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Respect ma authoritay!

Daisy's Owner
May 26th, 2005, 06:12 AM
Sorry, I couldn't resist. When I thought about starting this thread, South Park immediately came to mind, hence the title.

I need to get a dog voice. Or be more authoritative. Or just plain get Daisy to know I am the boss.

Daisy is a very very good dog. She listens and does all her commands when she is told. Except... The couple of issues I have are that she is still barking and growling at people, ie protecting me. (This comes from the trainer) And leash pulling. I need to also mention that Daisy will walk in a perfect heel with both of the trainers, but not for me. And, they have only walked her a couple of times each. So, I know I am training Daisy well. They are not doing anything physically that I am not trying to do. It is just their presence I guess. One of the trainers said the other night that I sound too nice.

As far as the barking goes, this needs to stop immediately. Or Daisy is going to get kicked out of the campground and that just can't happen. Unfortunately, against all my better judgement, I bought a bark collar. I have used it a couple of times to try and get the message across but I need to work on this issue without the collar. Because I just hate the darn things.

I also think there is a little bit of a confidence issue with Daisy as well. I have noticed that when someone is brave enough to get passed the barking she gets a little timid with people as well.

After saying all this. I whole heartedly know the issue is with me and not Daisy.

Can someone help train me please.

raingirl
May 26th, 2005, 08:48 AM
My BF (and sometimes me) are the same. I have got a lot better though.

It's all about body language. Sometimes when Odin is being "nippy" we are supposed to stand up immediately and say "No Bite" very firm. My BF tends to hunch over and not be that firm, so if I'm there I remind him stand up straight and be firm. Usually works.

I just make sure I do everything in an "angry" voice...low and unwavering.

Princesss04
May 26th, 2005, 09:44 AM
There is alot of time if the boys are fighting (playing) and I tell them to stop they just keep on but when Justin does buddy the stop! :D

Copper'sMom
May 26th, 2005, 10:22 AM
I love that line from South Park!!

I growl "Ouuut" at my dogs when they are getting out of hand or doing something they aren't supposed to do. It takes alot for me to get that growly voice out, but it sure does work like a charm! Some days, I just don't have it in me, but other days, the rest of the pack knows I'm in charge! I do it best when I'm at home alone with them. At work, I don't want to scare people!! J/K

You just have to remind yourself, that YOU are the leader of the pack, the mother dog! This works for me!

Daisy's Owner
May 26th, 2005, 10:37 AM
I'll have to work on my growly voice and watch my posture. The more I think about it, the more I come to realize that I have to work on my own confidence level as a handler. This I think is my issue.

nymph
May 26th, 2005, 10:51 AM
I'm the same! Either I SCREEEEEAAAAM or my dog would just ignore my command, not all the time, but sometimes. He listens to daddy very well though. I can't seem to get that low authoritative voice out of me, it's rather exhausting to have that low and mean voice.

LavenderRott
May 26th, 2005, 11:07 AM
I doubt the barking and growling at stangers is really "protecting" you, especially since you state that she has a confidence problem and once you get past the growling she acts timid. It is more likely a SELF defense mechanism for her.

You may well find that once she has gotten further along in her training she becomes more confident. Part of that will be because you have learned to read her body language better and can tell when she is getting stressed out.

Safyre
May 26th, 2005, 11:07 AM
my dog listens to me, and only me. She doesn't protect me. If i am home alone with her, she curls up on my lap or in her crate and sleeps, if someone knocks at the door, with me, she just sists there. She knows I am alhpa and can protect myself.
If either of my parents are home, she protects them. She feels that they need to be protected, and she never listens to thier commands. I see it as going hand in hand. She doesn't know that they are higher in pack order than she is. I have to work with them in regards to that... but my mom lickes to just suck up the dog, and never gives her commands... my step dad always bends down to give commands so she don't listen. its frustrating.

kandy
May 26th, 2005, 11:31 AM
Because I am much smaller than my hubby, I taught Lacey not to jump on me whereas he would tap his chest so that she would jump on him! She would've knocked me over if I let her do that! It took her a long time to realize that she couldn't jump on me, I think because we were giving her mixed signals. Like if you let your dog go through the doorway before you, you are indicating they have a higher pack order than you, but then you don't want them pulling on the leash and can't understand why they aren't getting it! I know that if you are walking behind Hazel, she won't look ahead of her, she keeps looking at your feet (and then she runs into things :p ). Her body language tells me that she thinks I should be in front, and she's right!

Prin
May 26th, 2005, 11:53 AM
Heh heh.. I have the other problem. It's easier for me because I have the mid range to the low range of voice (not the high- hence no praising ability). My voice is ONLY commanding... I had to teach my doggies the WORDS so they would know the difference between yellnig and praise...

Can you make your voice deep and low but still forceful? My boyfriend has a problem with sounding cheerful in whatever he says... I'm trying to teach him to project his voice farther and more powerfully... (Maybe he'll teach me to be nicer?)

What if you just use consistent wording? So they understand what the bad words are? Would that work?

As for body language... At our park, the doggies KNOW right off the bat who the submissive people are. There are a couple of women who get jumped on be every single dog. They obviously view her as near the bottom of the pack. Maybe it would be better to videotape yourself to see what you're doing now?

SarahLynn123
May 26th, 2005, 12:04 PM
I have this problem also. We have all the dogs in our room at night and a baby gate on the door. I get 2 of the three in and while Im getting the third dog, Belle will jump over and head downstairs followed by Shadow. Then I have to get them all over again. They pulled this stunt on Graydon the other day and he walked down to the bottom of the stairs where they could both see him, pointed up the stairs and said "upstirs....NOW"

He spoke 2 words and the buggars jump to there feet, fly up the stairs over the gate and into their beds!

I need to work being more forceful.

nymph
May 26th, 2005, 12:06 PM
When Diego does something bad and I tell him "NO" and point my finger at him, he KNOWS he just did something wrong and he would lie down but would make a really loud, grumpy and unhappy noise like a rebellious teenager. I have to try hard not to laugh, I probably shouldn't but it is pretty funny. His facial expression is just like a teenager.

levimh
May 26th, 2005, 01:46 PM
nymph, I know what you mean. It is hard not to laugh. Levi does the exact same thing. After I've said "no", he'll slump down on the floor and make this grumble noise, like he's mumbling under his breath. Too cute.

Daisy's Owner
May 26th, 2005, 02:06 PM
I doubt the barking and growling at stangers is really "protecting" you, especially since you state that she has a confidence problem and once you get past the growling she acts timid. It is more likely a SELF defense mechanism for her.


That's an interesting thought. Can you explain this a little more? Sort of from her point of view.

Like if you let your dog go through the doorway before you, you are indicating they have a higher pack order than you, but then you don't want them pulling on the leash and can't understand why they aren't getting it!

Now this I am very guilty of. I will have to put a stop to this immediately.

LavenderRott
May 26th, 2005, 02:20 PM
If you stop and think about it - a scared animal will puff itself out and make itself seem bigger then it is to scare off whatever it is threatened by. Cats stand on their tippy toes, all their hair stands on end and they hiss. Dogs bark and growl so that they seem ferocious.

So, when someone your dog doesn't know approaches him, the hair on his scruff stands him (to make him look bigger) and he barks and growls. Usually, whoever is approaching will back away and leave. HAH! He has successfully scared off that which he was afraid of! Well, if it worked once it will work again right?

You can work on this by enlisting people you know (but the dog doesn't) to meet the dog and offer treats. Teaching him that strangers equal good things - not a correction from mom.

I believe that sometime ago there was a thread about desensitising your dog to groups of people. Like parking your car in a parking lot and sitting in it with the door open. Or sitting under a tree at the park - close enough to be able to see and hear what is going on but far enough away that the dog isn't nervous. Move closer to the action a little bit at a time until - voila - the dog isn't nervous at all! Be sure to watch your dogs body language and do this at the dogs pace. Don't push.

nymph
May 26th, 2005, 02:49 PM
nymph, I know what you mean. It is hard not to laugh. Levi does the exact same thing. After I've said "no", he'll slump down on the floor and make this grumble noise, like he's mumbling under his breath. Too cute.

I know, it brings me to smile even just reading your reply. :) I wish I had a digital video recording so that I could make a short mpeg file to share.

The problem is: he only does this with me, never with daddy, perhaps I need to be scarier when I discipline him. :rolleyes:

Just another note following LavenderRott's wonderful advice: in puppy class we learned to just IGNORE the pup when we come home for at least 15 minutes, it has been working very well for us. When Diego tries to jump up, I turn my back on him and face the wall, after only a few seconds, he'd just walk away. I don't pet him until he's completely calm. We also tell all our guests to ignore him, some do but some don't. My parents kept telling Diego to "get down", guess what, since he was getting all that attention, of course he's not going to get down! Grrrrr, it was very frustrating!

Daisy's Owner
May 26th, 2005, 02:50 PM
So, when someone your dog doesn't know approaches him, the hair on his scruff stands him (to make him look bigger) and he barks and growls. Usually, whoever is approaching will back away and leave. HAH! He has successfully scared off that which he was afraid of! Well, if it worked once it will work again right?


That does make sense. I will definitely make sure I have lots of treats on hand for strangers. I will also see if I can find that thread about desensitizing. Thanks for the explanation.

doggy lover
May 27th, 2005, 07:48 AM
I'v been reading the book The Dog Listener by Jan Fennell she addresses alot of the problems that you have been having. Like with your dog barking and growling at people it is because he doesn't think that you are the pack leader so it feels that he has to protect you as he is the leader. It can make timid dogs aggressive and confused as they are not really ready or want to be leader, but you lead them no choice. Alot of what she says is true, and its a non-agressive way of training your dog, helps with jumping up on people too.

Daisy's Owner
May 27th, 2005, 08:15 AM
Thanks for the book suggestion. I might have to go find some doggy books and read over the summer. I am just finishing up my courses for the year, so I don't usually have much time to read for fun.