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Is my cat retarded?

5willow
June 25th, 2005, 12:24 AM
My cat was a stray when I found her about 6 months ago, and is probably 2 years old now. She walks around with her tongue out all the time, and has even bit into her tongue a few times from having it out, causing it to bleed for days sometimes. She won't cover up at all in the litter box, and doesn't know how to clean herself very well - doesn't use her paw to get her face and head, etc. Just covers a few main areas. Now she has sores on her head (from not getting cleaned?). So now I have been using a wash rag to wipe it for her.
She won't eat anything except her dry cat food, and then she kind of sucks on it before she eats. Sometimes I think it is from her sore tongue, but I don't think it is always sore.
We battled worms, diareah, and ear mites the first three months, which she gave also to my first cat. I love cats, and would hate to get rid of her, but she is always dirty from not cleaning herself, and sometimes gets pee/poop when using the litter box, and so I hate to pet her sometimes. Is she maybe just lazy? Any suggestions?
:fingerscr

Lucky Rescue
June 25th, 2005, 12:35 AM
Sounds like maybe a head injury, and could have been a broken jaw that healed wrong and the cat may be in pain and at the least is having a hard time eating. Why don't you give her canned food?

I assume you've taken this cat to the vet? What does he/she say?

Luba
June 25th, 2005, 12:36 AM
Are you serious or joking?
What did the vet say?

5willow
June 25th, 2005, 11:53 AM
I've been to the vet a lot at first. She knows me well by now, but didn't before. I am not sure they know as much as they should - they said maybe she has an allergy, to try different foods or litter. I have, and found that she likes the cheap stuff - purina cat chow. Won't eat the Science Diet, Iams, etc that I tried. Won't even look at canned food, table scraps, or even juice from the tuna can! None of the stuff my other cat devours. The vet treated her twice for worms, and said that worked. But she threw up a long round worm, and I had to go searching the web and found a herbal medicine that cleaned it right up. Also found that colostrum is a good nutritional supplement to help them fight off diseases, feas, etc. (Good link to go to -http://www.thepetwhisperer.com)
Here's something I forgot to mention - I caught her once sitting in the middle of the road - there was a car that had stopped in the road, and was honking at her to move. But she just looked at them, and so they drove around her! But now she knows the boundry of our yard, and won't leave it for anything. Whew! She likes to help me out in the garden and flower beds, by laying right where I am working, etc.
:p

Lucky Rescue
June 25th, 2005, 01:58 PM
IF your vet thinks allergies are causing the symptoms you mention, you need to find a new vet not to mention the fact that she can't even treat worms.

Please try once more to help your cat. This not grooming, tongue biting etc is NOT caused by allergies and for sure not by "laziness".

Please dont' "get rid of her" because she is handicapped. She sounds sweet and loving, has had a very hard time and doesn't deserve to die just because she's not clean.:(

5willow
June 25th, 2005, 02:31 PM
I didn't know if vets are used to seeing cats for things that may be a behavioral thing. But it could be that the "sore tongue" thing may hurt when she washes. If I need to bath her once a week (which I have been doing), then I will. I ask if she is retarded, because sometimes knowing what the problem is helps you treat it. My son was thought to have ADHD at one time, which ended up being overcome by adjusting his sleep schedule. If my cat had ADHD, or a similar problem, I would like to know how to adjust to it. I would need to think like a mother cat, not like I do as a mother - do I need to clean her paws/wash her daily? weekly? I don't want her to get something that would spread over to my son, who plays with her and doesn't wash his hands before eating or wipeing his face. It's the litter thing that I worry about spreading. I had gotten worms from this cat myself, and had to spend the last 60 days cleansing it out of my system. I don't know if my son has it or not - you see my problem? I have my other family/cat to worry about, too. Also, this cat come tries to lay by your head when you sleep, and touches her paws to my mouth/face (like she's using her paw as a kiss?) all the time when I hold her and when I sleep - I think that is how I ended up with worms - litter on paws, then her putting her paws in my face. If she was clean, that would be a cute jesture. But I worry about the sanitary thing. What else could we catch?

Luba
June 25th, 2005, 03:39 PM
I'm starting to think this is a joke


If you're not joking then you're being very irresponsible.

5willow
June 25th, 2005, 05:21 PM
Why would that be? I am a very good wife and mother, and a respectable person in my community. And considering the type of job I have, I would consider myself very responsible. If you knew the hours I have spent researching my cat's problems on the internet, and money spent so far on medicine, etc, you wouldn't say that.

Lucky Rescue
June 25th, 2005, 08:02 PM
If you have been researching, then you would never think this is due to allergies or that it's behavioral.

Again, it sounds like the cat suffered some head trauma and the problems could be neurological. There are simple tests a vet can perform to find out if there is brain damage.

How does this cat get pee/poop on her? Is she unable to stand properly in the litterbox?

Any cat can get worms, and I don't understand why it's been so hard to get rid of them. A few pills from the vet clears them right up.

Of course, if the cats are going out, they can continually be reinfected.

A VERY simple answer is to keep this cat inside where she belongs. Then you will have no need to worry about worms, germs, fleas or anything else picked up outside.

CyberKitten
June 25th, 2005, 08:53 PM
This cat needs help and the word is intellectually disadvantaged. I shudder at the other word, long since forgotten in Canada thank Gawd!! (I belong to a disability rights organization so humour me OK, lol) Actually I am VERY serious!

This cat needs help and you need to bring her to a vet. It may well be a medical problem. If she has worms, she can be dewormed and get meds for that. Outside cats live in avg 4-5 yrs. All cats shouold stay indoors where they will lead long wonderful lives!!

My cat puts her paw on my face as a sign of endearment - this kitty sounds affectionate! If she does have any communicable illness - and not many diseases actually are transeferred from cat to human tho there are a few - but you can prevent that by keeping her indoors and taking her to a vet to eradicate whatever infection she does have, if any.

Is it possible she is hearing impaired? Many cats live wonderful lives in spite of that - most cats do better than humans with so called handicaps. They adjust very well. Cats that cannot hear cn ever be taught sign language but there are simpler measures if this happend to be the case and you do not want to do that.

You owe it to this kitty to find out what's wrong. She could have a brain injury - God knows what happened to her of she has spent so much time outdoors.

Good luck and let us know how you make out!!

Luba
June 25th, 2005, 08:57 PM
Well put CyberK

JessXx
June 25th, 2005, 09:29 PM
Okay, I have a few issues with this post...
1 being the title, I don't think IS MY CAT RETARDED is a title
you should put on. Maybe something like I need help w/ my cat.

2. Your cat WAS A STRAY of course there will be problems!! I don't know why you would ask some of the q's you asked.
HERES THE OBVIOUS- Your cat WAS STRAY and had problems, will continue to have problems and will devolp new problems. IF you find a stray cat, adopt a stray cat or whatever be warned that the cat WILL have issues that it can never get over. Cats who have been strays are NOT normal, and god knows what the poor things been through... so NO I dont think your poor little kitty is retarded... I think your cat has some problems that need to be helped.

3. Why are you asking US?? you should see a VET NOW!! If MY cat was biting its tounge,getting soars on its head etc. I would take it to the vet.
If your cat is suffering from all the things you say then I would advise you to
get your butt to a vet and FAST. The cat is not healthy... and I think you are being irresponsible. Sure youre making an effort but it takes more than that to own a cat...
Thats all I have to say for now,
Bye

raingirl
June 25th, 2005, 09:44 PM
The vet treated her twice for worms, and said that worked. But she threw up a long round worm, and I had to go searching the web and found a herbal medicine that cleaned it right up.

I would be concerned about that. When did that happen? Has she been to the vet since? How do you know it worked?

When was she last at the vet? If you vet isn't helping you clear up the worms and sores on her head each time, then you need a new vet. Take her to the vet with a fresh poop sample (to test) and figure out what is wrong. lack of cleaning by her shouldn't cause sores on her head.

Has it been investigated that maybe she has a longer than normal tongue? Maybe she can't fit it into her mouth? Maybe it's getting dry because it's out all the time? If it's too long, maybe that's why she has trouble grooming. My tongue is slightly longer than normal (so is sophie b. hawkins) and I tend to have problems because of it. Could be it?

Lucky Rescue
June 25th, 2005, 09:48 PM
IF you find a stray cat, adopt a stray cat or whatever be warned that the cat WILL have issues that it can never get over. Cats who have been strays are NOT normal,

This is not true. Many strays turn out to be the sweetest and most lovable cats around. All of my many, many cats were strays and all were wonderful. Nearly everyone who has adopted cats from us has gotten former strays, and they are all very happy with their cats.

On the other hand, I've seen cats raised in the same home since kittenhood and they can have issues too.

I don't want anyone reading this to not take in a stray because they think it will be abnormal or sick.

twinmommy
June 25th, 2005, 09:56 PM
agree with Lr. All my pets are strays, and they are wonderful!!

I think strays tend to show you how grateful they are for saving them.

also agree with Jessx--the title is a bit rough, not fond your wording, hoping it's just that--wording.

Did you ask "why" the vet thinks it is an allergy? Are you going have some follow up preferably with another vet? Herbal remedies are sometimes more elaborate and therefore less efficient than we think. Often we shorten the duration of the treatment based upon dosages and time spans learned in conventional medecine. Herbal products sometimes need nore time. Are you sure that you got rid of the worms with the herbal med?

Safyre
June 25th, 2005, 10:05 PM
I've been to the vet a lot at first. She knows me well by now, but didn't before. I am not sure they know as much as they should
Well, there is your first problem. if you do not have confidence in your vet, we need to go to another vet. Do you have any particlar reason to NOT do that?
Where are you located? You might be near some of the members here who might be able to give GOOD VET recommendations.

She likes to help me out in the garden and flower beds, by laying right where I am working,
Quoting that for the responders that are complaining about the animal being outside.
If the cat stays right beside its owner while outside, why is that a problem? There are ppl on this board that walk their cats, or brings their cats outside with them. Is that a problem as well? The OP has not said that she allows her cat loose outside.

Lucky Rescue
June 25th, 2005, 10:28 PM
If the cat stays right beside its owner while outside, why is that a problem?

Because of this:

I caught her once sitting in the middle of the road - there was a car that had stopped in the road, and was honking at her to move. But she just looked at them, and so they drove around her!

If it happened once, it sure can again. No one can guarantee what an animal will do and the next time the driver may NOT drive around her. And certainly no cat with the kind of impairments this cat seems to have should be outside.

Safyre
June 25th, 2005, 11:36 PM
I was mistaken as it seems she did obviously allow her cat out of her sight.
Sorry, I just didn't see that comment in her posts at first. (lack of sleep)

Lucky Rescue
June 26th, 2005, 10:00 AM
NP. I miss stuff all the time, especially when people do not use paragraphs. :D

5willow
June 26th, 2005, 12:48 PM
:sorry: Thanks, guys. This is the help I was needing. SORRY about the use of the word "retarded". I have cousins who are/were "retarded", and were appropriately called that when I was young. I don't have any contact, really, with mentally challenged, so I am not up-to date with the "appropriate terminology" now.
About the cat going outside - I was raised with, and have always had, a cat. We had five cats living in our house while I grew up - we had five members in our family, so it just worked out that way. The cats went in and out - but stayed close the the house, and were in at night. Now, my cats go outside, don't leave the yard (now), and have a cat door to go in and out, which I lock at night. I have a small yard where I do alot of flower gardening (they love the flowers), and a back yard that is entirely a raised deck, where they spend their time sleeping on the lawn chairs. Nights, they sit out there until I yell that it is bed time. I do have birds that I feed, and I worry about disease coming from them - bird feed/dropping on the ground that they walk on. Also, our neighbor's cats (entirely outdoor cats, I think) come by and use our garden as a litter box sometimes, and sleep under our deck - I don't know how healthy they are -
I loved the little affectionate pats on my face from Rocco, but that is how the worms were spread.... :sick:
You have made me decide to make an appointment again - I feel bad about going to another vet, though! What will my other vet think - she had good intentions. I'll bring in a stool sample again. Wouldn't any brain damage been noticed during my other visits? The tongue thing didn't really show right away - she was really sick with diareah (worms? allergies?) and the ear infection thing in the beginning, and so maybe I was just too worried about that. She is allergic to foods, litter, so we spent those first months narrowing that down.
Her hearing is good - comes when I call, etc. She does have a meowing thing, though. Doesn't meow, and if she does, you can barely hear it. Oh, and something else I am very concerned about is she has swollen glands. The vet said it was from her allergies, because it would come and go. Now, it has been swollen for a month now. She sneezed alot, but that has gone away. I'd bet she has some kind of infection.
I will call on Monday for an appointment again. I had kind of given up on vets, deciding just they were good for the normal yearly shots, but I'll give it another try. If my vet doesn't work this time, I'll seek another.

5willow
June 26th, 2005, 01:12 PM
By the way, I have a post in "cat doesn't cover up" - she would never cover up her business (just started last night, by the way! Yay!)
And the worms - vet gave her a shot the first visit, since she was a stray - and then when I told her about the round worm Rocco threw up, she gave me some pills to give both cats. I think it was one pill then, and one in seven days. But I had a terrible time getting it down, ended with hair every where, scratches all over me, ect. (my other cat woke up long enough for me to give it to him, then went back to sleep without missing a wink). After waiting two weeks, she threw up a couple more worms! I bagged them up and took back to the vet, and she gave me a liquid this time (Albon). That was still a hassle - liquid went in the mouth, then back up down the chin and all over. She was NOT going to take it! So I was never sure how much she got down. That didn't work either -

twinmommy
June 26th, 2005, 01:25 PM
You can also buy these pill "dispensers" that look like a tiny cup on a stick. You put the pill in it and then put it in your cats mouth and then click it and pill goes down the back of the throat quickly.

Also a big fan of cheese for pilling animals--put it in the SECOND piece for "wiseguys" :D ;)

Lucky Rescue
June 26th, 2005, 02:27 PM
What will my other vet think - she had good intentions.

Who cares? This is like any other paid professional whose services you are paying good money for. If you aren't happy, you go elsewhere, right?

Wouldn't any brain damage been noticed during my other visits?

I guess it depends on if she was asked to look for this or not. Motor function can be tested if you request.

IF you see a new vet, tell him/her everything about this cat. Her behaviors are definitely abnormal.

Let us know!

As for "retarded"...this word can be used in an offensive way, as can many words, but strictly defined it merely means "slow" or "delayed", from the French "retarder".

JessXx
June 26th, 2005, 04:05 PM
This is not true. Many strays turn out to be the sweetest and most lovable cats around. All of my many, many cats were strays and all were wonderful. Nearly everyone who has adopted cats from us has gotten former strays, and they are all very happy with their cats.

On the other hand, I've seen cats raised in the same home since kittenhood and they can have issues too.

I don't want anyone reading this to not take in a stray because they think it will be abnormal or sick.

YES IT WILL HAVE ISSUES! Im not saying its going to be sickly forever and die in pain or whatever. Im saying that theres things it can't get over... sometimes its serious sometimes its not. IF A CAT WAS A STRAY THERES THINGS THAT ITS GONE THROUGH THAT WILL AFFECT IT LATER ON! Maybe serious, maybe not. Maybe its something little, maybe not. Im saying that a cat will have a few things, noticealbe or not... there will be something. It might be an illness, it might be afraid of something, it may like being outside more.
I guess the word ISSUES wasn't the word to use. Im trying to say that when you adopt a stray cat or take one in you need to be prepared to take what comes with it. Its the same thing as adopting a child from the streets. They will have some problems... it won't be easy at first... but they can be helped.
I didn't mean your cat will be challenged severly if s/he was a stray... but theres some things that won't go away. And I'll stick with that b/c it IS true...

JessXx
June 26th, 2005, 04:09 PM
another thing...
I agree, stray cats can be the sweetest things... and Im not saying theres anything wrong with them except the fact that they lived on the streets for so long. It's trauma... THATS THE WORD (FINALLY GOT IT)!!! Okay, its some trauma, if theres even a tiny bit of trauma, they'll always remember it... thats all i mean...
Ugh... try to understand me, I cant explain it any better.... :love:

Safyre
June 26th, 2005, 04:13 PM
You can also buy these pill "dispensers" that look like a tiny cup on a stick. You put the pill in it and then put it in your cats mouth and then click it and pill goes down the back of the throat quickly.

Also a big fan of cheese for pilling animals--put it in the SECOND piece for "wiseguys" :D ;)

My vet used one of those pill desensers trying to pill Dallas... didn't work. Dallas got himself soo worked up salivating soo much, the vet tried 4 times. His record is 5 times with another cat. Most cats will take the pill via dispenser, but some just don't like anything shoved in thie mouths.
Once they start salivating like crazy, its best to try again later.
My Dallas has to be a pain in the butt.

Angeleyes1437
June 26th, 2005, 05:11 PM
My uncle was hit by a car when he was 6 and became mentally challenged- however, sometimes people in my family use the word retarded... it can be interpreted as harsh but I don't take it offensively because some people speak before they can think about it. I don't think they mean any harm... however, the proper term is something of the like to mentally challenged or disabled. (yet if they use the word retarded in front of my uncle and his wife (yes, he married another mentally disabled woman, it's sweet) I do get mad- he just thinks he was diagnosed with a "slow working brain" so he doesn't really know he is considered extremely disabled. :( )

I may be way off, but regarding the tounge does this cat have any dental problems? I know with dogs (often puppy mill dogs) will have no front teeth therefore their tounge is ALWAYS hanging out of their mouth- it's a shame. Since you found the cat so young, I doubt this is the case- but nobody mentioned it.

As for worms, lesions/sores, and lack of cleanliness it seems like your cat may have a mental disability. Perhaps some type of accident caused this. I would DEFINITELY go to a new vet- if you must, tell your current vet you went "just to get a second opinon" since the problem has not been cleared up properly. HOwever, if the new vet heals the issues then maybe you should stick with him/her.

Aside from a mental disability your cat may just have consistent exposure to something she shouldn't. Did you ever watch her daily routines? See what she plays with or eats during the day? The tounge issue doesn't neccissarily mean she is mentally disabled. Additionally, mental disabilities are not always easily determined on animals- as they cannot speak. You must search for a new vet and have tests done. Perhaps purchase health insurance beforehand to help you with any issues that may arise.

Please don't give up on her.

Good luck!

Lucky Rescue
June 26th, 2005, 07:29 PM
Jess, what is your longterm experience with stray cats? How many have you taken in, cared for, kept or adopted out please?

I'm just trying to find out on what you are basing your statements.

Eleni
June 26th, 2005, 07:36 PM
my 2 of my 3 previously stray cats have no long term effects, in fact they behave no differently then my moms full bred cat.


1 of my cats is terribly shy, but that was from abuse.

I dont beleive all stray cats are damaged for life, and even if they were it would be all the mroe reason to love them and help them enjoy their years with us


Eleni

JessXx
June 26th, 2005, 08:24 PM
Eleni, I agree that its more reason to love them. AND Im not saying they are damaged for life, just theres some things that they've experienced that will affect them somehow later on. Its fine if you dont agree...

And I've had years of shelter work, I volunteer at the Humane society in my local city...
I am currently trying to work with 4 kittens who are disabled, they have something wrong b/c the mother had distemper when she was pregnant (I forget what its called, its new to me...)
I have had so many stray cats that I've taken care of, worked with and just been around. I don't know the exact number we've had in our home, and of course I can't even give an estimate of the amount of cats at the Humane Society...
The cats all needed special care, they all had SOMETHING wrong with them... examples,
One kitten was found at the river side when she was no more than three months old... we took her in. She had a hard time with drinking her water, she was so scared of it because it was 'deep' to her. So we ended up getting a flatter dish. She got adopted 1 month later. The owner said she would be afraid when people went to pick her up, and she had a hard time with anyone coming in or out of her area. Eventually it got better(its 6 months later now) and now she is very affectionate, she does sometimes get scared if someone moves a bit too fast, and the water thing is still there. Shes scared of any water dripping and she hates to be held by people if their hair is wet. This is a lifetime thing.
Our dog pepper is afraid of men b/c one hurt him a long time ago, thats not going to go away, but its gotten better. If we raise our voices or lift up our hands too fast he will flinch and get scared, this is what I mean.
One puppy who came to the shelter last year was found wandering around the highway. He was about 10 months we think he was a german sheperd cross. Well he was healthy and happy. We thought he was just fine... well we were wrong. He was scared of the highway, and I mean scared... he freaked out if he saw a car/truck. I was walking him one day and a car drove by, he pulled on the leash and jumped up on me. Now, he's still afraid but not as much, the noise scares him and he becomes jumpy... but with time its gotten a bit better.
An older cat that we got last month was a stray for only a week, her owner came to pick her up. When she left she was a bit skiddish. Now if a dog comes near her she will run away for hours, she never did that b4. Her owner says that she used to at least tolerate the dogs before.
So what Im saying is that some experiences are always in their minds, affecting them later.
I'll go on...
We found a male cat, he had been living in a doghouse for a while. The person who called us said that he kept coming around late at night and he was getting tired of it. We came to pick him up and as it turned out he was missing... but he had a tag and we called the owners. They had been looking for him for over 2 months. He was thin and very unhealthy, we kept him an additional 3 days to stablize him and saw some strange behaviours.He seemed to not be able to walk right. We checked and his leg was fractured. He seemed to get some brain damage from some sort of impact to his head. He also became blind in one eye. This was a 2 year old cat.
Lots of the strays we see aren't as affectionate at first but do learn to show affection. They will never be just like any other cat that was raised inside their whole life, they have those problems, they have those little experiences that the other cats haven't been through and it WILL ALWAYS AFFECT THEM NO MATTER WHAT. Not a lot in some cases, a lot in others.
Things like, a past owner abusing them, falling in water, getting hit by a car, freezing ears off, starving for days, getting attacked by dogs, being stuck in tree's, being caught in fire, being trapped (anywhere), getting heavy impact on the head (brain damage), losing a really close owner or another cat thats really close to them, moving from place to place.... this all shapes a cats personality. And every cat has something that happend to them that makes them afraid. My dog does too, she hates water because one day my sister was walking her and let go of her leash. Shyla decided to jump into the stream near the path, and it was a little deeper than anybody thought. shyla went under and her leash got stuck... I had to jump in and try to take it off. Thank god I was there... she lived and the only injury was mine, I had to get 10 stitches in my leg from a rock. My cat was walking on our counter and something fell on her, she doesn't go on the counter anymore. Once when she was outside (I was carrying her) a dog scared her, she hates going outside now.
IM NOT SAYING THAT A STRAY CAT WILL HAVE DISABILITIES. I hope that I'm explaining myself a bit better...

5willow
June 26th, 2005, 10:17 PM
You can also buy these pill "dispensers" that look like a tiny cup on a stick. You put the pill in it and then put it in your cats mouth and then click it and pill goes down the back of the throat quickly.

Also a big fan of cheese for pilling animals--put it in the SECOND piece for "wiseguys" :D ;)

I tried the dispenser - didn't work. I can't do the cheese thing- won't eat anything but dry cat food.

I knew when I took her in that she'd probably have problems. Probably had to eat what she found - she was really skinny and hungry when we met her. But you would think she wouldn't be so picky to only eat dry cat food if that was the case. Maybe it was the things she ate that made her distrust what she eats.

I'll check with the front teeth to see if they are missing. She won't let me look very well - clenches her teeth shut if she suspects I will try to.

Cactus Flower
June 26th, 2005, 11:47 PM
Im saying that a cat will have a few things, noticealbe or not... there will be something. If it isn't "noticeable", how do you know it's there?

Jess, you are what- 17 or 18? How many "years of shelter work" can you really have had? And I assume this is while you were going to school, as well? (Forgive me, but I have trouble believing any of your alleged history after you claimed to be a cop, then a cop-in-training....)

My cat was walking on our counter and something fell on her, she doesn't go on the counter anymore. Learning from experience does NOT equal TRAUMA.
Not every stray cat out there will be permanently traumatized. You pointed out yourself the things that can happen inside a home that make an impression upon a kitty, yet you're not running around saying "You'd better be prepared for what kind of trauma that inside cat has been through- something might have fallen on them in the house!".

They will never be just like any other cat that was raised inside their whole life, I just don't think that this is true, sorry. A few members here have stated that their cats were strays, and ARE like any other cat that was raised inside.

I think it's probably wise to anticipate that stray cats have had it rough out there, yes. And if there are any odd behaviors, it could be that they might have been traumatized in some way. But I share Lucky's concern that your statements might make someone hesitate in saving a stray or adopting a former stray.

Lucky Rescue
June 27th, 2005, 10:58 AM
Good post Cactus Flower.

5willow - sorry to divert your thread, but I think it's important that we clear this other issue up so that no one is turned off from adopting strays, either dogs or cats.

We have adopted out approximately 150 cats in the last 2 years. Most of them were stray. Frankly, we have less trouble with them than with cats who have lived indoors since kittenhood and who have never seen or experienced anything and who maybe have never even seen another cat.

The stray cats (not feral!) are much more laid back, and are even calm and relaxed at stressful adoption events because compared to life on the street, adoption events are a picnic to them. The housecats are terrified and freaked out.

You cannot judge a cat by it's behavior at a shelter. This is the most stressful place a cat ever be. Take them out of there, and often they are perfectly "normal" and sweet.

I am currently trying to work with 4 kittens who are disabled, they have something wrong b/c the mother had distemper

Distemper is a disease, not a behavioral problem and cats who are not strays can get it too.

Prin
June 27th, 2005, 11:08 AM
I know with doggies, when they've had it rough, they are so appreciative of their new homes. I sort of understand what Jess is talking about though, but I don't know if it applies to cats. An abused dog will "get over" his trauma, but never fully, and you have remnants that pop up here and there. Like with Boo, my boyfriend raised a frying pan when he was drying dishes and Boo hit the floor and started throwing up. You don't see it coming until it happens.

I think Boo was abandoned while doing his business and he became a stray for a while. Being a recovering stray though, the only thing we've had to face with him is his never ending drive to eat bunnies. I guess when he was hungry, he got one, and now he knows how tasty they are...

pags
June 27th, 2005, 11:52 AM
Just have to comment on the stray kitty thing too real quick. I was thinking about all the cats we've had .. since I was a kid until now... I believe we've had about 20 cats. The number is relatively small for 34 years because we had each of them an average of 12 years... the shortest being 10 years and the longest being 18. Of those 20 cats -- one was adopted at a shelter - a stray!... and another was given to me by a vet trying to place him (this wonderful kitty was a stray who had had both hips replaced and was on the disabled side). The rest were strays who adopted us. I guess I've been reading these posts wondering how else people get cats. LOL All these years and I never even knew that my kitties had 'issues' :eek:

willow -- keep working with your kitty. Does your kitty have a name, by the way? And -- I'm wondering how much time does she spend outside percentage-wise? Is she more outside than inside and you're simply bringing her in at night or whatever? I'm asking because there could be a whole lot your kitty is doing during the day that you're not aware of... Please forgive me if you've already answered this... I read through the thread and didn't find the answer -- but then I can miss this stuff sometimes. :)

twinmommy
June 27th, 2005, 12:18 PM
I think it's all relative in what you are expecting as a pet owner.

My cats "issues" are what I love about cats.

They are strange, eccentric, sometimes almost anal ;) , very very lovable, not expected to be normal, human beings.

Kinda just like us.

My husband was also a stray, with MAJOR issues hehe heh ;) and look how good he turned out!!

Sorry for throwing humor in there, to sum it up, I PREFER strays to taking in someone else's "freaked out house cat" (so true, LR)

kandy
June 27th, 2005, 06:36 PM
We had some friends who had a mentally disabled cat. She hit her head (hard) when she was young, and apparently it caused some permanent damage. The cat lived a fairly normal, happy life although she did have some balance problems (she could never land on her feet, so you had to keep her from trying to jump off of anything) and she had problems with the litter box because she had really bad balance. I don't remember if she had problems with cleaning herself or not. As far as changing vets, I agree that this is a professional service you are paying for and if you are not satisfied that you are getting good service - it's not a crime to go elsewhere. I changed vets because I didn't like the way he treated my dog. He was never very gentle with them. He never misdiagnosed any of them, I just didn't like his bedside manner, so I switched. If I wasn't entirely confident in my vets abilities, I would switch again (although I would have to go to the next town over since we only have the two in town!). Good Luck with this poor kitty!

5willow
June 27th, 2005, 08:08 PM
Does your kitty have a name, by the way? And -- I'm wondering how much time does she spend outside percentage-wise? Is she more outside than inside and you're simply bringing her in at night or whatever? :)

Her name is Rocco. (My son named her). Both my cats sleep most the time, inside. They get up when I do, roam around outside or inside until I am ready to leave for work, then find their spot to snooze for the day. Either my son or husband are there during the day, so that's how I know. When I get off work, they are waiting for me out side if it is nice, or watching for me out the window. Funny, how they know when to start watching! Then, they roam around again till bed time, and give me the "aren't you going to bed?" look. Then, sleep - sleep - sleep. My other cat's name (male) is Shadow. He got the name from always being my "shadow". I got Shadow as a little kitty in while we lived in California - he was our "child" back then. He was ran over by a car, and ended up damaging his right eye. He can't see out of it, and it has shrank down to 1/2 it's size - has had part of the eye lid removed later to prevent it from scratching and infecting it. We moved across country twice since then, and he came right along. I am grateful to have had great vets in those areas where we lived. We've been in the area we live now for about 3 years, and only there are only about 2 or 3 vets to choose from here. (Same goes for medical doctors and dentists, too!) I also have 2 parakeets, and 100 gal fish tank filled with tropical fish. :grouphug:

Jamgirl
July 1st, 2005, 01:53 PM
My cat was walking on our counter and something fell on her, she doesn't go on the counter anymore...


isn't this more common sense then a life altering traumatic experiance???? Why would you want a cat on the counter anyways? I don't let mine on my table or any counter top, I feel that is very unsanitary. Just in case while in the litter they keep and hitch hikers on their feet. :yuck: Don't want that there!