call things different names. I'm English by birth and my husband is Canadian we have had a few arguements about names for different things.
Undershirt-vest
beets-beet root
canker sore-ulser and so on

Prin
July 22nd, 2005, 10:18 PM
Funny, eh? I can't eat yellow margarine. It looks so fake to me now. :D

LL1
July 23rd, 2005, 08:57 PM
I say pop and my american pals say soda.To me brown bread is pumpernickel.I dont eat margarine now but when I did the soy marg was white and was way better than the violent yellow ones.Poutine is properly pronounced more like pouteh not pooteen as ck already said.Mel I am giggling on your thoughts on holland being a smoker.I also like english expressions,a dear pal of mine says dosh for money,and to tease or rib someone is to take the p--- out of,there are all kinds of them.

Shamrock
July 23rd, 2005, 10:25 PM
Now THOSE are ice blocks, Prin. :D
Yes, accents are fascinating, and can really change the meanings too :D

On vacation in Alberta,my hubby and I met and were chatting with a young German couple,who were staying in the same Lodge.
When they found out we were from B.C, they asked with sincerity - "where did all your Soul Man go?"

We looked at them, stymied. Pardon? Soul Man?
"Yes, your Soul Man. We heard they were almost gone.

Awkward silence.Ummm.. sorry,could you elaborate on that?

Turned out they were asking about B.C. Salmon, and their dwindling numbers.
Quite a different kettle of fish. :D

melanie
July 24th, 2005, 09:00 PM
doggy lover, well we are far more like the brits (ah thats what happens when your a convicts kid :D :D ) than anything else, ice lollies is near to ice blocks, and you must have lollies there too, instead of sweets (im a lolly freak :D )

yep potato chips, or jsut chips (hot or cold) nah no crisps though

undershirt- to us its called a singlet :D

and who eats white margarine, never seen that either, ours is yellow or you jsuts use butter. (margarine has over 1000 human made chemicles in it to make it so prety and tasty, yuck)...

we also use dosh for money (more used by younger generations), many english slang terms make it to our shores.....

prin we dont have those ice blocks, there is nary a place in this country where one could source such huge bits of ice, we buy ours in a bag at the petrol station, all crushed up and lovely, but it does not get mined by eskimos or anything, jsut some bloke at the ice factory (yes we still have them)...

and the only ice block i want is a red and coke flavored one yuuummmmmmm

LL1
July 24th, 2005, 09:03 PM
I heard that one before,my friend's Dad is from Scotland and he says that too.

Soya margarine is generally white,I know alot of veggies use it,tastes better than margarine.

undershirt- to us its called a singlet :D

and who eats white margarine, never seen that either, ours is yellow or you jsuts use butter. (margarine has over 1000 human made chemicles in it to make it so prety and tasty, yuck)...

Dogastrophe
July 25th, 2005, 07:48 AM
and who eats white margarine, never seen that either, ours is yellow or you jsuts use butter. (margarine has over 1000 human made chemicles in it to make it so prety and tasty, yuck)...



I've been told, and perhaps one of the Quebec members can verify, that the margarine in Quebec is white due to government legislation that was brought about by the dairy producers. Apparently they felt that if they marg was yellow, people would confuse it with butter which would ruin their industry. I believe that margarine is yellow in the rest of Canada.

toby's tracy
July 25th, 2005, 08:23 AM
the margarine in Quebec is white due to government legislation that was brought about by the dairy producers. Apparently they felt that if they marg was yellow, people would confuse it with butter which would ruin their industry.

Yup - I remember when Margarine first had to be white - ickerama! It looked disgusting. But now I'm used to it. I wasn't aware it was only in Quebec...

The dairy industry was already in steady decline and margarine was being sold as a better substitute for butter and the industry asked for, and got, legislation to separate, so to speak, margarine from butter.

Former Liberal premier Robert Bourassa passed the rule in 1987, which at that time mirrored a measure in Ontario.

Quebec said it was designed to ensure consumers weren’t confused about the products, but ultimately protected the dairy industry.

According to dairy producers, 600 farms and 3,000 jobs would be threatened if margarine took butter’s yellow glow.

from: http://right-thinking.com/index.php/weblog/comments/9527/