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What kind of schooling do I need!

Princesss04
May 27th, 2005, 01:44 PM
Okay you all I am gonna go back to school, I had one year of college, but did nto finish due to the fact I got married. Anyway I am thinking about going and being a vet's asst. I have looked into online stuff! I would like to be able to do it at home and on the computer. Does anyone know what all is needed and if this is a route I should go. Or should I take it even farther and just go to be a vet. I also thought about being an RN does anyone know anything about this. How long it takes to get this degree can I do it all online, etc. Thanks in advance for all the help. :D

Sneaky2006
May 27th, 2005, 01:48 PM
The school I'm going through has a vet assistant program but I still don't know if most vets take it as real school or not because it's all done from home, although it is claimed to be a real school.

kandy
May 27th, 2005, 01:56 PM
I you plan to do a degree online, beware of diploma mills. I have worked at our local community college for 6 years - and I worked most of that in the registrar's office so I happen to know quite a bit about this. Any online school that says you can get a degree in anything biology related (which is what a vet tech or RN would be) totally online is lying. You still need to have the hands on part of the schooling (lab work). How can you learn to take blood totally online, with no actual practice? You can't - at least not properly. We don't have a vet program at our school, but we do have an RN program, so I'll concentrate on that. We offer a three year degree in Nursing, after which, you can take the state licensing exam to become an RN. After the first year, you would be qualified to take the test for a Certified Nursing Assistant. Although alot of the general education courses can be taken online - almost none of the nursing courses are online - again because of the hands on stuff. When you check an online program, make sure you check to make sure the school is actually accredited. If the page says something about "limited transferability of credits" then stay away - that means that either they are not accredited at all, or that only certain programs are accredited. If a school offers you a bachelor's degree in six months for a certain amount of money - it is a diploma mill. I just read an article in Reader's digest about a cat who now has a masters in business administration from a diploma mill. If you find someplace and want to know if it's accredited, let me know and I can check it out for you.

kandy
May 27th, 2005, 01:57 PM
The school I'm going through has a vet assistant program but I still don't know if most vets take it as real school or not because it's all done from home, although it is claimed to be a real school.

They can claim anything they want - doesn't mean that a degree or certificate from them means squat in the real world. PM me the name of the school, and I'll check it out for you.

Lizzie
May 27th, 2005, 01:58 PM
I would contact the local or regional veterinary association to find out what you need. Often schools will offer a ton of programs that sound good but aren't really valuable in the work force.

Here in Canada you take your Vet Tech course through a regcognized college---in person--as the program includes a lot of lab work.

Becoming a veterinarian in Ontario means spending two years at an university in science and then another 4 years at the veterinary college.

Here's what I found about the US:

How do you become a veterinary technician?

Vet techs must complete a veterinary technology program accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association.

Veterinary Technician Programs generally consist of two years of academic study, resulting in a certificate, diploma, or an Associate of Science degree. (Four-year vet tech degrees are available at some institutions.)

In addition, all states have vet tech credentialing regulations (licensing, certification, registration). Veterinarian technician competency is usually measured by an examination overseen by the State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners or other appropriate agencies.

There are two programs currently offering complete Distance Education courses of study that lead to a degree in Veterinary Technology. St. Petersburg Junior College in Florida provides a computer-based program. Blue Ridge Community College in Virginia has a live compressed video program. Both programs require students to work with veterinarians during the time they are completing their degree requirements.

Check with other individual colleges to see if they offer non-traditional courses. More programs are starting to offer some of their program courses over the internet and some programs are providing instruction in the evenings.

Lizzie
May 27th, 2005, 02:02 PM
One other thing to note is that the program will take you much longer to complete if you do it through distance education.

Distance education also calls for a person with extremely high motivation levels, time management and organization. You must be able to keep on track without much help, and have a good understanding of the quality of work sought in a college/university program. They are not for everyone.

It would be faster for you if you were to attend full time for two years. Distance could take you four or five years if you don't take a full course load (and most dont). The sooner you are done the sooner you can get to work!

Princesss04
May 27th, 2005, 02:13 PM
Lizzie I know what you mean I am struggling with whether I should quit my job and go back to school or do an online course and still work I am not sure what to do. I get off at 4:30 So I could devote the rest of my time to school online. I really think I would rather be an RN but not sure. I am not sure if I could handle seeing sick animals all the time. So sad! I have always said I would be a nurse when I grew up. LOL Guess I need to get on the ball. :D

Blaze01
May 27th, 2005, 03:23 PM
Go talk to someone at your local community college...they usually have lots of information.

Princesss04
May 27th, 2005, 03:25 PM
I already called and left a message but I am sure I will not hear from someone until Tuesday due to the holiday! :D

Prin
May 27th, 2005, 04:00 PM
You did one year of college right? The vet tech courses here have prerequisites like Chem 101, chem 201, Organic chemistry 1, Three Physics: Mechanics, Electricity and Magnetism, Modern Physics and optics, Calculus 1, cal 2, biology 301 (basic evolution and biodiversity)....

If they need those and you're missing some (might be completely different in On than Qc and even more different in the States), then you have to make them up first.

Unless you're a super straight A student, you'll be quite disappointed if you try to be a vet. Maybe it's easier in the States, but I have been trying to get into the French university here, but my marks are not high enough. There are only 4 vet schools in Canada, and seating is very limited. The school here gets 800 applications and only 80 get in. UPEI is restricted to Atlantic residents only, USask, restricted to Western students only. Guelph has a few more seats, I don't know how many because I gave up applying there years ago-- they only have 2 places for Quebecers, and frankly my marks are not in the top 2.

Beaglemom
May 27th, 2005, 04:09 PM
I'm not sure how it works in the states, but here in Canada to be a vet tech you go through community college. It is the best route to take, not online courses. Online degrees/diplomas are frowned upon because you may have the book knowledge, but not practical knowledge and that is extremely important!

To be a vet, here in Ontario anyway, you need prerequisite courses at the university level. Once those are complete you can apply to vet school. It is highly competitive as Prin stated. Most vet students have a bachelors degree before they even applied to vet school.

Also, here in Ontario, many of the schools require that you have previous experience working at a veterinary hospital/clinic. They also require that you submit an application with references.

Sneaky2006
May 27th, 2005, 09:32 PM
They can claim anything they want - doesn't mean that a degree or certificate from them means squat in the real world. PM me the name of the school, and I'll check it out for you.They are accredited, at least they say they are!
This is from their site...
Professional Career Development Institute offers nationally accredited, self-paced distance learning programs at a price you can afford. Learn a new career, earn your high school diploma or associateís or masterís degree in the comfort of home. Look at www.pcdi.com

SnowDancer
May 28th, 2005, 08:13 AM
I see advertisements for on-line and home study courses to learn how to become an airplane mechanic. There is a scary thought. I am afraid I feel the same way about vet tech and RN courses - you need the hands-on training in a school. Certainly as has been pointed out, in Ontario it is extremely difficult to get into vet school - Guelph in this case. Practically a closed shop. Also you should speak with your vet about possible employment opportunities. Years ago and I mean 1971 the community college I attended did start a 2 year vet tech program. The classes were booked to capacity, but employment opportunties did not exist at the pay rates expected.

kandy
May 28th, 2005, 12:35 PM
"Nationally accredited" doesn't mean the school itself is accredited. It means that it may have the blessing of an organization that oversees some of the programs. Even online diploma mills will say that they are accredited, but if you search for who they are accredited through, it turns out to be "Bob's house of Ribs" or something (exaggerating just slightly there - diploma mills really burn my butt). Tech schools are great for just learning what you need to learn for a specific occupation, but they won't give you the general education courses that you need to actually get a degree. If you go to a tech school, and then decide you want to go to a college, all the classes you took at the tech school will have to be repeated (with a few exceptions). You want to look for the school itself to be fully accredited, and then look for specific programs to have additional accreditation from organizations like a state board of nursing. So if you went to a Nursing tech school, and then decided that you would actually like to be a child psychologist or something, you would have to basically start all over again.
Here's a link to the US Dept of Education that has some good information about Tech schools and also lists all the recognized accrediting agencies:
http://www.ed.gov/students/prep/college/consumerinfo/index.html

Crazy Hippie
May 29th, 2005, 11:34 AM
I didn't read all the replies so maybe I missed this but what country do you live in? I'm going into nursing in September (in Canada) and here it's a 4-year program and we have to have senior highschool credits in bio, english, and chem. I just finished a 4-yr degree in sociology but I've always felt drawn to the medical field. After the RN program there is something called the "nurse practitioner" program which is 1-2 yrs and if you complete this you can be a practitioner, like a family doctor. We're losing a lot of doctors to the states so doctors are really in demand here...not that you'd want to do this but this is my plan..it pays really good too!
I actually thought of going to vet school too. I didn't want to be a vet tech but I checked out veterinarian schooling and you need so much chem and math, and here you have to write the MCAT (medical college admissions test) and ohhhh I failed chem already once in university! There are so many areas of nursing and that's really what I like about it. Let us know what you decide to do!

Karin
May 29th, 2005, 04:49 PM
I see advertisements for on-line and home study courses to learn how to become an airplane mechanic. There is a scary thought. I am afraid I feel the same way about vet tech and RN courses - you need the hands-on training in a school. Certainly as has been pointed out, in Ontario it is extremely difficult to get into vet school - Guelph in this case. Practically a closed shop. Also you should speak with your vet about possible employment opportunities. Years ago and I mean 1971 the community college I attended did start a 2 year vet tech program. The classes were booked to capacity, but employment opportunties did not exist at the pay rates expected.

On line college degrees are just that here in the US. Good luck getting a job if this is how you get your diploma. There are so many vet colleges spitting out accredited techs theses days, most work for vets already...you can't beat on the job training with a sign off. Plus, with two more years most techs can finish with a few classes and be a licensed vet.

As far as airframe & powerplant mechanics...forget that too. Hogwash....anyone who sends money to these on line people better read the fine line...vet techs included.

These people will gladly take your money...if it sounds too good to be true., it usually is.

Prin
May 29th, 2005, 05:54 PM
I wish here you could become a vet through vet tech classes... You can't though. You do 3 years of vet tech, then 3-4 years of vet school (IF you can get IN). :sad: