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Histiocytic Inflammation

gailwillow
July 1st, 2005, 12:08 PM
I was told my cat has
Histiocytic inflammation with hemorrhage and mesenchymal cell proliferation.
Does anyone know what this means as I don't understand. My cat started off with a lump.
Please email me : gailwillow@tiscali.co.uk
Any help is appreciated. Thank you in advance.
Gail

Luba
July 1st, 2005, 12:30 PM
Never heard of it myself. Maybe try typing it in a google or other search engine and read up on what the links say.

Best of luck.

KessyWessy
July 1st, 2005, 05:58 PM
What a mouthful.

I started googling, and immediately realized it was beyond my comprehension . I really didn't get any valuable information from it when I tried to look up each word, but when I put your cat's "diagnosis" in google ther results were more promising, though still beuond me. You might try that though.

To be honest I'd just call your vet back if I were you and ask him (her) to explain it in words the rest of us can understand.

Sorry I coudn't help more. I'm sure someone else here will have better medical knowledge than I.

raingirl
July 2nd, 2005, 06:20 PM
Took me a while but I broke it down.

Histiocytic inflammation= Histiocytic is also refered to as "tissue macrophages" so it's basically a type of tissue....that is inflammed

hemorrhage= bleeding

mesenchymal cell proliferation= increased production of mesenchymal cells (they create certain types of tissues, including cat food pads).

Basically you have mesenchymal cells creating histiocytic tissue that is inflammed and bleeding.

I don't mean to scare you, but I found a lot of references to possible cancer with the above, as well as a lot of info associated with the lungs. I would assume if it was cancer, your vet would have told you. It could be idiopathic though (unknow cause). Basically every site I saw said "tumor" and "malignent". I would speak to your vet about it, because if the lump is removed (depending on what "grade" it is, the higher the grade, the harder it is to remove) the better chance your animal will survive.
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