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Enough hair to make a coat

StaceyB
July 19th, 2005, 11:55 PM
I just noticed that my neighbour had shaved his golden. I have also had countless students ask if they should shave their double coated breeds. I just wanted to let those of you who don't know that this is really not a good idea. Look at your dog, you notice that the majority of their hair is laying somewhat flat against the body with most of these breeds. If you were to shave it off your dog will turn into a puff ball. The coat will be ruined for life as the undercoat will then grow faster than the top coat. It will also get thicker and mat more easily. I know that they can easily lose enough for you to make a coat for yourself but there are better ways of controlling it and thinning out the coat. Pick up a thinning comb it works great for removing all those crinkle hairs. It is alternating with short and tall pins. Place the comb against the body and move through the hair in a scooping motion. Removing all this dead coat will cut down the shedding.

Schwinn
July 20th, 2005, 10:40 AM
It should also be pointed out that some breeds coats actually help cool them in the summer, and shaving the coat will make them warmer. I don't know which ones, as I'm not a groomer, but I know my parent's mutt was one where they were told not to shave him.

Beaglemom
July 20th, 2005, 11:00 AM
The coat will be ruined for life as the undercoat will then grow faster than the top coat.

Really? I have clipped many of our long haired dogs (all were poodle crosses of some sort) and the hair always grew in normally. Is it different for goldens? I know that certain breeds should not be shaved down since the hair protects these breeds in the summer as well as in the winter (Samoyeds, Mals, Huskies, just to name a few).

I prefer the long hair on these breeds, not the shaved look, I was just curious. I know that our poodle crosses were different as they didn't have an undercoat and the hair just keeps growing! One in particular looks most like a poodle!

StaceyB
July 20th, 2005, 12:22 PM
All dogs hair protects them from both the heat in summer and cold in winter. It is the dogs that have an undercoat that should not be shaved. Poodles have hair very similar to yours. It isn't a double coat and is continuous growth. It doesn't have a maximum length, it just keeps on growing.
Dogs don't sweat like you do. They release their heat through their mouth and feet not through their skin.

SnowDancer
July 20th, 2005, 12:43 PM
I fully agree - my Eskimo has the double coat. On Sunday at a pet store whose name I will not mention, several people including my Eskie watched as a 15 lb. Eskimo was shaved - not trimmed - but shaved right down to the pink skin (as close as the skin on my guy's tummy). First they did the body but then moved on to the tail and head. We had seen the dog come in to the store - dirty - but had not been sprayed by a skunk. (I know what to do as Plan A should my dog get sprayed and the groomer or vet not be open - supplies are on hand.) My already very pretty boy received many more compliments from onlookers. No way is this dog's furry hair going to grow back in properly and I can only imagine how much he is itching. If I asked my dog's groomer to do this I would be shown the door - and rightly so! My dog is 15 months old so am being careful with this heat. Very short outings - last week though at 8:15 - I remember it too well - we only got to end of laneway - there was absolutely no air and I didn't like his breathing - so "iced" his foot pads and put a cool towel under his armpits and his tummy and then his head. Seemed to work as he immediately demanded a cookie. His coat is very dense - has never "blown" - groomer did it for him. We get tumbleweeds of course, but when I brush him hardly any fur comes off - so no new coat for me! Thankfully.

Beaglemom
July 20th, 2005, 01:20 PM
Thanks StaceyB for clarifying that for me. I was curious. I know that some people mean well, but they should be told by the groomers that they are doing more harm to their dogs than good in these cases.

SnowDancer, Eskies are beautiful with their coats! I wouldn't ever dream of shaving a dog with such a beautiful coat!

I knew someone who shaved down her golden once because the hair had gotten badly matted, instead of brushing out the dog, she went the easy route and shaved her down completely. It is important for people to understand the responsibility and the commitment involved in the grooming care that these dogs require. Luckily, her hair grew back beautifully. I hope she doesn't decide to do it again though.