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Adoption Clinics

SOS MIOW
April 3rd, 2005, 01:57 AM
Numerous healthy, vaccinated and sterilized cats need permanent loving homes. SOS MIOW is holding adoptions clinics every Sunday at our shelter located at 1269 Rte. Harwood in Vaudreuil-Dorion (off Highway #20). For a look at our rescues, please visit our site at www.sosmiow.com. Adoption an abandonned cat or kitten .... save a life - make a friend!

Lucky Rescue
April 4th, 2005, 12:52 PM
I am going to start listing these cats on my site, in an effort to get them homes. Having them stacked in small cages for months is NOT acceptable.

If anyone is looking for a cat, please check out these ones. They are truly desperate!!

canine14
April 4th, 2005, 03:45 PM
I didn't realize that they stayed in these cages 24/7!? I naively thought that they were brought from the fosters' homes for the clinics and put into these cages.

Lucky, did you know that they are not against declawing and offer to have it done during neutering if so desired by the adopter?

I think my decision is made: Sugar, the white polydactyl, has severe conjunctivitis and I am going to bring her home.

Lisa.

canine14
April 4th, 2005, 03:48 PM
Lucky,

I just tried calling about Sugar and the number is not in service. Is it a 450 area code maybe?

Lisa.

Lucky Rescue
April 4th, 2005, 03:57 PM
I've just been informed that the number has been changed.

It's (514) 453-6891

So happy to hear you're taking that little sweetie!!!!

ETA: the cat with the eye problems is not Sugar, it's this one::(

"Poor little Daisy has had a very rough time of it. She was rescued, sick and pregnant, last Fall and gave birth to 3 little ones (See Scamp, Scooter & Sheba). Little Daisy was very weak and thin, and required antibiotics and hydration treatments for a number of weeks. She nursed her kittens as best she could, all the while coping with her own delicate condition. Daisy also has ulcerated eyes (we don't know how much vision she actually has). With her babies now weaned, Daisy will be spayed and vaccinated and ready to finally learn what it is to be a pet. Daisy will need a kind home with someone who can give her lots of TLC."

canine14
April 4th, 2005, 04:32 PM
Sugar definitely had eye problems too. I held her for quite a while a month ago when I was looking for a poly to help me deal with Holly's death. I liked her but decided to wait as I was going to Michigan the next day for a week. She definitely needs FIV/FeLv testing abnd vet care before being introduced to my brood. Daisy sounds almost blind and that environment must be hell on her. Maybe they can work out a deal for me if I take two. I wish I could save them all. Some of the cages are small. Daisy also needs vet care and testing and to be spayed.

SOS MIOW
April 4th, 2005, 08:57 PM
Our cats are not kept in cages 24/7. We have volunteers who go daily to clean, feed, socialize, brush and take care of the cats, as well as let them out of the cages for a couple of hours to play and sit in the windows. We are also planning to build a new shelter with a lot more room, with proper containment units, and a 'playroom' where the cats can be out of their cages for extended periods.

We are overloaded because the place where we are located keeps bringing us more and more cats (strays, abandonned, dumped by irresponsible owners). We do not have foster homes and do the best we can with the resources we have.

Most of our cats are much better off in the centre than the alternative .... on the street, hungry, scared, cold. If you check our website, you will see that we have asked for foster homes and volunteers.

Most of our cats are adopted within a month of being rescued (we hold newbies for one week for observation, then they are vaccinated and the following week, sterilized). We work with 2 local vets; both of whom have been to our shelter on a regular basis and support what we try to do. One of our vets has a key to the shelter and stops by at least once a week to check on the cats.

Occasionally, such as now, we have some cats who have been with us too long and have not been adopted for whatever reason. Anyone who has a suggestion as to what to do, please let me know! I have asked Debbie for help in placing 4 of them.

Since August 2004, we have rescued over 130 cats/kittens. Of these, we have lost less than 10 to disease (kittens to panleuk), and have had 2 returns. We now have 24 cats at the shelter and a waiting list of others who are in dire need (living outside). If you do the math, you will see that we have had 94 successful adoptions since we started. Please see the section "Success Stories" on our website for testimonials.

Those rescues that have been operating for years must have gone through trial and error, triumphs and tears, throughout the initial stages of getting organized. SOS MIOW is experiencing severe growing pains and we need your support.

Rather than judge - why not help us? We are all in this for the same reason are we not?

On a side note: Re Sugar and her conjunctavitus - it has been treated and is all cleared up. Re Diasy (with the ulcerated eyes), we have had an enquiry about her from a lady who has a 3-legged cat. Re declawing - we do not support it; but if an adoptor is going to have it done anyway, we would rather it be done at the same time as sterilization (young cats only). We are not so naive that we don't know that people will get it done even if they promise not to.

If anyone has any questions or comments, please direct them to me personally. Nasty speculation will only hurt the cats.

Thank you.
Janet
SOS MIOW

CyberKitten
April 4th, 2005, 09:32 PM
Re declawing. You are I think the first rescue org I know that has that attitude. Most have a contract that requires people not to declaw. I realize that some people break the contract but even reputable breeders can reclaim a cat if the contract is breeched a cat declawed. I appluad you for helping cats but please educate your clientelle about declawing and do not be so cavalier about it. It is illegal in most industrial countries, not accepted by groups like Cat Fancy or 99.9% of rescue groups so why not join the majority? <g> Personally, I cannot imagine allowing a cat to go to a home where s/he will be declawed. And I am not alone. Many people who adopt cats will not adopt from you given that policy. Most rescues have seen so many declawed cats brought in for behavious issues post declawing that they well know its adverse effects. How long have you been in operation???

I do not mean to be critical and appreciate your work but I do think you need to rethink this policy!!

Shannon83
April 4th, 2005, 10:38 PM
(We are overloaded because the place where we are located keeps bringing us more and more cats (strays, abandonned, dumped by irresponsible owners). We do not have foster homes and do the best we can with the resources we have.)


You have to know when to put your foot down and can't blame others for it for having to many cats when you allow them to keep bring them, it's not hard to say No.

SOS MIOW
April 4th, 2005, 10:41 PM
Of the 110 or so cats we have adopted out, we have arranged for perhaps 4 declawings to be done at the time of sterilization. We do not support it in any way, and will recommend nail clipping or scratch boards as an alternative. However, in the cases where we have arranged it to be done at the time of sterilization, we determined that the kitten was (a) definitely going to a super home, (b) that the sterilization/declawing was done through a specific vet who has an excellent pain management procedure (keeps the cat at the clinic for 3 days after surgery), and (c) the adoptor pays the vet directly and at full price for the declawing.

I know that some adoptors may not admit to their intentions of having it done and will subject the cat to 2 separate operations if we don't allow the cat to be declawed at the time of sterilization. They may also look for a 'cheap' deal whereby the procedure is not done properly and the cat suffers needlessly.

We will not allow declawing of any adult cat, under any circumstances (adults are always sterilized prior to being put up for adoption, so there is never an issue).

I hope we can put this subject to rest.

SOS MIOW

SOS MIOW
April 4th, 2005, 10:49 PM
(We are overloaded because the place where we are located keeps bringing us more and more cats (strays, abandonned, dumped by irresponsible owners). We do not have foster homes and do the best we can with the resources we have.)


You have to know when to put your foot down and can't blame others for it for having to many cats when you allow them to keep bring them, it's not hard to say No.

It is very hard to say "NO" when you are face-to-face with a poor little cat who reaches out from the trap and meows at you. I am able to say "NO" over the phone, but not when I see the desperation in their little eyes. It is for this reason that I am asking for help in placing some of our cats. Due to where we are located, we get to see many of the homeless cats and kittens that are picked up - they are not just a statistic. And once you have made eye contact .....

Shannon83
April 4th, 2005, 10:55 PM
You can't get help from others if you don't do the same back, I.E. others who shell remain nameless have ask you post things and past them around but you've said no or if they want to come to your adoption days with there cats they don't get to keep all of there adoption fee only get to keep what it cost you to have shots down and sterilized.

SOS MIOW
April 4th, 2005, 11:09 PM
Shannon - What in the world are you talking about? If you are talking about Mr. Latreille's cats, he insisted on donating the adoption fee to us and has since sent us other donations. We took 2 of his cats and placed them both in loving homes (Ti-Gris and Griselle - see our website under Success Stories).

Re passing things around - every newsletter I get, I pass onto all of my contacts. However, most of my contacts are already on the main mailing lists of other groups.

If I remember correctly, you are the one who tried to link our name to Second Chance as well as some outfit called Centre Canine de GL (selling cats to labs). Now what are you trying to imply?

Shannon83
April 4th, 2005, 11:16 PM
Now there is a person who can back me up on what I said but she got lot going on right now and there for I'm leaving her out of this.

as for trying to link your name to Second chance, I did no such thing and that you did on your own. remember the pictures you wanted to see and told me they look nothing like anne's farm as you put it. as for Centre Canine de GL I've never heard of the place.

Katze
April 4th, 2005, 11:43 PM
Does your shelter have policies and procedures in place regarding day to day operations? Maybe you should implement a moratorium on taking more cats in until you have the resources to properly look after them.
It is no excuse to say that it is hard to say no. Every "No-Kill" ends up facing this reality at some point.

Lucky Rescue
April 4th, 2005, 11:50 PM
If there is a personal disagreement here, I would prefer the parties take it to email or PM. Thanks!

As for declawing kittens (!), yes I agree no one can be 100% sure that someone won't declaw 2, 3 or even 5 years down the road, but our contract expressly forbids the declawing of any cat or kitten, and signing a legal document is one way to make people think twice about this.

Yes, they may go elsewhere to get a kitten to declaw it, but it won't be on our conscience.

Declawing is a cruelty done for convenience. Our cats have suffered enough through the acts of humans, and we want to ensure their suffering is at an end with us.

SOS MIOW
April 5th, 2005, 12:56 AM
Hi Katze,

Our shelter is located at a local Animal Control Centre and when they pick up stray cats, they conveniently leave the healthy/adoptable ones in the cages where we can see them as we pass by to our little shelter. If we don't take them in, they go straight to the SPCA. Our volunteers know this and bring the cats into our shelter pleading their case. Yes, we have the option to say NO, but in effect it means that the cats will be taken to the SPCA. I have tried to tell the volunteers that we can't save them all, but as I mentioned in previous posts - "when you look into their eyes ......".



Does your shelter have policies and procedures in place regarding day to day operations? Maybe you should implement a moratorium on taking more cats in until you have the resources to properly look after them.
It is no excuse to say that it is hard to say no. Every "No-Kill" ends up facing this reality at some point.

poodletalk
April 5th, 2005, 07:46 AM
I understand Janet, its very hard to turn away an animal when the "owners" are saying, if you don't take my cat, I'm going to through it over the fence to your dogs! "If you don't take my cat, I'm going leave it on the street" I have heard much worst than this as well. Its much easier to tell someone to say NO! but unless YOU are in that situation and hearing this, I doubt you would say NO as well. Unless you work or volunteer at a shelter, you have no idea how cruel and heartless people can be. Any shelter can get over crowded temporarly, long as the animals are well taken care of, socialized, a vet comes in regularly to check on the health of the animals, and the workers and volunteers are doing everything possible to get the animals adopted. I don't see what the problem is. If you are doing all this SOS Mieow, which I read in your posts that you are, I think you are doing a great job to help the animals.

SOS MIOW
April 5th, 2005, 02:49 PM
Thank you for you kinds words, Poodle. You are one of the few who understands what it's like to be on the front lines. Yes, we are overloaded and that is why I have asked Lucky Rescue and others for help. I am not asking to be judged or criticized. And yes, we have cats in cages - we have no other alternative, given the lack of resources. However, we do our best to socialize with our rescues, look after their needs, keep them healthy, have them vaccinated and sterilized, and get them adopted as quickly as we can to good homes.

Janet

Lucky Rescue
April 5th, 2005, 03:53 PM
Please understand, I'm not trying to be argumentative, but there is something I really don't understand.

We will not allow declawing of any adult cat, under any circumstances (adults are always sterilized prior to being put up for adoption, so there is never an issue).

If you can prevent people from declawing adult cats, then why not kittens? Why do you give kittens to people who you know positively will declaw them, and in fact you aid them to do this? Why don't you tell these people to elsewhere and find kittens to declaw?

Declawing kittens is even more outrageous than declawing adult cats, who may have had years of furniture clawing habits behind them.(Not that I agree with declawing them either)

Kittens can be easily trained to use scratch posts, so this pediatric amputation is being done just as a preventative, before the kittens have even done anything at all??

SOS MIOW
April 5th, 2005, 10:54 PM
The issue of declawing has only come up a few times. Once we have determined that the kitten is going to a good home, IF and only IF the person asks about declawing, we will discuss the matter and suggest scratch posts, training, etc. If they are adamant and I feel that they will perhaps go elsewhere for the declawing, I would rather they have it done at the same time as we arrange for the sterilization, through one of our vets who has an excellent pain management program and keeps the kitten for 3 days following surgery. We cover the sterilization and the adoptor deals directly with the vet for the declawing procedure. I would rather that this be done than a second surgery sometime down the road through a vet who may butcher the poor thing.

If I refuse to adopt to the person, I can be sure that they WILL find a cat elsewhere and have it declawed in whatever manner. Unfortunately with today's leather and microfiber sofas and chairs, a lot of people don't want their furniture ruined by a cat's claws.

In any case, it has only happened a couple of times and only with kittens who have yet to be sterilized, and I can report that the kitties are doing well and are happy in their new homes.

Perhaps we are a little more relaxed in our criteria because of the situation we are in (being housed in the Animal Control Centre). We are not dealing with only a few select cats at any given time, but usually 15-20 cats at a time, with more waiting at the door every day. We also do not have foster homes, so the need to get our kitties adopted out quickly is more urgent than if they were safely ensconsed in a household environment.

At the moment, we seem to have an overload of cats at the shelter and have asked for everyone's help in finding suitable homes. Just tonight, I have had to turn down 5 callers who have 'cute little kitties' in their yards that they have been feeding and now want to be picked up. On top of that, the Animal Control People picked up a few new strays that will stay at the pound for 3 days and then go to the SPCA.

If there are groups out there that really want to help, you can put your name in at the Animal Control Centre to take the strays that we can't take (due to lack of space) and foster them, socialize them, etc. We can't save them all. PM me and I will give you their number.

By the way, OSCAR was adopted today and the adoptor also took COTON on a trial basis. Thank you, Lucky, for posting our cats on your site.

SOS MIOW

Lucky Rescue
April 5th, 2005, 11:03 PM
By the way, OSCAR was adopted today and the adoptor also took COTON on a trial basis

That's excellent news! Were they adopted from my site? If so, the adopter can get 30 days free vet care.

Your cats got a huge number of views since I listed them yesterday so I hope more will be adopted.

SOS MIOW
April 5th, 2005, 11:47 PM
Yes, I believe the adoptor found them through PetFinder and also checked out our site as well. She sent me an application last night and came today with her little boy to see the cats. She stayed over an hour before she made her decision.

She has adopted Oscar and has taken Coton on a trial basis. Coton is the Maine Coon who does not defend himself when other cats pick on him. The adoptor has 2 other cats at home and wants to be sure that Coton fits in nicely (she assures me that her other 2 cats are very friendly with others).

I will be speaking to her tomorrow to see how things are going.

Thanks again for your help!

SOS MIOW