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Want to buy a dog for my mother who is depressed

mrtwo
May 4th, 2005, 10:17 AM
I had to put down my Lab three years ago. It was extremely difficult for myself and my mother. You see, my mom never wanted us to have a dog but she ended up falling in love with her and she was the one who would take our dog for walks etc. After I moved out they grew even closer.

Well, since our dog passed my mother was diagnosed with Dystonia which causes her to shake and sometimes lose her balance causing her to stumble. She was forced to retire. We just heard from her doctor that my mother is very depressed and often tells the doctor that she thinks it's sometimes pointless to keep living. She is supposed to go for testing to make sure she does not have cancer but she is being stubborn and doesn't see the point of going anymore.

Whenever I tell her that I want to buy her a dog she protests. She says that she can barely take care of herself let a lone a dog. She told me today that one of the main reasons is that she has been through so much that she can't go through losing a pet again. But I sincerely believe that having a pet would bring her happiness again.

I am in the process of making plans to bring her a Maltese this Sunday. I told my brother and sister that I want them there and we all have to support this. My brother who still lives at home said he would help out and I will take the dog to the vet when neccessary. The breeder has agreed to let me return the dog in the case that my mom really won't accpet her, for a small fee.

Does anybody have any advice or experience with something similar? Am I doing the right thing here? I truly believe that she would be happy again, like she was when we had our Lab. She just needs to accept this puppy which will be the difficult part.

Thank you in advance.

mrtwo
May 4th, 2005, 10:18 AM
BTW, the reason why I am choosing the Maltese is because a big dog would literally drag my mother around plus, these little guys do not need to be walked and can live in an apartment if my parents move to a smaller place.

Copper'sMom
May 4th, 2005, 10:32 AM
It's truly amazing what an animal can do for the human spirit. It sounds like you all have the best intentions for your Mom and the dog. I'm glad to see the breeder will take the dog back if things don't work out. Just be sure that the dog gets the proper training and care it needs. Don't totally rely on your mom to take care of her completely, especially if she is ill. Remember, a little dog's livelyhood is at stake here as well. If it is a pup, it needs positive and good training now to make it a well adjusted adult.

raingirl
May 4th, 2005, 10:33 AM
I think if your mom says she can't take care of a dog, I would be careful. Why not get a senior dog from a rescue that is laid back and doesn't pull and just sleeps a lot? Just an idea, as it sounds like you are getting a puppy which I don't think would be the best idea.

You can go do petfinder.org and look at all the dogs that need homes in your area and I'm sure one will be gentle and fully house trained and might be a better idea.

the other option is to find someone in her area who has a dog who could come visit maybe? Like a therapy dog (they usually go into hospitals and such, but I'm sure they can make home visits).

Just a couple of ideas.

Copper'sMom
May 4th, 2005, 10:35 AM
Excellent ideas Raingirl! :thumbs up

mrtwo
May 4th, 2005, 10:46 AM
Thanks for the ideas. These are the sort of suggestions and comments I was hoping for.

I like the idea of her having her own dog because she is home all day which is something that she's not used to. My brother has promised to help out with the puppy and get her trained. I think this might be a good exercise for my brother as well.

As far as care for the puppy goes, it couldn't go to a more loving home. I couldn't count the number of stray or lost dogs that I have pulled over to help and my mom is the same way. If there's one thing that I know my mom loves in life it's animals. I always send her pics of dogs via email and she loves that. She always comments on how my cat is not as friendly or fun as a dog.

I'll take a look at the Petfinder link because even my mom said that if she were to ever get a dog again she would want it from the Humane Society. But getting her a dog that has to be really walked is not the best idea.

:ca:

nymph
May 4th, 2005, 10:50 AM
I'm really sorry to hear about your mom's illness, and am very touched by the way you care for your mom.

I did a quick search on Dystonia, it looks like this disease could cause some impairments like difficulty to move the arms, legs and loss of strength. I'm not sure what the regulations are, but could you not apply a guide dog for your mom? I've seen on TV that guide dogs are used to help people with disability not limited only to vision.

Writing4Fun
May 4th, 2005, 11:05 AM
IMHO, getting a mature dog from a shelter or breed-specific rescue would be ideal for your mother. I agree that the love of a pet can be theraputic, and would probably go a long way in helping your mom deal with her illness.

There are a lot of small-breed dogs on petfinder.com.

Here is the link to a Maltese/Bichon rescue (I don't know anything about them, but it's a place to start): http://www.happytailsrescue.ca/

Or the American Maltese Association might be able to help you find a rescue: http://www.americanmaltese.org/

Nymph, that therapy dog idea is an excellent one! I hope you consider it, Mrtwo.

Good luck in your search, and I hope your mom gains a lifetime of love from her new companion. :D

savannah
May 4th, 2005, 11:19 AM
"these little guys do not need to be walked" :confused:

Do you plan on litter training her? I have never met a dog that does not need to go outside to relieve him/herself. I have a toy dog, and although she does not NEED a daily walk, she really enjoys them, but we have a big fenced back yard which she uses quite often during the day.

mafiaprincess
May 4th, 2005, 11:28 AM
Potty training is a long messy process, even with a smaller dog. I could see someone who is ill not being up to it.. heck, I don't think I'm up to potty training a pup after this one.

A senior dog seems like a better idea.

mrtwo
May 4th, 2005, 11:30 AM
Nymph, that is a great idea. I will definitely look into that.

Writing4fun, thanks for the links. It looks like I will be busy tonight!

Savannah, I meant moreso that they don't have to be taken for long walks. My parents have a backyard that is properly fenced in. But the breeder did tell me that they don't need walks, because they are so little, and that some people train them to go on special mats.

nymph
May 4th, 2005, 11:36 AM
"National Service Dogs (NSD) (http://www.nsd.on.ca/apply.htm) is a non-profit Registered Charity specializing in breeding, training and placing Labrador and Golden Retrievers with children who have autism. NSD also provides service dogs for individuals with physical and visual challenges.

SarahLynn123
May 4th, 2005, 11:37 AM
I would definatly go for the older rescue dogs. I have 2 and I
have never regreted my decisions. Also older dogs enjoy their naps so your mother wont have to go go go with a puppy, and chewing stage is over!!! I baby sat a puppy and it got stressfull after a while. To me its like having a toddler running around (not that I dont like toddlers, just not ready yet!)

Older rescue dogs know you saved their life and remind you everyday how much they appreciate what you've done.

Good luck with your search!!!!!

mafiaprincess
May 4th, 2005, 11:40 AM
"Special mats' would be potty pads. So yeah, that is still a form of litterbox training, and it still can take dogs around 6 months to be reliably trained. That's still roughly 4 months of messes to be cleaned up, and 4 months to catch the dog when having an accident and picking it up and teaching where the right place is.

It's not the easiest thing to do..

heeler's rock!
May 4th, 2005, 11:41 AM
Mrtwo, it is great to see you wanting to help bring your mom a little joy in her life. :)

I have to disagree with some of the posts though about senior dogs. She said she can't bear the pain of losing another pet, so a senior dog would be quite hard on her as it won't have much time left. Also, a puppy might encourage her to have to pay more attention to him/her. She'll have to get up to take the dog out, it'll be rambunctious and playful, and puppies can be quite needy which would force her to have to look after it. Also, if someone else is living at home with her, they'll be able to help her care for the puppy. As for potty training, small dogs can be quite easy to potty train, and they can learn to use a litter box. If you feel a puppy may be too much, look into a bit of an older dog, maybe about a year, but not too much older as it'll be hard for your mom to let go again.

Again, this is a great thing you are doing for your mom, and I wish you the best of luck on your search for a companion for her! :o

LavenderRott
May 4th, 2005, 11:42 AM
Reading your original post, the one thing that was a MAJOR red flag for me was that the breeder was willing to take the dog back FOR A FEE.

I wouldn't buy a roll of toilet paper from this breeder. He/she is obviously breeding simply for the money and buying a dog from such a person could leave you with years of heartache from a dog with major health issues. People who breed for money do not worry about the health issues of the dogs they are breeding.

I can understand your not wanting to get an older dog, but in the world of the shelters, anything over a year old can be considered old. You can probably find a lovely dog that is two or three years old with a temperment that would suit your mother well. Don't discount a dog that would love a walk or two a day. If your mother is depressed, then spending some time out in this lovely spring weather with the flowers blooming can't help but make her feel a bit better.

nymph
May 4th, 2005, 11:50 AM
mrtwo: Here is another one, Lions Foundation of Canada (http://www.dogguides.com/programs/programs02_how.htm) seems to be the leading non-profit organization in providing specially-skilled dogs to the physically disabled people. However your mom would have to be "legally physically disabled", from what you described, it sounds like your mom is still in the early stage of the illness.

Writing4Fun
May 4th, 2005, 11:52 AM
I have to disagree with some of the posts though about senior dogs. She said she can't bear the pain of losing another pet, so a senior dog would be quite hard on her as it won't have much time left.
I quite agree! Should have clarified - when I said "mature", I meant a couple of years old, out of the puppy stages. I didn't mean "senior" as losing another dog so soon would traumatize your mom even further.

LavRott, I saw that bit about taking the pup back "for a fee" too, but didn't comment because I'm hoping Mrtow'll go the rescue route instead. But, yeah, you're right - a reputable breeder will be willing to take their pup back for free even if it's 5 years down the road. Good catch, LavRott! :)

savannah
May 4th, 2005, 12:03 PM
when i said litter box training, i was not being sarcastic. My dog was once litter box trained until she received all of her vaccines. Then she only used the makeshift litter box (a cat litter box with the front end cut off as she could not 'jump' inside, and filled with crumpled/torn up newspaper) for emergencies. But once she got a taste of going "outside" she was really turned off of the litter box.
Purina has a website on litter training dogs.
www.doglitter.com
Cant say i recommend their products, as i have never used them, and i question the toxicity of the pellets, but the site looks like it has quite a bit of information on litter training a dog (if you are interested).

SarahLynn123
May 4th, 2005, 12:06 PM
I agree with you as well Heelers. A couple years old, not seniors! I should have specified especially since I have seniors.
Thanks for catching that!!
Sarah

heeler's rock!
May 4th, 2005, 12:10 PM
I do agree with mature dogs aswell. It could be beneficial with a puppy, or a mature dog, depending how Mrtwo's mom takes to the dog.

Definitely get a rescue as these dogs need loving homes so badly. Also, a 2 or 3 year old toy breed can live as long as a cat if taken good care of! That's a good 11-15 years of companionship, and she gets to skip the training parts! :)

Whatever you decide, I really hope everything works out. :o

kandy
May 4th, 2005, 12:56 PM
I also agree that an adult dog might be better than a pup - I have a new pup right now and she is running me ragged! :o I also agree that what you are trying to do is a good thing - having an animal to talk to, to love and to take care of definitely raises the spirits. I would also be wary of a breeder that charges you to return a dog - our breeder made us sign a contract that says if we ever wanted to get rid of Hazel for any reason, she gets the first opportunity. Any good breeder knows that when you breed, you are responsible for the offspring as long as they live - whether you have possession of them or not. Good Luck and I hope that your mother has a long and happy life.

pupyluv668
May 4th, 2005, 01:32 PM
"National Service Dogs (NSD) (http://www.nsd.on.ca/apply.htm) is a non-profit Registered Charity specializing in breeding, training and placing Labrador and Golden Retrievers with children who have autism. NSD also provides service dogs for individuals with physical and visual challenges.


i agree with nymph...a special dog is good also coz they're trained to take care of sick people or people with special disabilities....oh well...putting in my 2 cents worth..lol

mrtwo
May 4th, 2005, 02:31 PM
Wow, I gotta say that I sincerely appreciate the response from everybody! Your posts have been truly helpful and have added some options for me to consider.

Heeler hit the nail on the head regarding the one downside to getting a mature dog. My mom couldn't deal with that again.

I took her out to lunch and it's visible that she is quite upset about her illness and inability to be active. I asked her what she is doing today and she told me that she is just resting. The only time she goes out during the week is to get groceries or to go to the doctor. It's really saddening to see her like this.

In regards to her illness, she has a handicap parking permit but I'm not sure what that really means. She still tells me that she doesn't want another dog right now but I think I am going to have to go against her wishes and do what I think is best for her. Not sure if that makes sense.

I will review those links that everyone sent me tonight. Thanks so much again. :grouphug:

mrtwo
May 4th, 2005, 02:33 PM
One more thing about the breeder of the Maltese charging me a fee to return the dog. She initially told me that she doesn't take puppies back anymore because in Feb somebody returned a puppy only to have it go on an IV and cost $1,300 worth of vet bills.

So I told her that she can keep $100 if I have to return it and I will even sign a paper saying that if for some reason it incurs vet bills that exceed that I will cover it.

She seems like a nice lady who really cares for the pets and is a member of the CKC. Thanks for looking out for me though!

SnowDancer
May 4th, 2005, 02:53 PM
I agree that an older dog would probably be best for your mother. My one year old Eskimo has really put me through my paces a lot this past year. Have you thought about a Greyhound, even though it is a larger breed of a dog than the Maltese? I mention this only because my vet has placed a number of Greyhounds with people who were not able to be as active as they would like - the Greyhounds were happy to walk or not. Also the grooming is not nearly the issue it would be with a Maltese.

Shamrock
May 4th, 2005, 03:28 PM
I would like to wish you good luck with this. I commend you for your caring in helping your mom feel better. As she sounds like she has been a lifelong pet lover, this is a wonderful idea worth pursuing.

Agree with the others... that a young adult rather than a senior dog would seem the best fit- a dog of about one or two.
A puppy's many requirements might indeed be a good thng in bringing her out...have her focus on the dogs needs, very therapeutic. It's difficult to know. If your brother is committed to helping out with this, that doesnt put it all onto her.. which really is a lot. If the dog does proves to be too much for her, though and is returned...would this make her feel more depressed?

I think Nymph's idea is a wonderful one! Handicapped stickers are apparently not that easy to get -.have to be approved for the disability that you are requiring this for.
However, I dont know how this pertains to obtaining a dog for such purposes. I hope this would be feasible... it would be ideal, I think.

Best wishes to you again... and for your mom. A most special Mother's Day gift you are offering her :love: - a loving animal companion to share her life with, and hopefully bring her much happiness.
I sincerely hope that it proves to be a wonderful success.

Prin
May 4th, 2005, 03:46 PM
Here's my two cents... Why don't YOU get a dog and bring it for frequent visits to your mom's and see how it goes? If she falls in love with the doggy, he may spend more and more and more time there until he's living there. If you get her a dog, she may protest, but this way, she'll treat it as a grandkid and won't be overburdened with the idea of what comes with a puppy...

I also agree with getting a mature dog too. There's an old guy at our park whose son gave him a lab puppy and he is having SOOOO much trouble. He simply doesn't have the patience, nor the strength to keep up with the training.

Mature dogs also do realize, as some people said, that you are giving them a second (or third or fourth) chance at life and are so loyal and devoted.

Good luck with your search. :) It's really kind of you to look out for your mom so much. :love:

mrtwo
May 4th, 2005, 04:27 PM
Based on everyone's feedback I think I may have to give this more time if I am not 100% sure of what to do. I plan on calling my vet tomorrow (she spayed my Lab and was also the one to put her down 10 years later) and ask her advice regarding a younger dog versus mature and also a big dog versus a small dog.

The reason why I can't get a dog is because my apartment won't allow it, my lifestyle doesn't allow it, plus, I really don't think that I can deal with the death of another guy as well. :(

The difference for me and my mom is that she still has to live in the house where we had our Lab. So the house must feel really empty to her now. I like the arguments for both mature dogs and puppies but also need to think about a big dog versus small.

The insight in this post is extremely valuable. As for a special needs dog I think that is a fantastic idea but don't know if she qualifies. I will probably call the Lion's Club and see what they day regarding her illness.

Thanks so much for the support. :thumbs up

chico2
May 4th, 2005, 05:14 PM
mrtwo,I just wanted to commend you for caring so much about your moms wellbeing.
I know if I ever had to live without my animals,or the ability to do what I want,gardening,painting etc...I would be hardpressed to find a reason to get up in the morning :sad:
I hope your mom will realize the benefits of being loved by and love a dog and having such a wonderful son/daughter caring about her :love:

Dahlia
May 4th, 2005, 06:30 PM
I think a maltese is an excellent choice. My grandma is disabled and she has one. He is the sweetest little thing, just runs outside to do his business and wants right back in. She doesn't have to go out with him or chase him down or anything. *BUT* he was already full grown and housetrained when he was rescued and given to her. She would not have been able to housetrain a small puppy herself. I'm 26 and just housetrained my beagle, and it IS a lot of work. You have to be constantly on the lookout and ready to grab the pup and get it outside - even if you don't feel like getting up. Just a thought. Maybe you could find a rescue one that's a year or two old like some of the other posters said. I do love that you are thinking of your mom. But I think she would appreciate the doggy more if it was already trained and ready to just be a companion.

mona_b
May 4th, 2005, 06:54 PM
One more thing about the breeder of the Maltese charging me a fee to return the dog. She initially told me that she doesn't take puppies back anymore because in Feb somebody returned a puppy only to have it go on an IV and cost $1,300 worth of vet bills.

Just have to say this.No reputable breeder would ever charge a fee to return a pup.Also,the $1.300 of vet bills was probably because of poor breeding.If she doesn't show or have titled dogs,then I definately would not get a pup from her.That's just my 2 cents.

Now to your Mother.I am so very sorry to hear what she is going through.I definately agree with the others.I would actually go to a rescue.Or contact the people from the links that were posted for you.And I know you have mentioned that your brother would help with the training,but I would definately go for an adult dog.It could even be one that is a year or 2.Service dogs for the disabled actually come from shelters and pounds.They get adopted out from these organizations,and trained.

What ever you decide,I wish you all the best.

mrtwo
May 4th, 2005, 09:29 PM
Thanks again everyone. I spoke to my brother and talked about all options and we have think that the puppy route is the way we will go. My brother has promised to help out as much as possible with the pup. I think the arguement for an adult dog is a great idea as well but the strangest thing happened..........my mom called me this evening and told me that she doesn't want a dog. She said that my brother and I were asking her about dogs which hinted her off. Well, after a conversation I have gotten her to agree to getting the dog. She will be going to the breeder with me this Friday morning to pick a pup.

Her main concern is going through the heartbreak of when it comes time to part with the dog. But she doesn't have many hobbies and my mom lights up even when I bring my cat over which she "says" she isn't overly fond of (my cat really doesn't care for anyone but myself).

So I'm pretty with how things turned out. I did search those links that were provided but couldn't find a young Maltese that would be suitable. I'm just really excited for my mom and can't wait to see her happy again.

Thanks again everyone! :grouphug:

Writing4Fun
May 4th, 2005, 09:53 PM
Hey Mrtwo. It's great to hear that your mom is opening up to the idea! :thumbs up

Can I suggest, though, that you research other breeders? In all honesty, I think Mona's comments were bang-on. First off, any good breeder will take back their puppies for any reason and after any length of time. I also suspect that Mona's right about the reasons why this pup needed that kind of medical attention. Really, your best bet would be to find the local Maltese club and ask them for some referrals. Get a list, interview them all. Ask to see the pedigrees of their pups. It may not seem important to you to have parents who were champions, but no reputable breeder would breed anything but champions. So if someone is breeding untitled dogs, then I'd suspect a back-yard-breeder or miller. This type of breeder will not do the extensive health testing required, and you will end up with a sick pup. In your mother's case, you should be extra vigilant about bringing home a pup with potential health issues. The breeder should have just as many questions for you as you have for them, and they will spend as much time with you, your brother and your mother as is needed to ensure a perfect match. They'll breed one or two litters/year max - not have five different litters available at any given time. The puppy must be sold on a spay/neuter contract. Gee, is there anything I'm forgetting here folks? :D I guess the final word is - this is a lifetime commitment, so it should take more than a few days to find the right breeder and the right puppy. Good luck in your search! :)

Lizzie
May 5th, 2005, 08:26 AM
I was thinking the same thing Writing4Fun. Just because this dog is CKC does NOT mean that this is a reputable breeder. The worst thing that could happen to this poor woman is to take home a sickly pup. Wouldn't that just set her back into her depression (if that's what it is)?

mrtwo
May 5th, 2005, 09:26 AM
Interesting comments.

This breeder is located in Oshawa and had an ad in the Toronto Star. According to the lady she has been doing this for decades.

She used to take puppies back until Feb when somebody took a puppy and introduced it to a home with other dogs. Apparently, when they returned the dog it had contacted illness. So she doesn't want to get stuck with another big vet bill.

She said she only has two puppies left and the next litter is due late this month. I believe there are three females and one male stud that produce the litters.

She still has the 72 hour vet visit that she honours and apparently she wants to take the time to show us all the grooming, crate and products that she recommends (she does not sell any product though). I think she said she has a 1 year health guarantee as well.

It's $900 for males, $1K for females without a pedigree. It's another $500 for the pedigree which I am not interested in.

More thoughts?

happycats
May 5th, 2005, 09:31 AM
WOW that's alot of money!(and reputable breeders do not sell pups in the paper!) I know the Toronto Humane Society has a Maltese, that's fixed and UTD on shots, and they only charge $50.00.

Writing4Fun
May 5th, 2005, 12:10 PM
Comments? Just a few... ;)

This breeder is located in Oshawa and had an ad in the Toronto Star. According to the lady she has been doing this for decades.
Agree with Happycats - reputable breeders don't advertise in the newspaper. Length of time in business doesn't mean anything. I know a very popular and well-known car dealership who has been in business for decades, but I would never buy a car from them if they were the last dealership on earth. I'd rather walk. ;)

She used to take puppies back until Feb when somebody took a puppy and introduced it to a home with other dogs. Apparently, when they returned the dog it had contacted illness. So she doesn't want to get stuck with another big vet bill.
A reputable breeder wouldn't care, and would continue taking their pups back. Their pups are like their children, and they understand that, when they breed these puppies, they are responsible for them for life. If she gave that pup to an unworthy home that wound up getting the pup sick, then she didn't do her job as a breeder in finding the right home for her pup. More likely, though, is that the pup was sick before the new owners brought it home and the pup wound up infecting the resident dogs. :(

She said she only has two puppies left and the next litter is due late this month. I believe there are three females and one male stud that produce the litters.
Having just had a litter with leftover pups (a reputable breeder won't have pups leftover - they have waiting lists and all pups are spoken for before they are born) and having another litter coming along so soon - this doesn't sound right, especially with only 3 females. That's a lot of consecutive breeding for the poor girls.

She still has the 72 hour vet visit that she honours and apparently she wants to take the time to show us all the grooming, crate and products that she recommends (she does not sell any product though). I think she said she has a 1 year health guarantee as well.
Again, a reputable breeder will take pups back after more than 72 hours. I'm not sure about this, but I believe most will have a longer guarantee against genetic defects, since they're trying to breed to eliminate them.

It's $900 for males, $1K for females without a pedigree. It's another $500 for the pedigree which I am not interested in.
:eek: That is a rediculous amount of money for a pup without papers!! Is a non-breeding contract included, or does she not care whether or not you get your pup spayed/neutered? Quite frankly, I'm suspecting another BYB/miller. You could go to a reputable breeder and get a pet-quality pup, it will be registered and have a health guarantee, and you will have the peace of mind knowing that all the necessary care has gone into it's breeding. I would not buy a puppy from this woman, based on all you have said here.

After all you've told us about this "breeder", I'm even more convinced that you should not buy a puppy from her. I'm very concerned that you will wind up with a sick pup and your mother will have to deal with the suffering, or the pup could die prematurely. Please, please reconsider an older rescue (there are a ton of small-breed dogs in the 2yr range on Petfinder - just search for "young" & "small"). At the very least, if your heart is set on a puppy, please research many other breeders very carefully.

Good luck.

Lizzie
May 5th, 2005, 12:26 PM
I agree that based on what you've said about the "breeder" that she is not the place for you to buy your new puppy. The first indication of a non-reputable breeder tends to be the simple act of placing an ad in the newspaper.

I understand that you would like a puppy--so, perhaps you should contact the local breed association. From a quick search online I found information on three breeders who seem to be worth a call--if you want a healthy, strong toy dog.

You must remember that Maltese dogs are very fragile and small. If you do not buy one from a very reputable place you are going to end up with problems....problems that may not help your mother.


Bourque Carole, Charmglow Reg'd. Happy, healthy, home-raised puppies from champion bloodlines. Breeder of multi Best in Show, Best Puppy in Show, Canadian and American champions including No 1 Maltese two years running, No 1 Toy 1990 and No 5 Maltese 2002. Puppies available occasionally to approved, loving homes only. Inquiries welcome. 19193 Kennedy Rd, RR 1, Caledon, ON L0N 1C0. (519-927-5680).

Dufour Kathryn. From champion bloodlines. Pet and show quality. 284 Alex Doner Dr, Newmarket, ON L3X 1G6. (905-853-6178; cell 717-8165; e-mail: kathys.maltese@rogers.com).

Evans Faith & Jack, Faithful's Reg'd. Since 1972. Breeder of the top point-winning Maltese (for a single year) in Canadian history. 1051 Stainton Dr, Mississauga, ON L5C 1G3. (905-279-6654).

goldenblaze
May 5th, 2005, 12:33 PM
I agree, please be careful when buying a pup. You don't want to have a poor pup from a breeder that is in it only for the money not the health of the pups. Been there done that and wish it on no one, look around and you will find the perfect dog please stay away from breeders that sell their pups in the newspaer or a puppy mill pet stores too. Good luck, hope your Mom really enjoys her new baby.

mrtwo
May 5th, 2005, 01:37 PM
Okay, guys, since the argument is strong here I think what I want to do is wait this one out and find a small dog, about a year old, that we can adopt from a shelter. Or find another breeder.

I'm just terribly afraid of a dog with health issues or with behavioural problems.

I will also call the other breeders that was kind enough to be posted.

Once again, thank you.

mrtwo
May 5th, 2005, 02:28 PM
Other than the three breeders mentioned above, I can't seem to locate anymore. I never thought that newspaper ads for puppies was really wrong.

Are there specific questions that I should be asking the breeder?

Also, I think I already know the answer to this but should I never consider buying a pet from a pet store? I was thinking specifically of Doogans in Markville Mall.

I apprecite your feedback.

goldenblaze
May 5th, 2005, 02:37 PM
Good for you great way to go :thumbs up Now for the pet store stay away from stores that sell pups for large amount of money with no health background or information about where this pup came from..Puppy mill sell their pups to stores. :sad:

Many place though have dogs for adoption through the HS or shelters, they have the dogs or cats in the store so they can be seen. I know Pet Smart in Ottawa does this, not sure where you are but try looking into that good luck and have fun. :)

Writing4Fun
May 5th, 2005, 02:52 PM
Excellent! :thumbs up

Here's a link to "No Puppy Mills Canada" and their recommended list of questions when interviewing a reputable breeder: http://www.nopuppymillscanada.ca/reputable_breeders.htm

You can get a list of breeders from the CKC, or their publication "Dogs In Canada" (www.dogsincanada.com). Be warned, though, that just because a breeder is CKC registered, it does not mean they are a good breeder. You'll still want to ask all your questions, visit the kennel, review bloodlines, and so on...

LavenderRott
May 5th, 2005, 03:12 PM
Other than the three breeders mentioned above, I can't seem to locate anymore. I never thought that newspaper ads for puppies was really wrong.

Are there specific questions that I should be asking the breeder?

Also, I think I already know the answer to this but should I never consider buying a pet from a pet store? I was thinking specifically of Doogans in Markville Mall.

I apprecite your feedback.


Do some research online and find out about the standard and any genetic faults that run in your breed. I believe that among other things, small dogs are prone to slipped stiffles (but I can't think of the technical term for them) and a couple of other diseases are not uncommon. Who ever you buy from should have their dogs tested for these diseases and should not be breeding dogs that show signs of them. Or haven't been tested clear. Genetic issues aren't generally something that your regular vet will check for (unless specifically asked) and some things require a specialist to diagnose.

The right breeder will have so many more questions to ask you then you can think of asking them that you will start to think that you are adopting a human child. But, most of the breeders that I know and trust can tell you where 99% of their pups have gone, what they have done in the show ring - both conformation and obedience, what temperment titles they have and they can find that puppy's family's phone number - even if the pup was born 10 years ago! They breed to improve the breed, not make money and they really care that you get a healthy pup that you can get along with.

kandy
May 5th, 2005, 05:55 PM
When my husband and I decided on a newf, I had to search and search and search before I found a breeder that was fairly close (5 1/2 hr drive). When I inquired about buying a pup she started asking questions about where the dog would be during the day, how long my and my husband's work day was, if we had a fenced backyard, what we planned to do with the dog, if we had any experience with big dogs, etc, etc......I felt like I was being interrogated by the FBI!! :D When we called the breeder to tell her about Lacey (PTS at 18 months due to birth defect - kidney failure) she had all of her breeding stock tested for any signs of kidney problems and gave us a free pup (which we just got). This breeder has waiting lists for her dogs - it took us over 6 months to get Lacey - and 4 months to get Hazel.

mona_b
May 7th, 2005, 10:51 AM
Interesting comments.

This breeder is located in Oshawa and had an ad in the Toronto Star. According to the lady she has been doing this for decades.

She used to take puppies back until Feb when somebody took a puppy and introduced it to a home with other dogs. Apparently, when they returned the dog it had contacted illness. So she doesn't want to get stuck with another big vet bill.

She said she only has two puppies left and the next litter is due late this month. I believe there are three females and one male stud that produce the litters.

She still has the 72 hour vet visit that she honours and apparently she wants to take the time to show us all the grooming, crate and products that she recommends (she does not sell any product though). I think she said she has a 1 year health guarantee as well.

It's $900 for males, $1K for females without a pedigree. It's another $500 for the pedigree which I am not interested in.

More thoughts?

Here is my thought on this.(Come on guys,you know I'm going to comment on this..... :D :p )

She is what we call a Backyard Breeder.Reputable breeders NERVER EVER use the newspaper to sell their pups.And her charging two different prices for with or without the pedigree is a very big no no.Now my question(sorry but brain is not working)Is it the Pedigree papers or the CKC registration papers?Cause if it's the CKC papers,what she is doing is ilegal.You can not charge one price for a pup with pares,then turn around and charge another without.
Also,a reputable breeder has what is called a waiting list.This means you are put on a waiting list BEFORE breeding takes place.Some breeders will have pups,but that's only because someone has backed out,or someone has returned a pup for one reason or another.I was put on one for my dogs.

Does she show or have titled dogs?Are they health or genetic tested?

Also,NEVER EVER get one from a pet store.

Where are you located?Maybe I can steer you in the right direction. :)

glasslass
May 7th, 2005, 12:17 PM
Mrtwo, I've been there, done that, so maybe I can offer a few thoughts. After my pop died, my mom's dog died a year later and she was devastated. She also was depressed, starting having anxiety attacks, and spoke of loneliness at night. She talked about missing her dog, but also said she didn't feel she could afford to care for one properly and at 77yrs didn't want to worry about becoming ill or being unable to care for one. I took her to see some puppies and told her not to feel pressured. I reminded her that we plan on consolidating households anyway (this is going to be a new thread) and that a pup would be a member of our family too and as such, we would be responsible for it's care and needs too. No worries about it ever needing a home! Of course, "Corky" climbed into her lap and she fell in love. I paid for him and I pay for all his vet bills, food, and any other needs. When mom goes anywhere, Corky stays with us and is perfectly happy. I do all his grooming. He's healthy, but it hasn't been inexpensive. When he was almost a year old, he jumped from my mom's lap onto the kitchen floor and broke his leg, costing $900. I don't regret taking on this responsibility. We love Corky! Corky and Den-Den are buddies. Because they are both neutered males and Corky is much smaller than Den-Den, there are no dominance issues. He's easy for her to pick up and carry. She feels needed again and constantly is calling to tell us his latest antic.

The points here that I'm trying to make:
1. Let your mom make the final decision and let her choose her own dog.
2. Respect her decision. Feeling she doesn't have control will not help her depression.
3. If she's worried about her ability to care for one, be able and willing to be responsible for it. She doesn't need to be stressed out worrying about what will happen if her condition worsens. Be aware that healthy dogs will have expensive vet bills too.
4. Be aware there are medications for depression which can make a world of difference. It's not just a mental condition but can also be a physical one. Medications can correct chemical imbalances that can cause depression. Maybe when she feels more "up", she'll be more responsive to getting a dog.

"The reason why I can't get a dog is because my apartment won't allow it, my lifestyle doesn't allow it, plus, I really don't think that I can deal with the death of another guy as well."

Is your brother able and willing to be responsible for one?

Curious about your "name". Do you drive a MR2?

glasslass
May 7th, 2005, 12:28 PM
Just want to add, we made big mistakes too! I thought I was being so careful. I inspected the breeder, a nice family with two females, one male. I saw both the mother and father dogs. Everything was clean. She gave me the vaccination records, etc. etc. Since then, I found this board and I now know Corky came from a backyard breeder. We were lucky. Corky had no health issues. The breeder gave us a health guarantee to take him back if our vet check-up turned up any problems. But seriously, if there had been, we could never have taken him back and abandoned him.

mrtwo
May 9th, 2005, 02:45 PM
I called a few other breeders of Malteses and did not hear good things about the one I was considering.

To make a long story short I ended up getting a "Bi-Poo" from a local breeder. Half Bichon half Poodle. My mom's loving her so far but complains about all the work (but my mom is like that). My brother is helping out a lot and I'm taking her to the vet tomorrow night.

Here's a pic of "Maggie" http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y216/chenner/DSCN1059Small.jpg

p.s. Yes, I had an MR2 turbo from '92-'99

Thanks to everybody for their help again. It made a difference!

Shamrock
May 9th, 2005, 03:58 PM
Best of luck with the new puppy- she is just a sweetie!. :angel:
I hope things will all go very well for everyone, and that Maggie's care and sweet love will provide a real help to your mom feeling better.
Let us know how things are proceeding, wont you?

chico2
May 9th, 2005, 04:26 PM
Awwww,what a little darling,I think you made the right choice and your mom will soon be feeling better.
Having been taking care of kids,husband and animals all my life,I could not imagine having noone to care for,I sooo understand your mom,I would be very depressed and lonely.But this little sunshine I am sure will make all the difference :thumbs up

Blaze01
May 9th, 2005, 04:31 PM
That is the cutest little thing! Good luck and I hope your mom gets to feeling better!

rijahsister
March 27th, 2006, 12:54 PM
The reason I am writing is that my brother has been diagnosed w/ Dystonia and is now depressed from the emotional rollercoaster. I wanted to see how your mom's dystonia was doing and if having Maggie has helped her get through the depression as I am considering getting a dog for my brother as well. We've grown up w/ dogs since we were 5 and before being diagnosed w/ dystonia he's been wanting a dog of his own (he absolutely adores my dog, a miniature schnauzer). I wanted to see if having Maggie has given your mom new meaning/new purpose, which is the problem my brother is facing today. I'd love to hear how your mom is doing and Maggie too!

Kerrye
March 27th, 2006, 03:08 PM
Hi
I agree with getting an older dog from a rescue. I found my dog through petfinder.com. He is approx 3-4yrs old and is a perfect angel. He was housebroken and well trained. Try looking at petfinder.com - those dogs really need homes.

Writing4Fun
March 27th, 2006, 03:17 PM
Rijahsister, the original poster hasn't been here since November of 2005. I don't think you'll be getting a reply to your questions. Sorry! :(

theplainsjane
March 27th, 2006, 07:54 PM
I hadn't seen this thread the first time around, but the bit about a returned puppy costing her $1300 so she wasn't taking anymore back really made me angry!

I am a small rescue in rural Virginia. I sometimes adopt out the dogs I rescue, but I often pull dogs to safety who are going to other rescues, as well. There are just too many here--I can not foster and adopt all of them out, so I send them off to screened and approved rescue groups, sometimes even out of state.

I just pulled a dog who went off to Golden Retriever rescue and when I dropped her off, it was with the understanding that she ALWAYS had a place with me. She is heartworm positive (and my local Golden Rescue is wonderful), but I've still been in close touch with her new foster mom to make SURE that the dog receives proper treatment, which I'm sure that she will. If for any reason I found out she wasn't, I would get her back and pay for the treatment myself. And it wouldn't keep me from doing the same for ANY OTHER DOG I RESCUE. Every dog that I foster, adopt out, or transfer to another rescue group is mine FOREVER and I am ultimately responsible for it for the rest of its life. And I sure as heck am not getting five and six hundred dollars a piece for them. I know that MRTWO wasn't the one who made the comment, that the breeder was---and it just got my hackles up, so I had to vent!