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Feline Leukemia & Bone Marrow Cancer: Different?

pawsnwings
February 20th, 2005, 07:13 PM
Hello all,

My cat died of bone marrow cancer in January of 2004. I was wondering because I could never find any information on "bone marrow cancer", is there a difference between feline leukemia and bone marrow cancer or are they the same thing? :confused: If they are different, how common is bone marrow cancer in cats? Thank you.

CyberKitten
February 20th, 2005, 08:09 PM
I am not a vet but as an oncologist, I can tell you the two are quite different in humans.

As you know, feline leukemia is not what we think of as leukemia in people. Of course, there are so many types of leukemia in humans!!! Feline Leukemia is a virus that affects the immune system of a cat . In humans, leukemia is a type of cancer that affects the leukocytes or white blood cells. - causing them to reproduce more rapidly than the norm. Myeloma or if you will "cancer of the bone marrow" affects those cells we commonly refer to as plasma.

Plasma and leukocytes are different fuctions in the body. Simply stated, plasma is what we think of as the "liquid portion" of the blood. It consists of 90% water and a complex number of other components. Plasma transports the materials needed by cells as well as those materials that must be removed from cells.

Leukocytes (which include Lymphocytes, Monocytes, Neutrophils, Eosinophils and Basophils) essentially fight infection though the various types all do this in different parts of the body and in unique ways.

In myeloma, there are excessive numbers of abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow and overproduction of intact monoclonal immunoglobulin.

These are both multiple cell neoplasms that usually originate in the bone marrow and affect the immune system but they are different TYPES of neoplasma or cancers. The treatment is thus different as well.

In my practice, I see more cases of leukemia than I do of myeloma but that may be because I am a pediatric oncologist. (That said, there are more types of "adult" leukemia but I digress)

A person - (not sure about it in cats but I assume some if the same) with multiple myeloma, has a group of abnormal plasma cells (myeloma cells) that multiply to make up more than 10 percent of the cells in the bone marrow. The result can be erosion of bones. It also affects the way bone marrow and immune system works, which can lead to anemia and infection. More infections tend to occur later in the disease. Multiple myeloma may also cause problems with kidneys.

The leukemias have a diverse symptoms depending on whether one is dignoased with acute or chronic and a veriety of other factors. Essentially though, an individual's ability to fight infection is seriously compromised. The growing cells also crowd out other blood cells and the body's ability to carry oxygen in the body and the body's capability of preventing bleeding is also adversely affected.


I hope this helps!



.

Karin
February 20th, 2005, 08:20 PM
I am not a vet but as an oncologist, I can tell you the two are quite different in humans.

As you know, feline leukemia is not what we think of as leukemia in people. Of course, there are so many types of leukemia in humans!!! Feline Leukemia is a virus that affects the immune system of a cat . In humans, leukemia is a type of cancer that affects the leukocytes or white blood cells. - causing them to reproduce more rapidly than the norm. Myeloma or if you will "cancer of the bone marrow" affects those cells we commonly refer to as plasma.

Plasma and leukocytes are different fuctions in the body. Simply stated, plasma is what we think of as the "liquid portion" of the blood. It consists of 90% water and a complex number of other components. Plasma transports the materials needed by cells as well as those materials that must be removed from cells.

Leukocytes (which include Lymphocytes, Monocytes, Neutrophils, Eosinophils and Basophils) essentially fight infection though the various types all do this in different parts of the body and in unique ways.

In myeloma, there are excessive numbers of abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow and overproduction of intact monoclonal immunoglobulin.

These are both multiple cell neoplasms that usually originate in the bone marrow and affect the immune system but they are different TYPES of neoplasma or cancers. The treatment is thus different as well.

In my practice, I see more cases of leukemia than I do of myeloma but that may be because I am a pediatric oncologist. (That said, there are more types of "adult" leukemia but I digress)

A person - (not sure about it in cats but I assume some if the same) with multiple myeloma, has a group of abnormal plasma cells (myeloma cells) that multiply to make up more than 10 percent of the cells in the bone marrow. The result can be erosion of bones. It also affects the way bone marrow and immune system works, which can lead to anemia and infection. More infections tend to occur later in the disease. Multiple myeloma may also cause problems with kidneys.

The leukemias have a diverse symptoms depending on whether one is dignoased with acute or chronic and a veriety of other factors. Essentially though, an individual's ability to fight infection is seriously compromised. The growing cells also crowd out other blood cells and the body's ability to carry oxygen in the body and the body's capability of preventing bleeding is also adversely affected.


I hope this helps!



.

I'm impressed CyberKitten! I need you on my side....but I am an adult. ( I can act like a WALB if needed lol!)

Lucky Rescue
February 20th, 2005, 08:24 PM
I'm very sorry about your cat. I had a cat die from FeLV too. It's horrible.:(