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Bestdog breed for two little boys???

anniebananie
May 3rd, 2005, 06:38 AM
My two grandsons, aged 4 and 2 1/2, and their parents are looking for a puppy. What dominent breed should they be looking for in a mixed breed or what breed would be good for two active little boys. My daughter would walk the dog every day, and the puppy would have a HUGE fenced yard to play in with the boys. They are looking for a middle sized dog who would be active with the boys, but be easy to train and quieter for the parents. They are also looking for one that has a long life span - which some breeds don't have. They boys are great with my to JR's, but the JR's are getting older and don't have the patience of a younger dog. Plus JR's are inclined to dig holes, and my daughter doesn't want to encourage the boys to copy/help the dog. :rolleyes: She is a gardener, or trying to be one.

:ca:

coppperbelle
May 3rd, 2005, 07:43 AM
My two grandsons, aged 4 and 2 1/2, and their parents are looking for a puppy. What dominent breed should they be looking for in a mixed breed or what breed would be good for two active little boys. My daughter would walk the dog every day, and the puppy would have a HUGE fenced yard to play in with the boys. They are looking for a middle sized dog who would be active with the boys, but be easy to train and quieter for the parents. They are also looking for one that has a long life span - which some breeds don't have. They boys are great with my to JR's, but the JR's are getting older and don't have the patience of a younger dog. Plus JR's are inclined to dig holes, and my daughter doesn't want to encourage the boys to copy/help the dog. :rolleyes: She is a gardener, or trying to be one.

:ca:
I am a little concerned at the expectations you have for a puppy. Most breeds while puppies will require more than a walk a day. Allowing him to play in a backyard is not a sufficient amount of exercise. The kids will soon grow tired of playing with him and he will be out there on his own, "digging".
Easy to train! Long life span! Quiet with the parents! I think before your daughter decides to get a dog she should do some research. Dogs (puppies) are a lot of work especially when they are young. They shed, dig holes, , wake you up in the middle of the night, need exercise, require training, more exercise, a good quality food, trips to the vet and an added expense. But of course you know this. Do you think your daughter and her family are ready for a pup? Perhaps an older dog that has passed the puppy stage would be a better idea.

anniebananie
May 3rd, 2005, 07:54 AM
She has grown up with animals all her life and knows how to care for a dog. She is around all day as she's a stay at home mother. I was (in a previous life) and Vetinary nurse. She also knows she will have another *baby* in her family and is ready for that. What I am trying to work out is what in a mixed breed should be the dominant breed. A collie would be too hyper for two small boys - although I grew up with one that was wonderful. She also knows not to buy at pet shops and when she does buy, ask to see the parents if possible - and not take the boys with them when they go to see puppies. Our family have always had lots of animals around, and I was a registered breeder of King Charles Cavaliers in the UK. Both parents of the boys want a dog and are willing to put time and effort into raising one - but they just want to get the right one. I don't think the boys will grow tired of having one - and it will give them a wonderful experience to carry through life. To my daughter it would be like having another baby - and she knows this.

LavenderRott
May 3rd, 2005, 08:08 AM
There really is no single best breed. All of the qualities you are looking for can be found in most breeds - depending on the temperment of the individual dog. While labs are often touted as the best breeds for a family such as you describe, without training they can be as uncontrollable and nasty tempered as pit bulls are reported to be. Pit Bulls can be wonderful family pets and excellent with children if properly raised and trained.

Since your daughter has certain things that she is looking for sizewise and temperment wise, I would suggest she skip the puppy stage and look for a slightly older dog to rescue from either a shelter or a rescue group.

Lizzie
May 3rd, 2005, 08:31 AM
What about a golden retriever? They tend to be easy to train, and are good with kids. Perhaps some of the people with goldens on this board could give you more advice.

Dozer's Mom
May 3rd, 2005, 08:33 AM
Since your daughter has certain things that she is looking for sizewise and temperment wise, I would suggest she skip the puppy stage and look for a slightly older dog to rescue from either a shelter or a rescue group.


I agree with you 100%. My parents made the mistake of getting a black lab puppy a couple years ago and my little brother was 5. He MAULED that poor puppy to death!!! You had to watch him ALL the time. Poor Winnie (the puppy) couldn't get away from him. Even now, 2 years later, she will not go into his room even if he tries to bribe her with treats. She pretty much just ignores him. I still have to watch him around my puppy because even though he's a little older, he still tends to be quite mauly (is that even a word...lol) with Dozer. The sad thing is though, is that once the puppy turns into a dog, he won't show near as much interest in him.

Writing4Fun
May 3rd, 2005, 08:45 AM
I agree that no one breed can guarantee what your daughter is looking for.

From my own experience, I have found that Lab/Shep/Collie mixes usually turn out to be well-rounded, adaptable dogs. I firmly believe, though, that a lot of it comes down to training and socialization.

I would suggest she take her children to a shelter and see how the different pups/dogs interact with them. When we went to an "adoption fair", we sat in the pen with the puppies and watched them interact with my son. Some were paying no attention to him whatsoever. Others were pulling at his pant legs, trying to wrestle with him. In the end, we chose our pup (partly) because she came to me readily when I called, she followed my son around nicely without attacking his every move, and in the end, when he sat on the floor, she curled up next to him and went to sleep. :D HTH!

happycats
May 3rd, 2005, 08:49 AM
What about a golden retriever? They tend to be easy to train, and are good with kids. Perhaps some of the people with goldens on this board could give you more advice.

Goldies are great family pets, but are VERY active, and most people with kids that young have problems with pups (when fully grown) knocking kids over !
I know someone in my neighborhood, who just got rid of one for just that reason! pup became fully grown and kept knocking over the 2 year old! The poor dog wasn't jumping, just running all the time, and knocking him over as he ran by!

I would also recomend an older (2 or older ) whose temperment is known, and who has had some training. JMO :o

levimh
May 3rd, 2005, 09:31 AM
I think going to a local shelter and finding a dog that's a little older, who's energy level isn't a great as that of a puppy, would be a good choice. At a shelter you can take the dog out, walk it around, and see if it's right for you.

If they are really set on a puppy, I'd would maybe recommend a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever. They're a lot like Golden Retrievers, but smaller.

Hope you find the right puppy/dog. :)

Lucky Rescue
May 3rd, 2005, 09:59 AM
What age puppy is she thinking of?

I wouldn't get a puppy younger than 7months to 1 yr. A young puppy WILL jump on and scratch and bite the kids, especially the 2 yr old, if they are all left unsupervised in the yard.

Seriously, with a 4 yr old and a 2 yr old, a little puppy is the last thing needed here (no offense intended!) Just walking and trying to train the puppy with two small boys along will be quite a feat.

Large breeds are usually calmer than small breeds. Any dog may dig holes and bark if left in a yard for any length of time.

If your sister wants a dog, the best thing is to go to a shelter, or look on Petfinder and find one that meets at least some of her requirements.

At a rescue, she may get a dog who is already living with kids.

Joey.E.CockersMommy
May 3rd, 2005, 10:22 AM
I personally like the English Cocker Spaniel according to my research they are considered fairly easy to train, are considered good with children (although one website did suggest waiting till the kids are 6) and are considered an excellent family pet. They are about 16 inches high and a bit bigger than the American Cocker Spaniels and are considered to be better with kids than the
Americans and less likely to have breeding problems as they are less common
problems. I have only seen a few of them in rescue mostly in the states.
Good luck whatever breed or mixed breed you pick out. There is a link to one of the many breed websites for ECE I like this one because it actually has vidoes of the dogs
breedinhttp://www.angelfire.com/ca7/petley/

DogueLover
May 3rd, 2005, 10:24 AM
I agree that there may not be one particular breed that matches what they are looking for, however, I personally like the larger breeds. Smaller breeds are often intimidated by small children and will resort to biting for defense. Yes this can happen with large breeds but the breeds I have had with small children ( Rottweillers, Rottweiller/shepherd, Dogue De Bordeaux) just seem to have a higher tolerance to the children.
A puppy is a lot of work, and with two young children it could become very tiresome, but it can be done. ( When we got our first Bordeaux my daughters were 2 years old and 3 months old and I managed quite well.)
Any dog can be trained to do what you would like, and as long as your daughter and her husband have the time then I don`t think anyone can say they Shouldn`t get a puppy.
As was mentioned here before, take the children to an adoption and let them play with the puppies, sometimes the puppy will pick the family instead of the other way around.
The only concern I have with a puppy and two little ones is the nipping/chewing thing that puppies are so famous for. Those little teeth are like razors and a two and 4 year old would not be able to make the puppy stop. Once you get past that, they should be fine.
The kids will need almost as much training as the puppy, just so that they know what is acceptable treatment of the puppy.

Good luck with your search,hope that special puppy finds the family.

nymph
May 3rd, 2005, 10:31 AM
What about a golden retriever? They tend to be easy to train, and are good with kids. Perhaps some of the people with goldens on this board could give you more advice.

I was going to suggest this. Golden retrievers are very gentle with kids, very easy to train and more laid back than labs.

Dahlia
May 3rd, 2005, 10:34 AM
We were raised with beagles, and they are mid sized and great with kids, but they like to dig, too. But I think most dogs will if you give them access to dirt and don't watch them closely. We have a beagle pup right now who's 4 mos old. She was quite a pain for a while, but all puppies are. She's finally starting to settle down more but she loves to chew on anything she can get her mouth on. Also, my kids are 8, 10, and 9 mos. The older kids don't really pay any attention to the dog at all. But the baby loves her and they play great together. Sophie knows not to play rough with him. We just recently got her to stop chewing on the kids, though. But again I think that's something that all puppies will do.

goldenblaze
May 3rd, 2005, 10:38 AM
Labs are very hyper yes and Golden Rertriever's can be aswell, depends on each dog. Blaze is very laid back but does get excited very easy he is gentle but he can push children over and not mean too. My friends Golden is large and hyper, he would not be great with kids so really an older dog that has been around kids I believe would be best.

Good Luck in your search :)

Eleni
May 3rd, 2005, 10:57 AM
I can speak for experience that it is something short of impossible to housetrain a puppy with little kids.


I ahve a puppy, and a 4 yr old a2 yr old and 5 month old. and the only reason we suceeded is i was darn comittied, but ill tell you it was stressful and I wouldnt do it again.

its defnatly something to strongly consider when getting a pup


Eleni

heeler's rock!
May 3rd, 2005, 11:00 AM
Any dog can be uncontrollable without training. Don't discount a particular breed just because of the breed stereotyping. I have a border collie, and she is an angel. She's not hyper or too demanding, and she's great with people, kids, dogs, cats, and rabbits! When we chose this breed, we went to people who had non-working parents, so that herding drive or instinct wasn't as great as a working dog's would be. Her parents were just regular farm dogs and produced mellow puppies.

Another great breed are Australian Cattle Dogs. They're loyal, good with kids when raised with them, my 2 crosses are great with cats and rabbits too. Only thing is, they can be assertive with other dogs and a lot of people mistake this assertiveness for agression. My oldest heeler hates it when a dog comes rushing into her space, so she snaps and growls a bit, but the other dog usually backs off and leaves or gives her the respect she's seeking. She's never been in a fight, unless she's trying to break one up that's already started. With the proper training and socialization, heelers are great dogs for families and will love their families to death. I've never met a more loyal dog than my Red, the Red Heeler.

Good luck in your search! :)

Lucky Rescue
May 3rd, 2005, 11:01 AM
I agree with Dalia. A beagle might be a very good choice!

I would not, in general, recommend Cocker Spaniels for little kids.

Beaglemom
May 3rd, 2005, 11:15 AM
I would think that an older puppy or a young adult dog of a medium to large breed would be the best choice for a family with young kids. I would stay away from toy breeds just because they can get injured accidently when playing with young children.

Puppies tend to be quite active and require alot of time to housetrain and also they will go through the teething stage which will require alot of patience and training. Also, young puppies can get hurt very easily during play with small kids. Puppies will also nip and can hurt young kids.

My beagle absolutely loves kids! She will just lick them nonstop! As a puppy though they can be a handful! Just like many puppies can. Beagles tend to be a bit more robust and can handle the rough play.

levimh
May 3rd, 2005, 11:33 AM
What about rescuing a greyhound?

kandy
May 3rd, 2005, 12:42 PM
I would not recommend a cocker spaniel - I was bitten in the face by a cocker when I was 5. Wasn't being mean to the dog, just petting it - or so my mom says. The dog just about took off both my lips. That was more than 35 years ago...but I still refuse to own a small dog because of it - and I have always been lots more afraid of small dogs than big! :p Of course, that could be the difference between the English and the American versions as I'm sure this was probably an American version. I think that sometimes small dogs try to make up for their lack of size with a big attitude! :D

I do know that my newfs have all loved kids and want to kiss them non-stop. Although Parker hasn't done it yet, Lacey knocked kids over quite regularly just by bumping into them or licking too enthusiastically! :D Good Luck in your search for the "Perfect Puppy"!

anniebananie
May 3rd, 2005, 12:51 PM
Thank you for your suggestions. Actually both boys are very gentle with dogs - but do love to play with my two when they visit. The younger one especially - he regards dogs in great awe and respect. Mine are JR's and elderly - so can be quite snippy if they put their minds to it. They have been around friends puppies and the parents wonder how they (the boys) got to be so good around the dogs. I think a mutt would be great - so will tell her your suggestions for the dominebt breed to look for. :party:

mafiaprincess
May 3rd, 2005, 12:55 PM
I have a cocker spaniel, and I wouldn't recommend it with 2 really little kids. While it could take more abuse than a toy breed, it still isn't that sturdy for rough hands.

And from all the horrible stories I've heard about cockers, I think it is another one of those dog temperment + good or bad owner dependant things.

I have had so many people tell me my dog is going to grow up to be a demon, because of bad stories or bad experience. Kind of like bsl. Enough people hear bad things, and it is all they want to hear.

Prin
May 3rd, 2005, 01:14 PM
I was going to say a newf or a lab. But newfs don't play too much when they get older and you'd probably say labs are too excitable... I don't agree with the golden retriever. It really depends where you get it. There are two at our park who had to stop coming because they were too aggressive. But I guess if you can know ahead of time if the dog is good with kids or not, it wouldn't matter. :)

People REALLY have to know that getting a dog with a good temperment is NOT a free pass to not train your dog. Dogs who are not dominant and not aggressive BECOME dominant and aggressive when they don't have a leader. Dogs can be very dangerous around kids and a mom getting a dog has to ensure that the dog is trained such that the kids are safer (not safe-- they are never safe with a dog unsupervised).

As for the longevity of a dog, you have to be prepared to feed it really good food and keep it fit and happy to get that. It's not all about being a small dog or not. My newf growing up lived till 16 and my dobie lived till 13. No dog's life is guaranteed either. Some dogs get cancer early in life. As a vet tech, I would assume you knew all that.


If collies are too excitable, I don't know if you'll ever find an appropriate dog. To find a dog that only plays when you want it to is a rather hard find. Maybe you should wait for those genetically engineered pets. :)

Lucky Rescue
May 3rd, 2005, 01:26 PM
People REALLY have to know that getting a dog with a good temperment is NOT a free pass to not train your dog.

Agree. It's also not a pass to leave it alone with little kids. MANY kids have been bitten by Labs, because people think "It's o.k - it's a Lab" and do not supervise.

As for collies ( I assume you mean Rough Collies?), I've never seen a "hyper" one.

CyberKitten
May 3rd, 2005, 01:28 PM
I think you almost have to have the dog BEFORE the children come along in some cases - it is much easier, at least it was when our fox terrier and my brother bonded when he was a baby. (He replaced her as the baby but she got over it and followed him everywhere, her protective instincts showing). That said, an older dog would bve so much better. I went through puppy stages with my poodle and beagle and did not have small children around. It was he** some nights I do not mind admitting. Puppies are a lot of work and you can never leave them alone with children. So your daughter might well have to hire a sitter to watch the dog and the children if she wants to get work done.

I think she should consider going to a rescue group and and visiting with the dogs to see how they are around toddlers. Dogs and toddlers are a frequent reason for visits to the ER - or should I say unsupervised and poorly socialized and trained toddlers and dogs together are a combination that can lead to ER visits.

That said, a fox terrier is a great dog for children or a terrier mix of some kind. Labs are also good though they are so huge that can unintentionally knock down the children. When I was a toddler, we had a Siberian Husky - beautiful dog - and he was wonderful.

lilith_rizel
May 3rd, 2005, 01:35 PM
We had a Welsh Corgi and she was pretty good around my sister Kari and she was only an infant at the time. But with children at the age where they like to grab and pet, a small dog like that might not be too good of an idea. The doggie mught get hurt.

lilith_rizel
May 3rd, 2005, 01:43 PM
What about bloodhounds? Are they good with children??? From the breed profiles here, they look like they are. Any one have comments on them?


Same thing with the greyhound......

Joey.E.CockersMommy
May 3rd, 2005, 01:55 PM
In regards to Cocker Spaniels I am currently doing some interenet research on them so I haveen't had any first hand experience from what I have read so far the English Cockers are supposed to be better temperment in general than the american ones and are more reccomended for children than the american ones. I had an american one when I was young and there was definatley something wrong with it she was terrified of everyone, would attack the paper boy and would through herself at the patio glass door repeptitley, she died at only five years of age from some diesease I don't recall what as I was only about 10 years old. There is also an american cocker down the street that has bitten a few kids in the neighbourhood . My grandfather apparently breeded english cockers and my mom seems to remember them being nice gentle dogs in general.

mafiaprincess
May 3rd, 2005, 02:00 PM
I've heard english cockers have fewer health problems, but never seen or met one.

I've also been told that american cockers are so over bred by byb and mills that there are too many out there will screwy personalities.

I fully understand that there are some terrors out there, I'm just tired of people meeting my sweet little dog, and telling me she is going to turn on me, or ask me how tight the muzzle has to be at the groomers... Everyone seems to have a nightmare am. cocker spaniel story, to the point where it's gotten out of hand and now people that don't have dogs offer me advice because thay have heard cockers are awful dogs.

levimh
May 3rd, 2005, 02:02 PM
I think it also depends on the personality of the dog itself. Yes, they all have different traits, but whatever breed/mutt you decided on, you should test out their peronality.
13 years ago my uncle purchased a Springer Spaniel from a breeder and he was, and still is, a sweet lovable dog. He's one of those dogs you could drag around and tug and pull (not that you would) and he wouldn't care. However, about 5 years ago, my uncle purchased another SS, from the same breeder and he's a menace. He's had the same training as the older dog, but he acts up a lot and misbehaves often.

Prin
May 3rd, 2005, 02:40 PM
Bloodhound owners have told me that they have an attention span of 2 minutes. So you have to do all of your training in 2 minute intervals... Not easy.

Also, when they are smelling, most of them are blind because the skin on the head covers the eyes, so little ones would have to be strong enough to stop the dog from following its nose... (could get hit by a car etc)

lilith_rizel
May 3rd, 2005, 02:45 PM
I've always wanted one. Thought that they were adorable. James and I have decided not to get any more dogs unti he is out of the military, and we are living back home, in MN.

Eleni
May 3rd, 2005, 02:52 PM
Also, when they are smelling, most of them are blind because the skin on the head covers the eyes, so little ones would have to be strong enough to stop the dog from following its nose... (could get hit by a car etc)


Im a big beleiver that children shouldnt be walkign dogs.


My kids are easily strong enough to control our dog but they arent mature enough, or responsible enough yet

I also dont beleive my 12 yr old neice isnt mature enough.

Eleni

lilith_rizel
May 3rd, 2005, 02:55 PM
I really think a bloodhound might be good. Did you say that they are going to have a fenced in yard? And I am sure the parents will be outsied supervising the kids, especially at that age.

doggy lover
May 3rd, 2005, 03:10 PM
I got my last dog when my kids were 5 and 7 he was a bernese X german shepherd. He was wonderful with the kids, although I couldn't yell of try to spank the kids with him around, very protective of them. I agree with larger dogs being better for children, I now have a border collie and couldn't emagine him with young kids. Bloodhounds can have heart problems and can pull bad on leash, cockers have many health problems from epilepsy to cancer, they can be agressive too. I think getting a older pup would be a great thing to do and try to look for a cross of some good types of breeds that are on the calmer side.

Dahlia
May 3rd, 2005, 03:14 PM
I've had a cocker spaniel and he was very hyper and got stressed out very easily. He had very bad separation anxiety, too. He was about 5 yrs old when I got him and every day when we went to work he would chew up everything he could get ahold of into tiny bits. The vets said he was pretty typical of the breed.

coppperbelle
May 3rd, 2005, 06:08 PM
Realistically a 2 1/2 and 4 year old are not old enough to become responsible for pet ownership. YOur daughter will have to take on the responsibility of training, grooming etc.... I was not insinuating that they wouldn't be good with a dog only that the newness would wear off and your daughter would become the main caregiver. This is not to say that they shouldn't have some responsibility like feeding, picking up poop etc...
I have had goldens for the last 26 years. My kids are now 22 and 17 and have always had a responsiblity in the dogs care although I am the main caregiver.
I presently have two goldens. They are an extremely active breed but with training are wonderful with kids. They require a great deal of exercise as any working dog will.
I would avoid the bloodhound. It needs tons of exercise and needs to work. It is also hardheaded and not easily trained. Cocker spaniels if not bred properly can be aggressive so I would not recommend that breed to a family with young kids.
I understand what you are asking when you mention a dominant breed. I don't think you can be guaranteed that a pup will follow the personality of the naturally dominant parent. A lot depends on the parents breeding. I have read that a Bernese and golden make a wonderful mix but they are large and there will be hair. Organizations like MIRA are now using them as guide dogs.
I am a volunteer for Quebec Golden rescue and almost everday hear about a dog being given up through no fault of their own. I want to make sure that anyone considering getting a puppy or dog is well prepared for pet ownership.

Prin
May 3rd, 2005, 06:13 PM
Last I heard, Mira uses Labs x Berneses and call them "Labernese". They have the sociablility of a lab, the calmer nature of the bernese and the HAIR of the bernese. At least those are the ones I have seen. The ones that are rejected by the program can be anything-- hair, activity level, appearance.

You can never be sure of a mutt. You just have to be sure that s/he will have a home no matter what s/he becomes. The last thing rescue dogs need is to be abandoned AGAIN.

coppperbelle
May 3rd, 2005, 07:34 PM
Perhaps I was mistaken about the organization but there is one that is mixing Bernese with goldens. I remember specifically the golden part because I have them.
I did not mean to take a dog from Mira or other organization only that this mix works for them. It is impossible to tell what kind of personality you will get from a mix.

Prin
May 3rd, 2005, 08:15 PM
Hey-- if you're in Quebec, you could get a Mira dog for a year. If it fails the tests, you may be able to adopt him for good. It would be a good way to see how a dog fits into your family, and since obedience and socialization are mandatory for these doggies, you'd learn a ton.

Joey.E.CockersMommy
May 3rd, 2005, 09:38 PM
Mafia princess I agree thats its not fair for someone to assume your dog is going to be a menace because the dog has a certain reputation based on a just a few of them . I have only ever known two american cockers the one I had when I was ten and the one down the street. I know mine was a bit crazy and the one down the street has bitten a few times but that was a few years ago and she may have the situation under control now. So that would mean there are probably two million more american cockers out there with wonderful temperments and owners that were selective and careful picking out their pups and then spending the time to train them. Anyways I am sure your dog is wonderful and you are doing a great job with him.

Safyre
May 3rd, 2005, 10:22 PM
I think the OP has abandoned this thread, it got a bit out of hand. She was jsut asking for a suggestion for a good, calmER dominate breed. Boy ppl love to talk on here :)

Joey.E.CockersMommy
May 3rd, 2005, 11:16 PM
Maybe shes just absorbing all the info and suggestions that are in the thread.

LavenderRott
May 3rd, 2005, 11:26 PM
Actually, I think that this thread goes to prove that one can not just point to a specific breed and say "this breed will .......".

The single most important thing about choosing a breed is research . First you need to research the standard and see what it says about temperment. Then the research continues to see about genetic issues, responsible breeders, good vets, good trainers and anything else that you might think of. If you do all of your research, chances are you will find a dog that fits into your family rather nicely - no matter what your requirements are.

If you think that reading the standard and then going to the local pet store and picking out a puppy is the end of the deal, then chances are - you are going to have major problems.

Prin
May 4th, 2005, 12:06 AM
Also go to dog parks and talk to dog owners about their breeds and the good and bad about them. A lot of people come to our park for that. :)

And safyre, how did this get out of hand? It's a lively discussion about choosing a dog. If you think it is that simple... :confused:

Lucky Rescue
May 4th, 2005, 12:20 AM
Boy ppl love to talk on here

That's what people usually do on message boards. :D

coppperbelle
May 4th, 2005, 07:27 AM
I think the OP has abandoned this thread, it got a bit out of hand. She was jsut asking for a suggestion for a good, calmER dominate breed. Boy ppl love to talk on here :)

She was also asking for a breed that did not dig and was quiet in the house.
Actually I think she received some great advice and suggestions. Personally I don't think any particular breed will meet all her criteria especially as a puppy.

anniebananie
May 4th, 2005, 07:42 AM
:sorry: I do know that a puppy has to be trained - and so does my daughter and son-in-law. She wants a good family dog that they can take for training (as they will also be trained themselves) She also knows this will not be the children's dog, but more her's and her husbands responsibility. The boys would learn - note LEARN - to take care of a dog. At their age they aren't allowed out on their own - let alone take a dog for a walk. By the way the older child has a fish which he takes care of all by himself (under Mum's supervision and no reminders) and has done since he was 2 1/2. It even comes with them when they come down here for the weekend. I am taking note of what all of you are saying - and I do agree it would have been better to have a dog b4 the children arrived - but they didn't.

:crazy: :ca:

coppperbelle
May 4th, 2005, 08:28 AM
I don't think it would have been better to have the dog before the kids were born. I have introduced new dogs into my home while my kids were young with no problems. Actually I think it will be better to bring a dog in last because the dog will know that he is not "top dog" in the home as he was last one in.

I hope your daughter finds the right dog for her family. By the way it is wonderful that your grandson is learning responsibility with his fish. Realistically though many pets are given up everyday as they were bought for the kids and the kids got bored and stopped caring for the animal. Anyone in rescue can tell you that they have heard this excuse many times.
Good luck

Beaglemom
May 4th, 2005, 08:35 AM
Just thought that I would make a comment.

It is never a good idea to get a dog and expect a child to care for it. They usually don't. BUT, in this case the parents know this and are willing to be the primary caregivers and are aware of the cost and responsibility of dog ownership.

That being said, when I was 3 years old my parents bought me my first dog. They didn't expect me to care for her as I couldn't even care for myself. But, they too love animals and had dogs back home and knew of the responsibilities that came with it and were willing to take them on. I'm glad they did because she was my best friend for 16 years!

As long as the parents are willing to take full responsibility for this new family member and get all the proper training, then I think it will work out. Kids and pets are great together if done properly and with the parent's help! The parents must be aware that it will be twice as much work having toddlers and a dog to train. That is why I think an older puppy or young adult would be a better choice.

Also, you can't expect a dog to never make a mistake or be bad. Puppies especially will do bad things and must be taught not to do them. My dog did dig when she was a pup but learned not too. She too chewed up quite a bit of my socks and some shoes and some other stuff, but that was our fault. But, she was trained and now is a great dog. Dogs will also bark, some more than others and can be trained to be a little quieter or to at least stop barking on command.

Wow that was long. Sorry!

Lucky Rescue
May 4th, 2005, 09:20 AM
It is never a good idea to get a dog and expect a child to care for it

That needs to be repeated. Parents should never get a dog (or other pet) unless THEY want it and are fully prepared to accept all care for it.

poohbear123
May 4th, 2005, 11:49 AM
We got our dog for our family But mostly for my children because I felt they needed to grow up with an animal and learn how to take care of one and the responsiblities that go along with owning a pet. I got the dog for my children but knew I would be the primary caregiver because my children are too young and as they get older I believe then they will take on additional responsibilities with taken care of him. He is an australian shepard/collie mix and he is a wonderful dog and great with the kids....we got him when he was two already trained it was the best thing we could do....puppies are such hard work I hope your daughter knows what she is getting in to.

Writing4Fun
May 4th, 2005, 12:07 PM
I don't think it would have been better to have the dog before the kids were born. I have introduced new dogs into my home while my kids were young with no problems. Actually I think it will be better to bring a dog in last because the dog will know that he is not "top dog" in the home as he was last one in.
I've done it both ways. I think it depends on the dog's temperment and how you, as the parent, handle the situation.

Bringing a new puppy into a home with a young child isn't impossible. If you work all day, then it is certainly a lot more difficult. But the person in question is a stay-at-home Mom, and her youngest is around 2yrs old (I believe) - independently mobile and old enough to accompany Mom into the yard during potty breaks.

Eleni
May 4th, 2005, 12:27 PM
It takes comittment to have toddlers and a young pup together.

my kids are 4, 2 and 5 months

we ahve the dog on a schedual for sanitys sake,

my husband takes the dog for walk& exercise at 6 am when hes getting ready for work.


then I get all the kdis ready shoes coats stroller, and the dog and go for Sams morning walk, we are out there about an hour ad i need ten sets of hands /eyes.


then Sam and all the kids end up napping, when everyone wakes up we have lunch and we do it all over again.


Rain or snow we still do it,


it really sucks when its rainy, I throw a rain cover over the stroller and give the kids the umbrealla and I get wet.

its teh nature of the beast, and isnt for everyone.

I love my dog and wouldnt ahve it any other way, but it takes ALOT of energy and patience, and consistency.

all evening sammy can go for walks whenever he pleases for doing well in the day.

thats just the housetraining we have had. the other training is a whole nother story

seriously its like a 4th kid! and I love it. but it is hard work.


Eleni