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TEACUP Dog

Melanye
May 5th, 2005, 02:27 AM
Where in Canada preferable Quebec or ontario I could get some Teacup breed. The only place I found so far that i would trust is in Florida Wich I dont have time for now . Does anyone knows a trusty place near with Teacup dog and not chiwawa. Maybe Yorkshir or maltais please not a place with shipping and stuff does poor little are so fragile they migth die at the shipping its just cruel .
thanks hope to get an answer
Melanye

Eleni
May 5th, 2005, 05:09 AM
what breed?

Eleni

Beaglemom
May 5th, 2005, 07:29 AM
Please be aware that there really is no such thing as a "teacup" per se. Basically it is a toy breed that is bred to be very small. For example, a "teacup poodle" is really just a very small toy poodle.

There are many small toy breeds. Like the chihuahua and the maltese. These tend to be advertised as teacup. I don't believe that a reputable breeder would call their toys teacup.

You have to be very careful from whom your purchase your puppy from.

Safyre
May 5th, 2005, 10:00 AM
My aunt bought a teacup chi from a breeder around Niagra for over $2000 ...
unfortunateyl, the cat wasn't soo fond of it, and it turned into a $2000 snack.
The point of my story: Be careful what you wish for. Why get something soo small andd defensless? Why can't you get a normal Toy breed?

Lizzie
May 5th, 2005, 10:27 AM
Check this site out for information on all breeds. It's been posted for a few others, and personally, it's a really great site. It can help you learn the true facts about breeds...and help you decide what will fit your lifestyle best.

http://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/

Don't just go out and pick up the first "teacup" dog you find. Each breed is very different---though all extremely fragile and not good to be around kids as the kids tend to hurt them.

If you want a small dog after doing your research, consider adopting from a rescue or going through a reputable breeder (ie--not a breeder who lists their dogs in the newspaper, on online postings, who breeds multiple kinds of dogs, or who calls their dogs "teacup").

Small dogs can have many health problems so paying more to get a dog from good pedigree will help save you the financial pain of caring for it's health needs later, not to mention the emotional pain of watching your dog suffer.

Prin
May 5th, 2005, 10:48 AM
Another anecdote on "teacups"-- a friend of mine's chi went swimming in mid-August and died of hypothermia. These dogs are so fragile. Why not get a big rat instead? A big rat would be smarter and more robust (might have a shorter life span though).

Writing4Fun
May 5th, 2005, 11:17 AM
The term "teacup" is a marketing ploy used by puppy mills to sell their underbred, out of standard dogs. All breeds have standards for size, shape, colour, etc... "Teacups" are dogs that don't fit into those standards. Why are they so small? Most times, it's because there is something wrong with the pup. They are plagued with all the usual health issues of their breed, plus the additional health issues of having a body that's smaller than it should be and so usually cannot handle the rigours of daily life. They also frequently have the complications of dwarfism to deal with. If you want a toy breed, check out www.petfinder.org. If you really want to buy from a breeder, then do your research, search on-line or on this site for lists that will tell you what you should be looking for in a good breeder, get lists of breeders from the breed and kennel clubs, interview a large number of breeders, and then be prepared to go on a waiting list for your pup because good breeders don't have leftover puppies hanging around waiting to be sold.

Good luck.

mafiaprincess
May 5th, 2005, 12:41 PM
Another story: My roomie's dad is a vet. Her dad has seen 'teacup' chis and poodles who have stepped off things as small as curbsand come in with broken limbs needign to be set.

Since the breed standard for chis is 2-6 pounds, why not go to a great breeder and just buy a purebred dog that is supposed to be small, or go check petfinder and see if there is anything near you comperably little. Small breed rescues exist.

Lucky Rescue
May 5th, 2005, 02:09 PM
Why not get a big rat instead? A big rat would be smarter and more robust

You are so freakin' funny.

Karin
May 5th, 2005, 06:13 PM
The definition of teacup is hawk food.

Melanye
May 5th, 2005, 06:33 PM
I was more thinking about a York or Maltais but York I found them cute only when they are small with curli hair.

Actually the cat story i look at my cat and how spoiled she is I dont think a small dog as a tea cup would be such a good idea.

Now I am afraid she eat the dog lol...

YEah I think Ill go for toy aroud 10 pound anyways thank you for all your information it help

Shamrock
May 5th, 2005, 08:13 PM
Hi, I just wanted to say that I'm glad that you've opted for a normal toy breed size. As mentioned... there are really no Teacup dogs -Chihuaha, Yorkie or Poodle. People know this term only from its use to describe the super-small of the toy breeds. Its not recognized as any standard in size.
Their little bones can be broken SO easily. If they ever need surgery and chances are they will at some point, its really high risk. Many have a life span of only about 8 years, while an regular size toy breed can expect about 15. Almost double and among the longest of all dogs.

I have a 6-pound Toy Poodle. He was an adult rescue - I was actually looking for a "small" dog, not a miniscule one, but he stole my heart :love: I adore this little guy, but would NEVER want a dog any smaller than this. He is robust enough, and has been healthy but requires gentle handling and is NOT good with kids. He can only play at the dog park when its not busy. He wants to, but gets steamrolled by the exuberance of the larger guys in full run and having fun.
I've seen a lady with her " teacup yorkie" at a local dog park several times. This dog is about three pounds.. very adorable, but completely defenceless and totally out of place outdoors. She keeps it tucked inside her coat,all the time, and no wonder. .It couldnt begin to mingle with even small dogs, never mind the big ones. I dont know why she brings it here - a mystery to me.

I find it a bit sad - the dog is too tiny to do most outdoor doggie type things.
To me, it's like a pretty porcelain doll, fragile and delicate.
Watching the other dogs do the things it cant. :sad:

Good luck with your search!

CyberKitten
May 6th, 2005, 12:16 AM
As Lucky once noted, when you hear the term Teacup, RUN!! There is no such aninal!

adplater
May 6th, 2005, 10:27 AM
Everyone has their own choice of dog - I'm a chi owner and my chi is 1/2 the size of my cat and my chi is definitely the boss! She is a regular size though - 5lbs - I think the breed standard says that when they are shown, they are not to be over 6lbs.

Another anecdote on "teacups"-- a friend of mine's chi went swimming in mid-August and died of hypothermia. These dogs are so fragile. Why not get a big rat instead? A big rat would be smarter and more robust (might have a shorter life span though).

Different people like different things - saying a rat would be smarter than a chi? Puhleeze - let's grow up - I don't attack your dog preference!

Lucky Rescue
May 6th, 2005, 10:59 AM
saying a rat would be smarter than a chi?

Actually, rats are highly intelligent - more intelligent than dogs or cats and can solve problems no dog or cat ever could.

It's not an insult, merely a fact.

Prin
May 6th, 2005, 11:33 AM
Yes, Rats are smarter than dogs. You can train a rat to do so many things. They also eat less than a dog, don't need walks (but like them), are independent and loyal at the same time, and they don't die at the first sight of winter. My rat used to sleep with me every night. He was trained to do his business in the cage and not anywhere else. He knew his name. He could swim (didn't like that much). He could be free in the house and I knew he wouldn't run away. Wherever he was, I would call him and he would come. Not a bit of stubborness in a rat. :) And you'll turn even more heads with a rat than with a tiny suffering dog.

adplater
May 6th, 2005, 12:10 PM
Actually, rats are highly intelligent - more intelligent than dogs or cats and can solve problems no dog or cat ever could.

Didn't know that - useful information!

Yes, Rats are smarter than dogs. You can train a rat to do so many things. They also eat less than a dog, don't need walks (but like them), are independent and loyal at the same time, and they don't die at the first sight of winter. My rat used to sleep with me every night. He was trained to do his business in the cage and not anywhere else. He knew his name. He could swim (didn't like that much). He could be free in the house and I knew he wouldn't run away. Wherever he was, I would call him and he would come. Not a bit of stubborness in a rat. And you'll turn even more heads with a rat than with a tiny suffering dog.

So, my chi can do the same things as your rat - I don't get your point. Making fun of someone's choice of animal makes you feel good? Good for you then. I'm glad you feel better - my job is done!

Prin
May 6th, 2005, 12:14 PM
How is that making fun of someone's choice of animal? Stating what my rat could do doesn't say anything about what your dog can do-- it's what MY RAT CAN DO. And saying your dog is suffering--if you have to hide it in your coat all the time and if if breaks limbs jumping off the sidewalk, then yes, that's suffering.

Beaglemom
May 6th, 2005, 12:37 PM
I don't believe anyone here is making fun of someone's choice of pet. There is nothing wrong with someone preferring a toy breed. The problem arises when people start to breed dogs to be under 4 lbs and call them "teacup". Any reputable breeder of toy breeds will tell you that there is no such thing as a teacup. This is a marketing ploy as stated before by people who want to make a quick buck at the expense of an animal's life. "Teacups" tend to be sold for ridiculously high prices for a dog that isn't even close to the breed standard.

These so called "teacups" do suffer more from illnesses than their cousins of a breed standard size. They do break their little fragile bones more easily, many times they have a lot of tooth problems because they don't have the room for a full set of adult teeth. They also suffer more organ diseases and die at a younger age due to organ failure. I have a cousin who had a "teacup" maltese. She was adorable, very tiny. She couldn't even bark like a regular dog, she sounded like she had been debarked. She died of heart failure.

By the way, Prin, I love rats and I have always wanted one. I think you are doing a good job of convincing me! But, I think Misty might not agree with me, her prey instincts are way too high!

Cactus Flower
May 6th, 2005, 12:38 PM
In all fairness, I was shocked by the rat comment, too.

On another thread we all shook our heads and tsk-tsked at people making "rat" comments to those members that have toy breeds. We agreed that it was rude and hurtful.

Making such a reference to someone who has an affinity for toy breeds and is searching for one is just as rude, in my opinion. And as you can see, it has already offended a member who has a tiny dog.

A simple apology, rather than an argument about dogs vs rats, might be more effective here. Feelings have obviously been hurt, which I am sure you did not mean to do, Prin.

Shamrock
May 6th, 2005, 12:48 PM
Some people compare my dog to a rat, I guess because he is small and black This always bothers me as I get the feeling they are not meaning it in a "good way. ;)

Prin, I just would like to put in a "good word" for small dogs here.. if you will indulge me. I dont mean it as any type of 'challenge" To each their own and all that.

'they dont die at the first sight of winter". As opposed to?

The so-called teacups, any dog under five pounds, are far too fragile, and its sad and disturbing that they have such a market. But regular sized chis, poms, yorkies and other toy dogs are hearty and healthy, and enjoy very long lifespans. They are not for everyone... just as the huge dogs.. or a particular breed may not be our own individual preference.

No doubt I'm overly sensitive to this issue, but its been my experience that toy breeds often appear to the objects of ridicule - viewed not as a "real" canines, but as yappy little "rodent-like" creatures.
It's a kind of doggie discrimination - based on size alone.

"And you'll turn even more heads with a rat than with a tiny suffering dog."

Not sure where the suffering comes in... but if you are specifically lookng for a pet that will turn heads... I think a rat would indeed fill the bill nicely.

Pet rats have many fans no doubt, and its interesting to learn that they are so smart and trainable. But, I believe by most people standards, they would be considered an "unusual" pet.
They may be smart.... but... are they cuddly? ROFL! :crazy:

adplater
May 6th, 2005, 12:51 PM
I think what I'm trying to say is that there is a misconception about chi's being so fragile.

Mine dominates the cat when they're wrestling. The cat is 11 lbs - the chi 5lbs and my chi always wins hands-down.

She has no problems jumping on / off our bed (one of the higher ones where I have to jump up also to get on it).

Yes she has to wear a coat in the winter when we go for our 2, 30min walks per day. But any responsible pet owner who takes their short-haired animal out for a walk in the winter should be protecting them and putting a coat on them, same as putting boots on so the salt doesn't burn their paws.

And saying your dog is suffering--if you have to hide it in your coat all the time and if if breaks limbs jumping off the sidewalk, then yes, that's suffering

Again, carrying your dog / hiding it in your coat is a personal choice - personally it's not my style - but I've seen lots of rat owners who carry theirs around their necks, let them run around in their clothes all over their body. Is the rat then suffering? According to your definition it is.

If you are to get a very small animal - I believe it is your responsibility to take precautions to ensure that the animal does not get hurt.

Suffering? I don't see suffering, I just see alot of chi's that are spoiled rotten.

If Melanye is still looking for a small (she mentioned yorki / maltese ' chi) dog, I would go to a reputable breeder who guarantees the health of the animal.

Prin
May 6th, 2005, 12:54 PM
I don't have any issue with toy breeds and I have never called a toy breed a rat. Toy breeds are healthy and strong enough to live long, healthy lives. All I am saying is that if you want a 1 or 2 lb dog, a rat that size would be healthier and rats do make good pets. If you are a dog lover, you won't encourage this breeding extreme-- it is of no benefit to the dog to be that small and helpless.
They dont die at the first sight of winter When I had my rats people asked me all the time if they died in the winter. Rats don't die because winter comes.

Lucky Rescue
May 6th, 2005, 01:12 PM
You wouldn't believe the hateful comments I got when I had my rats, nor the ones I get now that I have a pit bull.

I think the stupidest question I had about my rats was: "Aren't you afraid they'll get out and "get you" while you sleep"? You have to learn to have a sense of humour when you have certain pets.:p

As for the Chis, my SIL has one and he is 5 lbs. He is utterly sweet and adorable, but very fragile. He broke his leg jumping off the bed. He will not go outside when it's cold at all and must use pee pads and papers.

He is a little lap dog, but also a good watchdog, and thinks nothing of herding the 5 big cats in the household around. All in all, he is a charming pet!

Cactus Flower
May 6th, 2005, 01:26 PM
There is nothing wrong with educating someone about "toy" breeding, and encouraging them to not support this practice. But making the immediate rat reference is likely to be taken as a slam on the tiny breeds. It won't be taken the same way as "Why not get a cat?" or even "why not get a pot belly pig?" LOL (hey, pigs are supposed to be even smarter than dogs :D ).

Just for the record, danes are VERY sensitive to cold. They have no undercoat and thin fur. Raj has to wear a sweater any time she is outside in the cold, or she will get sick. My best friend's dane, Mojo, has already been to the vet because he got cold, therefore sick.

And any time Raj runs on anything except grass or sand, her feet get torn up because of how heavy she is. She can't run on cement, concrete, gravel, stones/pebbles, etc. Sure, she can step off of a curb without breaking a leg. But she can't run along side it.

Then there is their tendency towards allergies and other ailments.

And we all know about their lifespan :sad: . Big body, little heart :( .

BUT, nobody looks at Danes as being a "fragile" breed, and says DON'T GET ONE.
Also, while I don't get rat comments, I get plenty of HORSE comments :p .

P.S- If I could carry Raj under my coat, I would- and she'd welcome it LOL.

Eleni
May 6th, 2005, 01:38 PM
I think everyone is being a bit sensative, I see what prin meant, she meant if you want a 2 lb animal rather then buying a 2 lb "teacup" animal then but a rat that is healthy.

Its been established that teacups are fragile. thats what i think shes talkign about, properly well bred toy breeds arent rats, but you would ahve a hard time convincing me they arent fragile, if they arent fragile how come its not a good idea to ahve them around children??

they are certainly fragile enough for me not to want one till we ahve an empty nest, my kids would most certainly injure a tiny dog.

and i dont have a large dog, Sam is a 15 LB dog, and he seems the perfect size for me.

Eleni

CyberKitten
May 6th, 2005, 02:12 PM
I have no problem with toy breeds - some people even suggest purebred animals of any kind are fragile (I get those stupid comments from ppl about my YY - "she's so small, arn;t Siamese skinny?" The word id svelte and while yes, if you like bigger Siamese, there are many appleheads in search of a home.

I do have a problem with the word "teacup" because it is used mainly by backyard breeders and puppy mills to market extra small dogs that often have health problems - one because they are bred in such horrid conditions and two because they sometimes are smaller and unhealthy.

Toy poodles for example are another matter entirely and the toy breed is recognized!

I do think it does not help to add hurtful comments.

Shamrock
May 6th, 2005, 02:32 PM
Eleni, yes, you are right. Toy dogs are fragile compared to other dog sizes. They can be injured much more easily, and must be supervised carefullly around young children. They need more careful handling, no doubt about it. Some do shake, and the short haired varieties will feel the cold more- just as a tiny person often does.

But a well-bred toy breed should not be helpless, frightened, or a weak and trembling 'sissy".
This is a commonly held misconception, a stereotype, such as the public has about many types of dogs.
Some ARE this way - no doubt. Again, it's generally the owner at fault. They may encourage helpless behaviour in their toy breeds through excessive babying -a smother-love of sorts.This incapacitates the dog and results in the clingy, nervous animal that many people believe represents all.
My Toy Poodle is more represenative of the "norm", I'd say
While he is currently under the weather.. :( in the five years I've had him.. he has been completey healthy and vigorous. He can easily walk three or four miles - rain or shine. He is hearty, healthy, spirited and unafraid.
He is tiny, but not a baby,and not treated as one. He's ALL dog..and a darn good little watchdog too!

But yes.. he is yappy, lol. I'm still working on that. :rolleyes:

Shamrock
May 6th, 2005, 02:43 PM
Lucky, adorable Chi! What a little doll!
btw... that is hilarious about the nightime "rat attacks'!! Where DO people get these ideas? :rolleyes: Too many sci-fi movies? Saw "Ben" and never recovered? :crazy:

Prin
May 6th, 2005, 02:49 PM
I often got, "Do you have the plague?" and they were serious!!! Not to mention the comments about the tail or where the rat came from or how dirty he must be...

I have to say though that the rats they sell in petstores are too old. I got my second rat at 2 weeks and he was tiny-- they almost wouldn't let me take him. I bonded with him more than any other rat I had. He was so sweet and really cared for me.

I wonder if there are rat breeders? (aside from lab rat breeders) Certainly not in Alberta... :)

Prin
May 6th, 2005, 02:50 PM
OMG there are!!
Rat Breeder in Ottawa (http://www.lilratscal.com/)

Shamrock
May 6th, 2005, 03:01 PM
The Plague, Prin?? LMBO! :D Un-believable!

CyberKitten
May 6th, 2005, 03:03 PM
There is actually a breeder of Siamese rats in Nova Scotia. I wonder if they come in Seal Point?

Lise
May 6th, 2005, 03:35 PM
They do come in seal point .I have a seal point dumbo rat,named Ellie Rat,who is an absolute doll and wanders around on my desk while I'm on computer.

Cactus Flower
May 6th, 2005, 03:46 PM
:eek: You have a SIL with an UNNEUTERED chi???? :eek:

How can that be??? You'd think that by association alone she'd have an uncanny urge to spay/neuter every pet on the block :p !

Lucky Rescue
May 6th, 2005, 04:10 PM
There are tons of rat breeders, and rats come in every colour from Dalmation to Husky, Berkshire, blue, Dumbo, etc etc.

I had a Himalayan rat named Alvis.:) He was a sweet and gentle soul!

Lucky Rescue
May 6th, 2005, 04:12 PM
You have a SIL with an UNNEUTERED chi????

No no!! That pic is of him when he arrived at the rescue, intact and VERY thin. He was neutered immediately!!:p

Cactus Flower
May 6th, 2005, 04:18 PM
*****************whew!*********************

;)

CyberKitten
May 6th, 2005, 04:57 PM
Awwww!! That is a cute rat!! Any pix of your Seal Point little one Lise? I bet s/he is cute too!!

Prin
May 6th, 2005, 08:10 PM
Wow, so many rat owners!! I would never have known!! :D

Shamrock
May 6th, 2005, 08:25 PM
Well, there's my fact for the day!
I thought they only came in gray... and white ;)
Cute little thing!

Yeah. love to see the sealpoint!

Vas
May 24th, 2005, 09:49 PM
Where in Canada preferable Quebec or ontario I could get some Teacup breed. The only place I found so far that i would trust is in Florida Wich I dont have time for now . Does anyone knows a trusty place near with Teacup dog and not chiwawa. Maybe Yorkshir or maltais please not a place with shipping and stuff does poor little are so fragile they migth die at the shipping its just cruel .
thanks hope to get an answer
Melanye

I suggest you a maltese. It's a small and sturdy dog (4-6lb) and of course beautiful.