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Confused & not sure how to handle- hoping someone has similiar experience!!

cindi11764
June 6th, 2005, 09:24 AM
Princess is a 13 year old Lab mix. She has been having problems with heavy breathing, constant thirst , and diluted urine. She was treated for Lyme disease about 1 year ago and also had a growth on her leg that had to be removed.

The Vet's first thought was Cushings Diesease. We have had 4 urine tests(they basically are water so they aren't helping him) , 2 blood tests, and a procedure where the dog is shot with cortisone and blood is taken to see how it is processed. All the tests came back negative for Cushings.

They now want us to leave her at a vet she is unfamiliar with for an ultrasound.
We have mixed feeling about this as Princess is not feeling well and we don't want to torture her with tests if they aren't going to help her.

We are also confused as to the focus on Cushings when all the tests are coming back negative. We don't understand why not a lung x-ray as she is breathing quite heavily and has a tumor on her leg previously.

Have anyone has a similiar situation? Princess is the best dog we ever had. We want to do what is right. I don't want to hurt her but I also don't want her to remain ill if we can treat her.

Any Ideas (sorry for the longggggggg message)???

BMDLuver
June 6th, 2005, 09:28 AM
Has diabetes been ruled out? If you are uncomfortable about leaving her for an ultrasound then request that you be present with her during the procedure. I know I would or at least be able to wait for her in the waiting room.

raingirl
June 6th, 2005, 09:40 AM
from what I understand cushings is VERY hard to diagnose.

Maybe they are doing an ultrasound to see if there are any bumps/lumps (cancer) in her belly or possibly her bladder.

Excessive thirst/urination are signs of diabetes. Heavy breathing can be a sign of congestive heart failure which I beleive and ultrasound can find as well.

I think you need to have the ultrasound done ASAP.

Beaglemom
June 6th, 2005, 10:18 AM
An ultrasound will rule out many things and help diagnosis. Chest X-rays might also be suggested.

Dogs experiencing heart failure also drink a lot of water, pant heavily, have a pot belly and tire easily. They also cough a lot.

A simply urine test and blood test will help rule out diabetes.

I do believe that an ultrasound and even x-ray will help in determining the cause of your dog's distress.

Karin
June 6th, 2005, 05:37 PM
An ultrasound will rule out many things and help diagnosis. Chest X-rays might also be suggested.

Dogs experiencing heart failure also drink a lot of water, pant heavily, have a pot belly and tire easily. They also cough a lot.

A simply urine test and blood test will help rule out diabetes.

I do believe that an ultrasound and even x-ray will help in determining the cause of your dog's distress.

My first thought was congestive heart failure. In the early stages there may be no coughing or fluid buildup in the abdomen. Xrays would not be my first choice in diagnostics but an ultrasound would be.

Beaglemom
June 7th, 2005, 08:36 AM
Karin, I too agree that an ultrasound is extremely important and would help tremendously in diagnosing the problem. If signs are pointing to congestive heart failure, wouldn't an EKG be a good idea too?

Karin
June 7th, 2005, 12:22 PM
Karin, I too agree that an ultrasound is extremely important and would help tremendously in diagnosing the problem. If signs are pointing to congestive heart failure, wouldn't an EKG be a good idea too?

Of course it would be very helpful. I would start with the ultasound first, there may be no need to go any further. The cost involved with all the diagnostics available can overwhelm many. Even in my area, with a local vet teaching college and many specialist around we have only one canine heart specialist and it is too costly for many. Start out simple. I have seen so many pet owners run the entire route and come back to the same conclusion, only to find themselves broke with little or no money left for treatment and the poor dog exhausted & stressed from all of it. There is a test for everything these days and a vet willing to run them, one thing all vet's can improve on is looking beyond just the patient and find out what tools and treatment can suit the owners too. I can tell you from experience...tools of the trade, (diagnostic , etc) are toys for vet hospitals, especially when they are new to them. Of course these "toy's" need to be paid for somehow. It never hurts to start out simple.
If chf was suspected I would have the ultrasound, if the heart appeared enlarged and fluid was present, Rx lasix and rest and go from there.
Just my opinion.