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'heeling' and jumping up

toby's tracy
June 14th, 2005, 11:44 PM
Hi all - my 3.5 month old puppy is doing wonderfully! He can sit and stay - and stays as long as he can see my face, he is house trained, he sleeps through the night, he loves his crate, he comes from anywhere as soon as I say 'Toby, come!', and he walks nicely, by my left side, on a loose leash... :thumbs up

...that is until another person walks by. Then he tries to jump all over them and gets himself so excited that he pees...which is a little bit embarrassing ("umm, excuse me, I am sorry, my dog has gotten excited all over your shoes! Please forgive us!" :o ). When I see a child walking towards us I will kneel next to him and put my arm around his neck to calm/restrain him, however it isn't always possible to do that - sometimes there are too many people on the sidewalk and we'll never get anywhere or sometimes I am preoccupied with him (cleaning up poop, taking a rock out of his mouth... ;) ) He is just sooooo happy to see people!

Another behaviour we are trying to stop but are not having much luck with, and it seems to be getting worse, is that he jumps up and puts his front paws on tables, counters, couches...I have been saying 'no!' and pushing him down each time I see it, but 2 seconds later he is back up there, looking for food or a toy to chew on. Not very pleasant... :( For now, he stays on a leash when he is out of his little world ('his little world' = open crate + kitchen during the day, closed crate at night), but he is also jumping up on the counters when he is in the kitchen.

Does anyone have any suggestions for curbing these 2 behaviours? He seems to learn very quickly, however my tactics so far aren't working! I am sure that if I had a good, solid strategy for each of these behaviours he would learn them in a jiffy (at least, that's what I am hoping! :fingerscr ).

Thanks for your help!

Lissa
June 15th, 2005, 01:57 PM
My puppy jumped up on people all the time too. It was very difficult to teach him NOT to jump up on strangers because I couldn't tell them to ignore him if he tried, or to cross their arms in front of his face so he couldn't jump up etc... In the end, more training helped remedy that problem - although he is still apt to jump/pull at rollerbladers and running children - not perfect yet but we're working on it! I usually get him focused on me when I see a potential distraction coming and reward him when he ignores the distraction.

Maybe get someone you know to walk by and then ignore the pup if he jumps, or you could get your pup in a sit stay and have your friend approach him - if he breaks then the friend moves away until he is calm again. Or get them to pet him before he jumps so that there is no reason for him to jump. It would probably help if you do this in your house first where there is not so much to distract your puppy. Remember to reward big time if he doesn't jump up (but not too much that it makes him get all excited and jumpy again!)

Perhaps just distracting him while you walk by people will help? I would sometimes bring food or a tug toy on a walk so that my pup would stay close and focus on the food/toy instead of jumping all over a passerby!

I've also heard that letting the dog self-correct by stepping on the end of the leash and letting them go at it until they realize it's not working. However, that is probably not the best idea with a puppy!

With reagrds to the paws on counters and tables I'm not sure...some people say that saying "no" is not the best word because it is too general. I use the word "off" and taught Dodger to apply it to all situations - like not jumping on people, getting off the bed etc...

Also since your pup knows sit-stay, why not try getting him to do that when you know he is about to misbehave. Perhaps it might make him focus on you a bit more? But if you think he's not going to listen to a sit-stay and it's just setting him up to fail, then don't do it. Work on the sit-stay a bit more, then introduce the distraction (ie: people and counters).
Good luck and hopefully someone with better advice comes along!

Writing4Fun
June 15th, 2005, 02:10 PM
It was very difficult to teach him NOT to jump up on strangers because I couldn't tell them to ignore him if he tried, or to cross their arms in front of his face so he couldn't jump up etc...
Just curious, but why couldn't you tell people to ignore him? Not trying to be "funny", I'm just curious why this is an issue...

Dogastrophe
June 15th, 2005, 02:16 PM
I would think that part of the problem with telling ppl to ignore is that you do not know how these ppl will react when your dog leaps up at them.

I have one jumper in the house (she is now down to chest height jumps from her prior head heights). When we get visitors we ask that they ignore her until she settles down, however, when on walks we cannot risk her jumping on ppl, expecially those we don't know.

We usually give hold her lead so that it will remain slack until she starts the upward move at which point she can only get about 3 inches of height. have found that putting her in a sit lessens the jumping, but now always.

Lissa
June 15th, 2005, 02:22 PM
Well being the cute little puppy that Dodger was ;) , the people who wanted to pet him were all over him right off the bat - especially little children!
I don't often make conversation with passerby's and the few times I did ask people to ignore Dodger when he was jumping, they either ignored me or got all snitty with me or didn't want to wait until Dodger has calmed down and just walked on by.
It wasn't worth it, so I stopped asking people to ignore him!

toby's tracy
June 15th, 2005, 03:59 PM
Perhaps just distracting him while you walk by people will help? I would sometimes bring food or a tug toy on a walk so that my pup would stay close and focus on the food/toy instead of jumping all over a passerby!


Thanks Lissa...I've been trying so hard to hold him back that I haven't really tried to distract him with food. Treats worked AMAZING with training him to come...after the 1st reward he was hooked! So, I'll apply the same theory to walking. Now why didn't I think of that :confused: ?????????

Oh boy, these little guys are a lot of work! Luckily he is cute and sooooo worth it. I'm very proud of how much he has learned already :thumbs up

nymph
June 16th, 2005, 11:30 AM
Ditto on Lissa's suggestions! :thumbs up

I see this as de-sensitization training. Puppies are very likely to get excited to new things, new people, and their way of showing the excitement is to jump up, sometimes even barking.

In puppy school, we learned to:

1. ignore the puppy for at least 15 minutes when we come back home, just ingore him, pretend that he's invisible. Don't say anything, don't pay any attention to him until he calms himself down, which usually takes about 2-5 minutes.

2. ask the puppy to perform *sit* command when someone is at the door, and also tell that person to ignore the puppy

As for jumping on counters and tables, keep telling him *off* then reward when his 4 paws are on the floor.

My puppy Diego has been doing very well on the de-sensitization training. He's gotten used to us, which include myself, hubby, his parents and his brother. He's doing a lot better when a friend comes, but still jumping on people when a total stranger comes to door. I guess it will take some time for the puppy to learn proper behavior. Don't get discouraged if you don't see immediate improvements, after all he is still a puppy.

You should be utterly proud of him and yourself: Diego is over 5 months old and still can't perform long *stay*, which I don't expect him to either.
Keep socializing him with other people/dogs.

toby's tracy
June 16th, 2005, 08:46 PM
1. ignore the puppy for at least 15 minutes when we come back home, just ingore him, pretend that he's invisible. Don't say anything, don't pay any attention to him until he calms himself down, which usually takes about 2-5 minutes.

And when we get home, the first thing we do is swing the kitchen door wide open and chase him outsie for a pee...with him jumping and squirting all the way - our front walk is always patterned with pee squirts, it is quite pleasant!

We're going to give this a try. Thanks!

nymph
June 20th, 2005, 01:11 PM
It sounds like your dog is having a submissive urination problem, which is quite common among male puppies. We were babysitting a golden retriever Oscar last summer, he had submissive urination problem. The way we dealt with it was also to ignore him: no eye contact, no happy talking "hey baby mommy's home!", no getting down to his level to pet him, just IGNORE. When he tried to jump up on me, I turned my back to face a corner. I also told all my visitors to ignore the dog.

Most puppies would eventually outgrow submissive urination.