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RCMP: Do's and Don'ts of Training a Dog

nymph
March 9th, 2005, 03:39 PM
Found this interesting article from the RCMP Police Dog Service Training Centre: http://www.rcmp.ca/pds/dog/trng1_e.htm

Some Do's and Don'ts

The following are recommended principles to achieve successful dog training.

• All dog training must be founded upon educating the dog, that is, developing instincts and drawing out accidental and acquired habits.

• Situations and contacts must be interpreted entirely from the dog's reactions and abilities, and not the human's.

• The dog is not to be fooled. It has a sense of humiliation as well as a sense of pride. If the dog has been taught to do certain acts, do not give it the command and then trifle with it. At all times you must let the dog see what you are doing. Always is the dog to understand that when you say certain things, it is to do certain things.

• Success must be at the completion of an act of training. The dog is to understand that at the end, a certain thing will take place. For instance, if it is tracking, it must find the person tracked.

• Commands always should be given in the same words and with the same tone of voice and speed of speaking.

• Anticipate the dog`s actions. Think ahead of time and give your command before the dog acts or moves.

• If the dog goes one step wrongly, do not repeat this step but return at the beginning, for the dog must be taught to consider only successful acts in their entirety.

• Reward or punishment should follow quickly after every act. To punish a dog at any other time than instantly after the wrong act is cruelty rather than a part of training, for the dog does not connect the punishment to the act.

• The dog has a single-track mind. Teach one specific thing at a time. This does not mean that a training period cannot include a half-dozen different tasks.

• Give the dog a moment's time for carrying out your command. To demand instant obedience is to confuse the dog.

• Have patience. The dog is not a human being. The dog probably is more successful as a dog than the handler is as a human being.

• Develop a bond. All future training depends upon this.

• Remember that a dog cannot ask questions, neither can it understand all you say. It knows only the words, the commands and the names you teach it.

• The success of a handler depends on being able to make a dog understand what it has to do and then to instill that into its brain until it becomes instinctive.

• Always use kindness.

• Be decisive, firm, and most of all, be sure that you know exactly what you want and how it should be done.

• Never try to teach a dog anything until you yourself have a thorough knowledge of how to teach it, and a clear mental picture of each stage.

• As far as possible, always have your dog with you. You cannot train it all the time, but it will become accustomed to your actions, words, and surroundings which will help to make the training easier. When basic training is over, however, the dog should be housed in a kennel, not made a house pet of.

• Never allow other people to pet and fuss over your dog unnecessarily. You are the dog's handler and it must look to you for everything.

• Your first thought is your dog.

• You must always finish a training period on a good note. Never leave off if the dog has done something wrong. Correction is essential.

• Never put your dog away for the night with a cross word. End the training period on a happy note and see that the dog has mastered the obstacle - and knows that it has done so - before you "good night".

• Do not punish the dog while you are angry or lack control of yourself.

• Do not lose your temper while training the dog. If you do, the dog will lose some of its respect for you.

• Do not chase the dog to catch it; it must come to you or follow after you.

• Do not coax the dog to you and then turn upon it with punishment. You will regret the deception.

• Do not nag the dog; do not give orders to it constantly; do not pester it with your shoutings.

• Do not punish the dog for failure to obey unless you are certain that it understood fully what you commanded.

• Do not praise the dog for doing a certain act, then at a later time, scold it for doing the same act.

• Do not permit anyone to give commands to the dog while you are training it.

Shamrock
March 9th, 2005, 03:45 PM
Very interesting, excellent guidelines.
I have printed them out. Thanks for sharing. :thumbs up
:ca:

twodogsandacat
March 9th, 2005, 09:33 PM
Awesome. Nothing but point form but all awesome points. Proud to be :ca:

Dahlia
March 12th, 2005, 11:17 AM
When basic training is over, however, the dog should be housed in a kennel, not made a house pet of.
What does this mean? All good points, I just don't understand this one exactly. Are they saying you shouldn't let the dog have the run of the house until he's trained?

Katherine1
March 12th, 2005, 11:35 AM
What does this mean? All good points, I just don't understand this one exactly. Are they saying you shouldn't let the dog have the run of the house until he's trained?
I think that part has to do with training a police dog Dahlia.

Dahlia
March 12th, 2005, 11:42 AM
Oh, lol. I should've read the top line of Nymph's post a little better. Sorry. Makes sense, now.

twodogsandacat
March 12th, 2005, 11:57 AM
I think that part has to do with training a police dog Dahlia.

Yes police dogs. In all fairness the full line was: As far as possible, always have your dog with you. You cannot train it all the time, but it will become accustomed to your actions, words, and surroundings which will help to make the training easier. When basic training is over, however, the dog should be housed in a kennel, not made a house pet of.

AS FAR AS POSSIBLE,ALWAYS HAVE YOUR DOG WITH YOU. All good points (unless the dog) is a pet but I can't argue with success. Police organizations have rules for their service dogs and I recently read of a case where a rule was disobeyed.

A child was attacked by a police dog as he approached it lying on the bed. Although the dog had always been nothing but friendly around the child the kennel rule was violated and the handler and the boys mother were out. There was talk of a suspension but I don't know how it ended up.

All in all I believe these rules indicate a huge amount of respect and care for the dog and seems to place the onus on the handler. I won’t lie – I like that approach.

mona_b
March 12th, 2005, 12:22 PM
See all the Police K9 handlers that I know,including my brother and the ones I deal with don't have their dogs in a kennel at home.They are part of the family.They play with the kids,they sleep in their rooms.These dogs are very smart.They know when it's time to play,and they know when it's time to work.I have a retired Police Dog.I did all his basic training.Then he passed and joined the force.He became my brothers partner.Tron was always around people at my brothers house.That included kids.Now whether or not the RCMP does things different,well I will have to look into that.As for the training before they graduate,I had to make sure Tron was in contact with everyone.I had to do major socializing with him.Tron is still great with people.He is now 9 years old,and I have never had a problem with him... :)

My brother since has a new partner Dante.He is great.We visit and he comes here also.And he just loves to see my dad,who is a senior.He actually will lay by my dads feet.He's great with Tron.And he was great when I had Yukon.

So,this is just my experience with Police Dogs.And since I am also on the force,I do have alot of experince with them and do deal with them..... :)

twodogsandacat
March 12th, 2005, 12:44 PM
So,this is just my experience with Police Dogs.And since I am also on the force,I do have alot of experince with them and do deal with them..... :)

Not arguing with you Mona_B. I liked the points and if anybody disagrees with a single point then that is just one point, skip it and I think we can agree the rest are all good. Basically I liked the overall attitude of the article more than any particular point.

Personally I also would like the dogs to be part of the family and I know the canine officers that live on my brothers street look just like every other dog owner when they walk the neighbourhood with their off duty (does that apply) dogs.

The case I mentioned was just one US departments policy and when it was ignored it had bad results and one case doesn;t prove anything.

mona_b
March 12th, 2005, 12:51 PM
Oh I too like the points... :) The only reason I brought that one up was of my experience and just wanted to point it out that they are treated as part of the family.... :)

Yeah,it's off duty for the dogs too...... :D

Trons been "off duty" for a little over a year now.But my brother will still put him to work when we go there.And he enjoys it.He still remembers alot of his Police Training.... :D :thumbs up

Dahlia
March 12th, 2005, 02:54 PM
Yeah, I just quoted the last part because I wasn't quite sure what they meant by that. I know what the whole thing was.

Dahlia
March 12th, 2005, 03:01 PM
A child was attacked by a police dog as he approached it lying on the bed. Although the dog had always been nothing but friendly around the child the kennel rule was violated and the handler and the boys mother were out. Was the child left alone with just the dog?

twodogsandacat
March 12th, 2005, 06:44 PM
Well I can't find the link on this computer but the handler and the boys mother were out on a date. There was a cage in the garage and normally it would be put there.

I have found another link to the same story but it is short. It indicates that the child may of let the dog out of the cage and used it as a pillow.

http://www.geocities.com/ericsquire/articles/dogs/koin041117.htm

matt
March 15th, 2005, 08:53 PM
I have had different experience with Police K9's. I have been told numerous times that it is rare for these dogs to be kept at home EXCEPT in a kennel. These dogs are NOT pets. They are working dogs with a very important and very real job. I have never heard of these dgos being treated as house pets. Everything they do they do for reward (Kong etc.) To have them overly socialized in a family setting could be counterproductive. Now I'm talking PATROL dogs not Narcotics , Explosives etc. I know that the dogs on the Toronto Police Service DO NOT live with the handlers nor are they treated like pets UNTIL they retire from active duty. I assumed this was standard practice but I guess not.

mona_b
March 16th, 2005, 05:33 PM
Actuall,yes,the Toronto Police dogs do live at home with their handlers,and are a part of the family.My Brother worked for Metro K9 before he moved and joined another K9 force. :)




Police Dog Services

The Toronto Police Dog Services was formed in 1989. At present, the unit consists of 21 handlers and dogs. Most Teams are comprised of one handler and one General Purpose Police Dog. There are currently three exceptions to this where one handler has both a General Purpose Police Dog and a Narcotic/Gun Detection Dog. There is also a handler who has an Explosives Detector Dog. Every handler is responsible for the care and maintenance of his canine partner(s). The dog not only works with the officer but becomes part of the officer's family.

matt
March 17th, 2005, 02:00 PM
I stand corrected then Mona. I was recently told this by someone currently on the force in Metro. Thanks for clearing it up though.

mona_b
March 17th, 2005, 10:07 PM
No Problem......... :thumbs up