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Question about walking dog on a leash

Gripenfelter
March 31st, 2005, 11:19 AM
Is it wrong to let my dog lead all the time eventhough we follow the same route for his daily walk and he has the route memorized?

Because of the snow and narrow sidewalk, I've mostly always let him lead but from reading some of the posts on this board, I'm thinking that maybe I should be walking him beside me?

Trinitie
March 31st, 2005, 11:28 AM
Any dog, but especially a Mal, needs to be trained not to lead. The proper place for a dog is by the side of the top dog. In this case, the dog is leading YOU to where it wants to go. Vary your walking path. Don't always use the same trails. Throw some kinks in the walk.

If you normally walk a 3 block radius, take backlanes, side roads, school yards, anything the dog isn't used to. Also throw in turns. If you go through the school yard, walk around the end goal posts. If you walk down the street, walk around a mailbox or bus shelter. This keeps the dog's attention focused on you, and what YOU want him to do. Do not let your dog dictate where the walk leads to.

mafiaprincess
March 31st, 2005, 12:58 PM
We walk our pup on a gentle leader, because she loves to pull, and be ahead of everyone, and also likes to do the entire walk with her nose buried in the sidewalk.

With the gentle leader, and her walking beside us, she actually every minute or so tilts her head up at me to make sure I'm there, and to see what I am doing. It works a lot better to have your dog beside you.

Gripenfelter
March 31st, 2005, 02:18 PM
Ok thanx. I guess I'll put him on a shorter leash so he's beside me.

He's pretty good about taking cues from me changing direction, slowing down, etc. Just likes to lead though.

vivilee
April 3rd, 2005, 09:24 AM
If your dog is generally well-behaved and is obedient then why feel that you need to correct his leash walking?

You can be alpha in other ways and as long as you are alpha most of the time, the leashing walking isn't that bad if he's in front. You can also let your dog go in front sometimes, it doesn't have to be 100%.

I miss the days when I knew nothing about being the alpha. I think my dog used to love me more. Sure, my dog respects me and behaves but I think by being alpha she doesn't seem as affectionate. Sometimes I wonder about alpha techniques and whether or not they should be strictly upheld at all times.

Trinitie
April 3rd, 2005, 11:07 AM
You can be alpha in other ways and as long as you are alpha most of the time, the leashing walking isn't that bad if he's in front. You can also let your dog go in front sometimes, it doesn't have to be 100%.

With Gripenfelter's dog, he must control the dog 100% of the time or that breed will get a foothold and become top dog. Malmutes are very headstrong dogs and cannot assume a role of alpha in any aspect of the human/dog relationship.

For other breeds, allowing the dog some slack might be ok, but not in this case.

Beetlecat
April 5th, 2005, 08:02 PM
With Gripenfelter's dog, he must control the dog 100% of the time or that breed will get a foothold and become top dog. Malmutes are very headstrong dogs and cannot assume a role of alpha in any aspect of the human/dog relationship.

For other breeds, allowing the dog some slack might be ok, but not in this case.

I don't know :(

I'm not a Mal owner, nor do I know anyone in person that owns one but I do own an Australian Cattle Dog, which are also known for being pushy and dominent. I agree that you have to know your own dog's tendancies, but if leash walking isn't a problem and doesn't seem to be affecting the human/dog relationship, then I see no reason to adjust it.

My dog often leads our walks. He also often goes in doorways before I do. Heck, I usually even feed him before I feed myself. Stricly speaking, all of these things are wrong, but we both still know his place in the pack, and that's all that really matters.

This is just my opinon, but I think being Alpha is more about attitude.

Though, as an aside, I do suggest you walk your dog on a different route everytime you walk together. Simply for the dog's enjoyment and to exercise his mind as well.

Gripenfelter
April 6th, 2005, 09:49 AM
I've been switching up his route a lot since this thread. He seems fine with it. He actually bounces around and seems happy about the change of route.

Thanx. :)

Trinitie
April 6th, 2005, 01:15 PM
Beetlecat, you're quite right, in most instances. But Gripenfelter, I believe you were talking about showing your dog, right? If that's the case you must have total control over your dog, and your dog must not fight you one iota on it. If you cannot control him on daily walks, he may be too much to handle in a show ring. Just a thought.

I'm glad he's enjoying his walks better now though. It's always nice to hear that! :thumbs up

Gripenfelter
April 7th, 2005, 09:25 AM
Beetlecat, you're quite right, in most instances. But Gripenfelter, I believe you were talking about showing your dog, right? If that's the case you must have total control over your dog, and your dog must not fight you one iota on it. If you cannot control him on daily walks, he may be too much to handle in a show ring. Just a thought.

I'm glad he's enjoying his walks better now though. It's always nice to hear that! :thumbs up

Should I stop him from pulling forward as well? He likes to trot at a fairly good pace and if I'm walking, he's always pulling. I've heard its their instinct to pull.

Trinitie
April 7th, 2005, 11:09 AM
While you're walking on a leash, he shouldn't be pulling. That means he's leading you, not you dictating where to go. No matter the speed YOU want to walk, that's the speed he should be walking at. If you're barely moving, he's barely moving. You get the idea.

That breed does love to pull, that's for sure! There are great things on the market that you can use to "harness" (pardon the pun) his energy. There are sleds and carts you can use to let him run and pull you. When he pulls, you'll have to use a harness on him so he doesn't hurt his neck. I'm not sure what's around you, as far as group associations goes, but there may be Malamute groups, or sledding associations that you could enquire at.

I hope this helps!