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Can pets get each other sick? (i.e. cat to dog)

fangfoo
May 29th, 2005, 03:03 PM
So we have a new household with a cat and a dog. Haven't seen the vet since we melded our home (I know I should but was waiting for the annual checkup) anyway, our dog has what appears to be a stomach/intestine infection that is giving him diarriaha for a week now. The vet gave us some medecine to help dog dog.

This morning (a little over a week later) our cat had some loose stool when I was cleaning out the litter box.

So just wondering besides the standard vaccinations for multi-animal households, anyone know for sure there are others required for mixed multi-animal households? Or if it's even possible for a cat or dog to give another dog or cat their sickness?

I saw this thread:

http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=15484

but googling "can our pets infect us" yields a bunch of posts on many sites from vets indicating there is only a small subset of possible diseases/sicknesses that we can pass back and fourth. This is also backed up by a few pet books I have here. Googling "can a dog infect a cat" pulls up mostly the same links. Anyway sorry for hijacking my own thread. Thanks!

FF

Lucky Rescue
May 29th, 2005, 03:14 PM
Most disease are species specific and cannot be passed from cat to dog or vice versa.

Two I can think of that CAN be passed are rabies and leptospirosis. Disease like parvo and kennel cough cannot be. Distemper is either canine or feline and also cannot be passed. Most feline disease - rhino, FeLV, FIV etc does not affect dogs.

Of course, any type of parasite or worm can be spread to different species.

Someone else may know more about this!

Karin
May 29th, 2005, 04:28 PM
What Lucky Rescue said.


Where are you located?


Giardia is another concern.

fangfoo
May 29th, 2005, 05:11 PM
Thanks lucky.

Karin do you mean this?

"Every year many people return from camping trips to find that they are suffering from giardiasis, but the source of these infections remains uncertain. Some authorities believe that Giardia infects a number animals other than humans, particularly beavers, and that campers contract giardiasis from drinking stream water contaminated with cysts from beavers (hence, "beaver fever"). Other authorities, however, believe that these cases result from streams contaminated with human feces. Although mountain streams may appear to be "sparkling clean," some camper upstream may be using your drinking water as a toilet! Thus, no matter what it looks like, stream water should be treated before drinking. Boiling will kill Giardia cysts, and there are commercially available filters that will remove the cysts from water."

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dpd/parasites/giardiasis/factsht_giardia.htm

So in summary, if a pet eats other animals feces, they are susceptible to a select sicknesses (or water infected via contaminated feces). But from what I've read it doesn't appear that "cat" can have an infectious sickness that crosses to "dog" or "people" without a carrier, and vice versa. Asain bird flu excepted. ;) So outdoor "dog" won't infect "indoor" cat in most cases.

Karin
May 29th, 2005, 08:03 PM
Thanks lucky.

Karin do you mean this?

"Every year many people return from camping trips to find that they are suffering from giardiasis, but the source of these infections remains uncertain. Some authorities believe that Giardia infects a number animals other than humans, particularly beavers, and that campers contract giardiasis from drinking stream water contaminated with cysts from beavers (hence, "beaver fever"). Other authorities, however, believe that these cases result from streams contaminated with human feces. Although mountain streams may appear to be "sparkling clean," some camper upstream may be using your drinking water as a toilet! Thus, no matter what it looks like, stream water should be treated before drinking. Boiling will kill Giardia cysts, and there are commercially available filters that will remove the cysts from water."

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dpd/parasites/giardiasis/factsht_giardia.htm

So in summary, if a pet eats other animals feces, they are susceptible to a select sicknesses (or water infected via contaminated feces). But from what I've read it doesn't appear that "cat" can have an infectious sickness that crosses to "dog" or "people" without a carrier, and vice versa. Asain bird flu excepted. ;) So outdoor "dog" won't infect "indoor" cat in most cases.


Giardia is very common here in the tropical climates. However, the Beavers you copy/pasted this article from is not native to Florida...you must be thinking of the "other kind"... Beavers are not indigenous to Florida.
Spring break teenager's are..

Back to the topic at hand...standing water puddles, common dog walks etc...

other infected dogs, cats..the list goes on. Hmm, someone else here always stresses on research......just who might that be?