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Should I put my cat to sleep?

Dee12
June 10th, 2005, 01:23 PM
I have had my cat for about 13 years. For the past week she has not been eating and all she does is sleep. She is losing a lot of weight. Is she dying? I can not afford the vet bills and will be moving away for school. My mom does not really want to take care of her and no one will adopt her. I think I should put her to sleep but wanted some feedback. Thanks.

Karin
June 10th, 2005, 01:37 PM
I have had my cat for about 13 years. For the past week she has not been eating and all she does is sleep. She is losing a lot of weight. Is she dying? I can not afford the vet bills and will be moving away for school. My mom does not really want to take care of her and no one will adopt her. I think I should put her to sleep but wanted some feedback. Thanks.

NO! Do what you can...have you called a vet? Please try..please !

Dogastrophe
June 10th, 2005, 01:43 PM
you will still have to pay a vet fee (most vet visits are in the $45 to $60 range) to do the alternative so why not go to the vet to ensure that all hope for a recovery is not lost.

BMDLuver
June 10th, 2005, 01:44 PM
I think after 13 years that you at least owe this cat a vet visit. If you can afford to move away to school then perhaps the first couple of weeks at school you have to scrimp a little in order to help your cat but letting your companion fade away slowly is just not acceptable.

Beaglemom
June 10th, 2005, 02:11 PM
I agree with the others. All hope is not lost. Please take your cat to the vet and have her examined. An examination fee is not that much. Much less than having her pts. Don't give up on her after 13 years, it's just not fair to her.

Lissa
June 10th, 2005, 02:35 PM
Please don't just put her to sleep, it could be something that's easily treatable. You can surely afford a consultation!? Your cat may not need expensive treatment, please give her a chance!

justncase
June 10th, 2005, 04:53 PM
Actually, you seem to be asking two questions. One is a question of convenience and the other is a question of health. Is it more " convenient" for you to put down your cat? The answer to that question has nothing to do with the answer to the question concerning your cat's health. Is your cat sick enough to put down? Lets' see. no vomiting, no diarrhea, no convulsions, - your cat just seems to sleep more. And at the age of 13 years( which is no small feat) has your cat earned the right to that? If you don't feel you can leave your cat, there is a middle step. I see you live in California. Try a search of cat havens in california(if you don't know how I'll do it for you-pm me) for one who would be glad to allow your cat to live out her remaining life in the peace and comfort.

Lucky Rescue
June 10th, 2005, 05:49 PM
Your cat is 13, has stopped eating and is thin. This could be something easily fixable or not.

If no one wants to, or can, take her to a vet to get the care she needs and deserves, then please don't let her suffer and die slowly.

At the bare minimum, you owe it to her to have her die peacefully by humane injection at the vet, for which someone will have to pay.

Shamrock
June 10th, 2005, 06:07 PM
Maybe you are thinking that at 13 she has reached the average expected life span? Cats live longer than dogs, up to twenty in some cases. A thirteen year old cat is a senior cat, yes, but may have many good years ahead.
This could be something very treatable.
She needs a vet check to see what is going on. Please take her!

SnowDancer
June 10th, 2005, 06:39 PM
I would first have the cat examined by your regular vet - I feel it important that your cat be evaluated by someone who knows the cat and you. If condition requires inexpensive treatment I would proceed with such treatment. If your new accommodations allow you to have a cat I would take the cat with me - if not, consider different accommodations if feasible. This is a very common situation. Children get cats and dogs that live with the family for many, many years. Said children consider the pet "theirs" - until it is time to go away to school, at which time the animal becomes the "family" pet - only the "family" decides the pet is in fact the child's.

WhKnight
June 10th, 2005, 09:51 PM
I had this concern with one of my cats in the past...I would definitely agree with those who say give the vet a try. Some compassionate vets will understand your money situation and may let you pay your bill over time, rather than completely at the time of service. The worst they can say is no...but perhaps they can recommend somewhere where you can get service for your pet.

Good luck!

justncase
June 11th, 2005, 04:47 PM
Many elderly cats are thin and sleep alot. It doesn't necessarily mean they are sick. If money is a concern check out these sites. Also if you do go to a vet to have your cat checked out think twice if he/she wishes to update the vaccinations. A very famous vet, Dr. Allan Shoen, DVM has always remarked- never vaccinate the old, the sick or the very young. In fact, it's now being found out that unless a pet is in a high-risk area- it's not even necessary to have boosters- it ends up doing more harm than good and most pets have enough of the vaccine in their system to do for their entire lives- just like for people)
Acme House of Cats--they have an Acme Fund
cat discussions regarding questions, rescue, health, help, stories, and pictures.
members5.boardhost.com/AcmeHouseOfCats/ - 94k - 6 Jun 2005 - Cached - Similar pages

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