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Biting

Bailey371
March 12th, 2005, 08:30 AM
I have a 5 month old 1/2 doberman an 1/2 weimaraner. He is obsessed with biting - if you are walking, he will bite your legs (and not gently). If you try to pet him, he is biting. I cannot seem to make him keep his mouth off of me or my kids. He will bite anywhere he can get his mouth on you - head, legs arms, (the kids behind when they play ball). I have never had a dog do this and have no idea how to break him. I have pinched his lips when he bites my hands, mashed his tongue when he bites, layed him down to try and calm him (he gets a little wound up and the biting is worse) and nothing works with Cole. This is more than puppy chewing - and he has toys all over the house - Any suggestions are appreciated. I had previously posted a thread regarding housebreaking him which has been successful. But the biting has not slowed down and he's a big dog - it's not just annoying, it's painful and out of control. This habit has got to be broken - Thanks!

raingirl
March 12th, 2005, 10:01 AM
when he tries to bite yell (and I mean YELL) OWWWW really loud to really startle him, then walk away. Do no make ANY eye contact, do not pet, do not pay attention to him at all for at least a few minutes. Everyone in the family must do this everytime he tries to bite. So if he tries to bite you, everyone must ignore him.

Eventually he will get the idea that biting means that play time and attention stop.

If he doesn't seem to be getting the idea, take longer breaks before you pay attention to him again. What my trainer told me is three times, you're out! the first two times, ignore him for a few minutes, and the third time, totally disapear for at least 10 minutes (go into a room and close the door).

I hope this helps. I have the same problem with my rescue dog. He is already over a year, and he is stubborn, but it's slowly working. It's hard because we could be in the middle of dinner, and he starts to nibble on my feet, we have to get up from the table, walk away, and totally pretend he doesn't exist. If he follows us and tries to nip again, we move again. If he does it a third time, we move to a room with a door (without him) and close him out for 10 minutes. It really sucks when he does it during our favourite TV shows.

Bailey371
March 12th, 2005, 10:25 AM
Thanks for the advice - I had read your thread about your dog. I had kept thinking he'd grow out of it, but it's getting much worse. I'll try what you recommended. I love the dog, but this is getting old.....and painful. He just walked up to me a minute ago and nipped my leg. It's almost as if it's his way of communicating. After he nipped, he walked away. It's not aggression yet, but I worry that it could turn out to be. I'll try the ignore tactic and see what happens. Thanks again.

wjranch
March 21st, 2005, 10:59 PM
I use a different method with my Dobe. He was also very 'mouthy' and not very gentle about it. I did try the 'ouch' method, and ignore....it didn't work...
Here is the link to a thread I put what I do on.... try it, maybe it'll help :D

http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?p=105045#post105045

SnowDancer
March 22nd, 2005, 09:24 AM
My 19 lb. American Eskimo does this as well - and doesn't recognize the word ouch. Unfortunately his teeth and jaw strength are "superb". But, he has never once broken the skin and when I saw "ouch" he starts looking for who might be hurting me, as it certainly couldn't be him. Has your dog broken the skin, that would be an additional problem. Also, I hate to ask, but does he ever look at you fondly and then after your back is turned then start the biting/nipping? I have been through this with another dog - never with me, but with other people. Not to alarm you, just wanted to clarify if it is play biting - which I know hurts and can develop.

MIA
March 22nd, 2005, 06:22 PM
When we adopted our Dobie, same thing! I did the OWWW didn't do a thing, one time she nailed me in the back of my leg and I grabbed her mouth very calmly stuck my thumb on her tongue and pushed it into the back of her mouth until she was quite uncomfortable, she never bit me again! This has to be done quickly and calmly and not in an abusive manner, not staring the dog down either just a nonchalant move. Might not be the best choice but heck worked for us!
:crazy:

matt
March 25th, 2005, 07:45 AM
First, understand that this is very normal behaviour in a pup. I have 2 GSD's and they have a tendancy to be mouthy. What I favour is a redirect. For example... when they bit or nip it is a " no bite" in a sharp slightly raised voice. Then , and this is key, make sure they have a chew that you pick up and quickly given them as a redirect. Once they have it praise the heck out of them. This nipping usually ends around 6 months with most dogs. I WOULD not use a method that causes them pain as it is not needed 99% of the time. This does take consistency from ALL members of the household. :)

Prin
March 25th, 2005, 11:20 AM
I'm a little more aggressive with the no biting because around here people threaten to sue you for a lick so I can't take any chances. Some twit tried to train my big goofy Boo to be an attack dog. Every time you were wearing any type of hand covering, he would start to jump and bite your hands. What we did was every time his teeth sank in, we'd grab around the top of his muzzle firmly and say "no biting" loud and harsh. I also did it with my little girl when we got her because she was snappy. When she'd snap, we'd grab her and say no biting and then we'd continue our behavior (usually a late night belly rub, lol) to provoke another snap but before the snap we'd say no biting in more of a warning tone (with her, you can see it coming). Then of course praise when she avoids the regular pattern of escalation.

There is a dog at our park who steals gloves-- I was putting my gloves on and I saw her eyeing me. I just said "Come on, try it." and I maintained eye contact. Sometimes what works to stop a behavior is showing them you are ready for it...

In that respect, I just find it a lot easier to correct if you provoke it first. You know when it is coming so you are more prepared for the correction.

Cactus Flower
March 25th, 2005, 12:08 PM
Good suggestions, all.

I just came on to beg for a picture. Doberman/Weimeraner- would LOVE to see that!